42,494 research outputs found

    Fortalecimiento de una cuenca h铆drica desde el dise帽o urbano y arquitect贸nico. Centro Cultural Sostenible en Villa de Leyva

    No full text
    Art铆culo de Investigaci贸nEl prop贸sito del presente trabajo investigativo corresponde al desarrollo de un equipamiento cultural para los habitantes de Villa de Leyva, municipio de car谩cter patrimonial y colonial representativo por sus costumbres y tradiciones. hoy en d铆a, la agricultura urbana es un factor imprescindible para el desarrollo de la pertenencia social y la participaci贸n comunitaria.RESUMEN PALABRAS CLAVE 1. TABLA DE CONTENIDO 2. INTRODUCCI脫N 3. OBJETIVOS 4. METODOLOG脥A 5. RESULTADOS 6. CONCLUSIONES REFERENCIAS ANEXOSPregradoArquitect

    Community engagement in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis research in Brazil, Ethiopia, and Sri Lanka: A decolonial approach for global health.

    Get PDF
    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a parasitic skin disease endemic in at least 88 countries where it presents an urgent, albeit often "neglected" public health problem. In this paper, we discuss our model of decolonial community engagement in the ECLIPSE global health research program, which aims to improve physical and mental health outcomes for people with CL. The ECLIPSE program has four interlinked phases and underpinning each of these phases is sustained and robust community engagement and involvement that guides and informs all activities in ECLIPSE. Our decolonial approach implies that the model for community engagement will be different in Brazil, Ethiopia and Sri Lanka. Indeed, we adopt a critical anthropological approach to engaging with community members and it is precisely this approach we evaluate in this paper. The data and material we draw on were collected through qualitative research methods during community engagement activities. We established 13 Community Advisory Groups (CAGs): in Brazil ( = 4), Ethiopia ( = 6), and Sri Lanka ( = 3). We identified four overarching themes during a thematic analysis of the data set: (1) Establishing community advisory groups, (2) CAG membership and community representation, (3) Culturally appropriate and context-bespoke engagement, and (4) Relationships between researchers and community members. During our first period of ECLIPSE community engagement, we have debunked myths (for instance about communities being "disempowered"), critiqued our own practices (changing approaches in bringing together CAG members) and celebrated successes (notably fruitful online engagement during a challenging COVID-19 pandemic context). Our evaluation revealed a gap between the exemplary community engagement frameworks available in the literature and the messy, everyday reality of working in communities. In the ECLIPSE program, we have translated ideal(istic) principles espoused by such community engagement guidance into the practical realities of "doing engagement" in low-resourced communities. Our community engagement was underpinned by such ideal principles, but adapted to local sociocultural contexts, working within certain funding and regulatory constraints imposed on researchers. We conclude with a set of lessons learned and recommendations for the conduct of decolonial community engagement in global health research. [Abstract copyright: Copyright 漏 2022 Polidano, Parton, Agampodi, Agampodi, Haileselassie, Lalani, Mota, Price, Rodrigues, Tafere, Trad, Zerihun and Dikomitis.

    Application of lactic acid bacteria for the biopreservation of meat products: A systematic review

    Get PDF
    .The increasing concern of consumers about food quality and safety and their rejection of chemical additives has promoted the breakthrough of the biopreservation field and the development of studies on the use of beneficial bacteria and their metabolites as potential natural antimicrobials for shelf life extension and enhanced food safety. Control of foodborne pathogens in meat and meat products represents a serious challenge for the food industry which can be addressed through the intelligent use of bio-compounds or biopreservatives. This article aims to systematically review the available knowledge about biological strategies based on the use of lactic acid bacteria to control the proliferation of undesirable microorganisms in different meat products. The outcome of the literature search evidenced the potential of several strains of lactic acid bacteria and their purified or semi-purified antimicrobial metabolites as biopreservatives in meat products for achieving longer shelf life or inhibiting spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, especially when combined with other technologies to achieve a synergistic effect.S

    El Legado Prehisp谩nico en la Vivienda Colectiva 鈥淟as relaciones entre la vivienda colectiva estatal y tres huacas del Valle del R铆mac鈥

    Get PDF
    Durante la segunda mitad del siglo XX, Lima ha venido enfrentando el incremento demogr谩fico explosivo. Para ordenar este crecimiento, el Estado plantea la vivienda colectiva, para devolver el sentido de comunidad y brindar espacio p煤blico de calidad. Parte de esta nueva urbanizaci贸n se da en zonas con patrimonio arqueol贸gico preexistente, produciendo su afectaci贸n y desaparici贸n. Sin embargo, algunos ejemplares de vivienda colectiva intentaron devolverles el valor a las huacas a pesar de las restrictivas pol铆ticas culturales, que impiden la apropiaci贸n de estas bajo el criterio de intangibilidad. Se toman tres casos de estudio: Conjunto Habitacional Palomino y Huaca Palomino (1962), con el desarrollo de los primeros grandes proyectos de vivienda colectiva; Conjunto Torres de Limatambo (1980) y huacas La Calera I y II en los a帽os 80, con un segundo auge de esta construcci贸n; y conjunto Parques de la Huaca y la Huaca Huantinamarca (2010), con el nuevo boom inmobiliario. La investigaci贸n destaca la intenci贸n de los arquitectos de Palomino y Limatambo de intentar ligar a las huacas a las din谩micas urbanas del conjunto con el discurso de encaminarse a la nueva modernidad valorando el pasado. Sin embargo, se evidencia que la principal preocupaci贸n en la 茅poca de expansi贸n urbana no eran las huacas ya que era tomada como una escultura aislada. A ello se le suma la falta de planes de delimitaci贸n por parte del Estado. Asimismo, hacia la segunda d茅cada del sigo XXI hay un cambio de percepci贸n, sin embargo, esto se da en un contexto en el cual la vivienda colectiva ha sido reemplazada por condominios cerrados que ya no buscan el espacio abierto para crear comunidad. As铆, la 鈥渧ivienda colectiva鈥 actual ya no sigue un discurso de devolverle a la huaca su grandeza, al contrario, la encierra junto con ella llevando el discurso escenario aislado de la ciudad

    Metaphors of London fog, smoke and mist in Victorian and Edwardian Art and Literature

    Get PDF
    Julian Wolfreys has argued that after 1850 writers employed stock images of the city without allowing them to transform their texts. This thesis argues, on the contrary, that metaphorical uses of London fog were complex and subtle during the Victorian and Edwardian periods, at least until 1914. Fog represented, in particular, formlessness and the dissolution of boundaries. Examining the idea of fog in literature, verse, newspaper accounts and journal articles, as well as in the visual arts, as part of a common discourse about London and the state of its inhabitants, this thesis charts how the metaphorical appropriation of this idea changed over time. Four of Dickens's novels are used to track his use of fog as part of a discourse of the natural and unnatural in individual and society, identifying it with London in progressively more negative terms. Visual representations of fog by Constable, Turner, Whistler, Monet, Markino, O'Connor, Roberts and Wyllie and Coburn showed an increasing readiness to engage with this discourse. Social tensions in the city in the 1880s were articulated in art as well as in fiction. Authors like Hay and Barr showed the destruction of London by its fog because of its inhabitants' supposed degeneracy. As the social threat receded, apocalyptic scenarios gave way to a more optimistic view in the work of Owen and others. Henry James used fog as a metaphorical representation of the boundaries of gendered behaviour in public, and the problems faced by women who crossed them. The dissertation also examines fog and individual transgression, in novels and short stories by Lowndes, Stevenson, Conan Doyle and Joseph Conrad. After 1914, fog was no more than a crude signifier of Victorian London in literature, film and, later, television, deployed as a cliche instead of the subtle metaphorical idea discussed in this thesis

    Building body identities - exploring the world of female bodybuilders

    Get PDF
    This thesis explores how female bodybuilders seek to develop and maintain a viable sense of self despite being stigmatized by the gendered foundations of what Erving Goffman (1983) refers to as the 'interaction order'; the unavoidable presentational context in which identities are forged during the course of social life. Placed in the context of an overview of the historical treatment of women's bodies, and a concern with the development of bodybuilding as a specific form of body modification, the research draws upon a unique two year ethnographic study based in the South of England, complemented by interviews with twenty-six female bodybuilders, all of whom live in the U.K. By mapping these extraordinary women's lives, the research illuminates the pivotal spaces and essential lived experiences that make up the female bodybuilder. Whilst the women appear to be embarking on an 'empowering' radical body project for themselves, the consequences of their activity remains culturally ambivalent. This research exposes the 'Janus-faced' nature of female bodybuilding, exploring the ways in which the women negotiate, accommodate and resist pressures to engage in more orthodox and feminine activities and appearances

    The merchant princes of Nassau: the maintenance of political hegemony in The Bahamas 1834-1948

    Get PDF
    The former slave owning class in The Bahamas fought a rearguard action to defendits political, economic and social hegemony. It shaped the local Abolition Act of1834 to meet its own requirements, particularly to ensure apprentices would remainin a position of subservience and obedience.The initial period of concern for the welfare and rights of the freedmen onthe part of the Imperial Government soon waned and the white oligarchy was leftto govern the newly emancipated without much interference from London.Imperial Government policy also aided the elite in preventing the formation of aclass of independent, peasant freeholders. On the Out Islands labour orsharecropping tenancies, squatting and the working of commonage were the norm.Coercive labour systems procured a stable and dependent workforce in a number ofindustries. The cash economy was limited outside of Nassau and themerchant/landowners were in possession of the little available capital.Tough laws, designed to keep the lower classes in awe and fear ofauthorities, were passed by a Legislature dominated by the white elite. Much morewas spent on law and order than education or social reforms. The Bahamascontinued to be governed under the seventeenth century Old Representative systemand the ruling class stubbornly protected its rights and privileges. But theconstitutional system was not a responsible one and hardly representative. Openvoting, inequitable constituencies, a franchise weighted in favour of the propertiedclasses, non-payment of representatives and plural voting ensured the return of thewhite Nassau merchants. The agro-commercial elite had a limited vision beyondits own interests, particularly in regard to financial policy. There were manystruggles between the Legislature and the Governors over control of finance andexpenditure, reaching its climax in the 1930s when the Governor insisted onReserve Powers. The Colonial Office investigated the possibilities but realisedthat, barring a crisis, the initiative had to come from the Assembly, which wouldnever have arisen in The Bahamas.The ruling whites experienced little challenge from the coloured and blackmiddle classes. They sought to assimilate themselves into white society anddistanced themselves from the black lower classes. They were generallyconservative in their views. The non-whites did not attempt to form a politicalparty, despite the fact Bahamian society became more polarised in the 1920s and1930s. No leaders emerged to take advantage of the discontent. After the 1942Riot, the ruling whites made a few limited concessions that safeguarded theirdominanc

    The temporality of rhetoric: the spatialization of time in modern criticism

    Get PDF
    Every conception of criticism conceals a notion of time which informs the manner in which the critic conceives of history, representation and criticism itself. This thesis reveals the philosophies of time inherent in certain key modern critical concepts: allegory, irony and the sublime. Each concept opens a breach in time, a disruption of chronology. In each case this gap or aporia is emphatically closed, elided or denied. Taking the philosophy of time elaborated by Giorgio Agamben as an introductory proposition, my argument turns in Chapter One to the allegorical temporality which Walter Benjamin sees as the time of photography. The second chapter examines the aesthetics of the sublime as melancholic or mournful untimeliness. In Chapter Three, Paul de Man's conception of irony provides an exemplary instance of the denial of this troubling temporal predicament. In opposition to the foreclosure of the disturbing temporalities of criticism, history and representation, the thesis proposes a fundamental rethinking of the philosophy of time as it relates to these categories of reflection. In a reading of an inaugural meditation on the nature of time, and in examining certain key contemporary philosophical and critical texts, I argue for a critical attendance to that which eludes those modes of thought that attempt to map time as a recognizable and essentially spatial field. The Confessions of Augustine provide, in the fourth chapter, a model for thinking through the problems set up earlier: Augustine affords us, precisely, a means of conceiving of the gap or the interim. In the final chapter, this concept is developed with reference to the criticism of Arnold and Eliot, the fiction of Virginia Woolf and the philosophy of cinema derived from Deleuze and Lyotard. In conclusion, the philosophical implications of the thesis are placed in relation to a conception of the untimeliness of death

    Military archhitecture in colonial Camag眉ey

    No full text
    El presente trabajo centra su atenci贸n en las construcciones militares que se desarrollaron en Camag眉ey durante el per铆odo colonial. A trav茅s de fuentes documentales primarias se analizan los principales exponentes de este repertorio con especial 茅nfasis en los cuarteles. La contribuci贸n de los ingenieros militares del ej茅rcito espa帽ol fue esencial para el desarrollo de estas edificaciones en territorio camag眉eyano, pues resultaron los principales proyectistas de estos esfuerzos constructivos. Igualmente se eval煤a la trascendencia del pensamiento de la Ilustraci贸n en estas obras y la importancia de estos hechos para la historia de la arquitectura camag眉eyana.The present article aims to the militaries constructions developed in Camag眉ey during the colonial period. Through primary documental sources the main examples of this repertory are analyzed with special emphasis in the barracks. The contribution of the militaries engineers of the Spanish army was essential for the development of these buildings in Camag眉ey 驴s territories, because they were the main planners of these constructive efforts. Equally, this text evaluates the influence of the Enlightenment thinking in these works and the importance of these facts for the history of the Cuban architecture.脕rea de Historia del Art

    Emotions and Affects of Convolution

    No full text
    This chapter is an investigation into technologies of the non-rational through emotions and affects of convolution. Emotions and affects of convolution traverse many different settings and are part and parcel of forms of power that link the military, colonial forms of power, media power, soft power, and the 鈥済rey areas鈥 of non-physical abuse primarily associated with coercive control and narcissistic abuse. The chapter specifically explores the connections between what I call a social and political apparatus of narcissism and the particularity and genealogy of narcissistic abuse as a way of unpacking some of these issues. At the heart of this discussion are communication strategies based upon very strange and duplicitous forms of communication. They use methods that have largely been excised from reason or are only allowed to appear in certain sanitized forms, including techniques and practices related to: suggestion, priming, precognition, retrocausality, retroactivity, time travel, non-causality, cognitive reattribution, confabulation, anticipation, pre-emption, subliminal, non-conscious, and other paradoxical forms of communication, especially the case of counterfactuals. I have explored how these paradoxical forms of communication are central to modern technologies of power by drawing on a range of strategies that are neither rational nor irrational, but more akin to what some affect scholars have called the 鈥渘on-rational
    corecore