536,458 research outputs found

    Immigration: An Opinion

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    immigration, U.S., opinion

    Immigrants, Employment, and Labor Unions: Nashville—Prospects for Coalition

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    immigration, employment, labor unions, Nashville

    Business License Revocation: Is This What the Tennessee Economy Needs?

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    immigration, Tennessee, law, economy, labor

    Immigrants, Education, and Labor Market: A Perspective from Four States

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    immigration, education, labor market, workforce, population, Tennessee

    Toward Improving Canada's Skilled Immigration Policy: An Evaluation Approach

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    Economic Growth and innovation, Canada, immigration, skilled immigration, point system

    U.S. Immigration: A Historical Perspective

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    immigration, U.S., history

    “Immigrationomics”: A Discussion of Some Key Issues

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    immigration, U.S., labor

    Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill

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    Immigration as Commerce: A New Look at the Federal Immigration Power and the Constitution

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    The relationship of immigration law to the Constitution has long been incoherent. One result is that there is little clarity on the appropriate standard of review for constitutional violations when aspects of immigration law and policy are challenged in the federal courts. This Article advances the Commerce Clause as the anchor of a new understanding of the link between the government\u27s immigration power and the Constitution. Despite the extensive early history of the Foreign Commerce Clause as the presumed source of the immigration power, it plays almost no role in immigration jurisprudence today, and few scholars have seriously considered its suitability for that role. More strikingly, none have explored the Interstate Commerce Clause as an appropriate source of the immigration power, one that could open the door to a normalization of constitutional analysis in the immigration context. The Article argues that both the Foreign and the Interstate Commerce Clauses should be understood to undergird the contemporary immigration power, and suggests that acknowledging immigration’s relationship to the Commerce Clause clears a path to more routine constitutional review of immigration law and policy
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