6 research outputs found

    The accounting history of the English brewing industry 1700-1939: an exploration of Foucauldian disciplinarity

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    The English brewing trade continues to be of social and economic significance having played an important cultural role well into the 21st century. It was, albeit it in 18th century London, initially at the forefront of the British Industrial Revolution. This required unprecedented levels of capital investment to finance the porter breweries that proved highly profitable and created long lasting brewing family dynasties such as Whitbread. This pattern was replicated in provincial 19th century England supported by an effective transport infrastructure, which led to the formation of national companies such as Bass Ratcliffe and Gretton at Burton upon Trent Staffordshire. Although the brewing sector has been covered in several trade and individual brewing company narrative histories the role of brewery management and particularly the role of accounting in the management process has remained a `mystery' (Gourvish and Wilson 1994: 397). The brewery accounting agenda has also been absent from the accounting history debates without any substantive academic work having been devoted to this important industry. The thesis has been constructed within a disciplinary framework, which has been derived from the work of the French philosopher and historian of thought Michel Foucault (1977), and developed further by the leading Foucauldian accounting historians Hoskin (1993), Hoskin and Macve (1986) and Loft (1986). Modern discipline is perceived as a duality of knowledge and power, which is exercised through disciplinary processes whereby performance and behaviour is conditioned by strategies of power. This becomes an omnipresent web of power relations which are the micro-physics of power within which Foucauldian accounting historians include the accounting discipline. This disciplinary approach is used here to explore accounting as an historical process in the English brewing industry from 1700 until 1939 as a management tool in the decision making process. Arguably this disciplinary approach will provide a body of historical accounting knowledge where none currently exists and also examine the robustness of the Foucauldian paradigm within this particular industrial context. It will be shown that this approach unsuccessfully explains accountings role within the English brewing industry between 1700 and 1939

    Anglo-American poetry and Japan, 1900-1950: A critical bibliography

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    From the advent of literary Japonisme late in the nineteenth century through the literary and cultural upheavals of the twentieth century Japanese literature, visual arts, aesthetic principles, and landscapes imaginative and real have attracted the attention of many of the most remarkable and remarked upon poets of Britain and the United States. This work provides a critical and bibliographical overview of the works that constitute the textual fabric of this attraction, focusing particularly on the first half of the twentieth century, when Japan first emerged as a determinative presence in Anglo-American verse. The introduction, 'Anglo-American Poetry and the Special Case of Japan', places the work under study in historical context, and is followed by four bibliographical sections. Section A, 'Critical and Comparative Studies', provides a chronological listing of general secondary works that have addressed the use of Japanese subjects and forms in Anglo-American poetry. Section B, 'Poets Central to the Study', provides chronological listings of primary and secondary materials by and about twelve writers whose mediation of Japanese subjects and forms was most significant among Anglo-American poets active from 1900 to 1950: Conrad Aiken, Richard Aldington, Laurence Binyon, Edmund Blunden, Witter Bynner, William Empson, Arthur Davison Ficke, John Gould Fletcher, Amy Lowell, William Plomer, Ezra Pound, and W. B. Yeats. Section C, 'Other Materials', includes selected listings of works by and about other Anglo-American poets whose mediation of Japanese materials has been significant (CA), a selected listing of relevant archives (CB), and a selected listing of secondary works that focus on the larger influence of Japan in the West (CC). Section D, 'Sources of Influence and Transmission', provides a bibliographical overview of the writers and texts that have provided Anglo-American poets with many of their images and understandings of Japan and Japanese forms

    Views of the relationship between science and religion and their implications for student learning of evolutionary biology

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    Studies have shown that many students perceive clashes between scientific and religious perspectives which contribute to negative impacts on student learning of evolution. Much earlier work, at least in larger-scale studies, investigates the influence of these perspectives in the form of a binary classification of the relationship between the two (either science or religion, either biological evolution or biblical creation, either accept or reject evolution). This PhD study therefore aims to develop a new set of research tools employing multidimensional classifications of the relationships and use these to explore four facets of student learning. These consist of views of the relationship between science and religion, justifications for levels of acceptance of evolution, positions on the relationship between biological evolution and biblical creation, and conceptions of biological evolution and the nature of science in relation to the positions. In order to understand the diversity of patterns of responses, a survey-based study using a questionnaire was conducted among 327 high school students in a religiously heterogeneous context, Thailand. The study shows that, rather than subscribing to simple incompatible views, these students tended to hold compatible views of the relationship between science and religion, some form of reconciliatory position on the relationship between biological evolution and biblical creation, and intermediate levels of acceptance of evolution. In addition, it shows that those accepting evolution tended to rely on science or refuse religion as a cognitive authority; whereas, those not accepting evolution tended to rely on religion or refuse science as a cognitive authority. Furthermore, it demonstrates that many students had developed their scientific sophistication and acceptance of evolution without changing their religious beliefs through changes in their understanding of the evidence for evolution and in their view on the relationship between science and religion. However, the study also shows that those holding reconciliatory positions on the relationship between biological evolution and biblical creation tended to hold a wide range of misconceptions about evolution and the nature of science. I therefore suggest that teachers should be aware of the roles of scientific and religious perspectives in learning about evolution as well as the diversity of ways for relating them positively in the hope that this understanding would help them enhance student learning of evolution

    Зоопсихологія та порівняльна психологія

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