1,045 research outputs found

    The Importance of Reading with Children

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    This project looks at how many people are actually reading with their children outside of school and deeply assesses the benefits that reading brings to a child’s life that carry into adulthood. Durham’s Partnership for Children (2016) conducted a study that shows only 46% of parents are reading with their child every day at home. More than half of families are not receiving the benefits of reading with their child that include decreases in behavioral outbursts, increases in fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. Researchers have done many in depth studies that isolate and look for specific variables that show the benefits of reading, such as brain scans while viewing books or animations, or measuring the amount of words children know by the time they get to kindergarten, or analysing how intervention with good reading and parenting practices helps children thrive in the aforementioned areas. This project synthesized information from multiple sources and research projects into a brochure for parents to gain a more holistic view of the benefits of reading at home with their children. Taking multiple research papers and translating them from scientific language into everyday language helps parents to quickly read and understand the plethora of benefits their child would receive from being read to and with throughout their adolescence

    Reading with children : effects on reading achievement

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    Extensive Reading With Children: A Small-Scale Study

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    Treballs Finals del Grau d'Estudis Anglesos, Facultat de Filologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Curs: 2017-2018, Tutor: Elsa Tragant[spa] En este Trabajo de Final de Grado pretendo centrarme en el aprendizaje del vocabulario a través de la lectura por placer focalizado en niños de entre aproximadamente 9 y 10 años de edad. Dejando de lado el tradicional método de enseñanza en relación a la lectura, he decidido centrarme en otro método menos común para así comprobar su efectividad conocida como lectura extensiva el cual consiste en leer por placer, para disfrutar. Es un proyecto centrado en el aprendizaje del vocabulario a través de la lectura. Los estudiantes leen 4 historias cortas cada uno de las cuales se examinan antes, durante y después de estas. El objetivo es comprobar la efectividad a la hora de adquirir vocabulario utilizando el método de lectura mencionado. Palabras clave: frecuencia, exposición, léxico y repetición.[eng]This 'Treball de Fi de Grau' is focusing on the acquisition of vocabulary or new words through extensive reading in children between the years of 9 and 10 approximately. In order to avoid the naturalistic approach of learning new vocabulary established in classroom settings I chose the method of extensive reading, which is the action of reading for pleasure, in order to examine the students. It is a project centred in the learning through reading, the students are asked to read 4 different short stories each one from which they are assessed before, while and after the actual reading. The main aim of the project is to compare both the skill for the acquisition of words before and after and therefore to observe the effectiveness of extensive reading method. Keywords: frequency, exposure, lexic and repetition

    Shared storybook reading with children at family risk of dyslexia

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    Background: Shared storybook reading is an important context for language learning and often constitutes young children's first encounter with the printed word. The quality of early shared reading interactions is a known predictor of language and reading development, but few studies have examined these interactions in children at family risk of dyslexia. Methods: This exploratory study describes the quality of shared storybook reading between mothers and their 3- to 4-year-old children at family risk of dyslexia (FR; n = 18) in comparison with dyads with no known risk (no-FR; n = 13). Mother–child interactions while sharing a familiar and an unfamiliar storybook were coded for type of extra-textual talk (meaning-related talk at the concrete and abstract levels; print-related talk) and affective quality. Maternal and child language and literacy skills were considered as potential correlates of shared reading quality. Results: The linguistic and affective quality of shared reading was broadly comparable across FR and no-FR dyads, particularly when sharing a book they knew well, with large within-group variation. Mothers contributed more concrete meaning-related talk when introducing an unfamiliar book to their children; children contributed more extra-textual talk overall when sharing a familiar book. Maternal language, but not reading, skills were related to the linguistic quality of shared reading. The affective quality of reading interactions was rated more highly in dyads where mothers and children had stronger language skills. Conclusions: These results suggest that the quality of shared reading does not vary systematically as a function of children's risk of dyslexia but is related to maternal language skills. This finding needs to be replicated in a larger sample in order to better understand the risk and protective factors associated with dyslexia. Highlights: What is already known about this topic The quality of extra-textual talk during shared reading between parents and preschoolers predicts later language and literacy outcomes in typically developing children. The affective quality of early shared reading predicts children's motivation to read independently in later childhood. Children at family risk of dyslexia are more likely than their peers with no family risk to have difficulty learning to read and may show weaknesses in oral language skills. What this paper adds. The linguistic and affective quality of shared reading between mothers and preschool children is broadly similar when children are at family risk of dyslexia compared with no family risk. The type and quantity of extra-textual talk contributed by mothers and children appears to differ according to the familiarity of the storybook, but replication of the findings in a larger sample is required. The linguistic and affective quality of shared reading is related to maternal language skills. Implications for theory, policy or practice. Shared storybook reading offers rich language learning opportunities for children at family risk of dyslexia. Maternal language skills may be an important determinant of the interactional quality of shared reading. The linguistic and affective quality of shared reading is not clearly associated with maternal reading difficulties

    Handbook for Parents: How to Improve your Children\u27s Reading (Ages 9-12)

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    From this writer\u27s classroom experience, children\u27s reading achievement improves when there is cooperation between teachers and parents. This author felt that a handbook should be developed to help guide them in improving their children\u27s reading. The purpose of this project is to create a handbook which develops comprehension and vocabulary skills. Increased parental involvement in home reading with children will help the children to read better to enjoy it. Parents have powerful influence on their children in developing reading interests. This paper deals with parental participation in improving children\u27s reading from age pre-kindergarten to twelve. The handbook deals with the same topic but only for ages nine to twelve

    Learning The ABC\u27s: Family Involvement in Kindergarten Literacy

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    The present study investigated home literacy environments established through reading with children, engaging in literacy activities, and having literacy materials provided, along with families\u27 participation in literacy-related school events. One hundred one kindergarten children and their families from five classrooms in two inner-city urban elementary schools were invited to participate in the Learning the ABCs project. A total of 68 families gave consent. Participation in the project included receiving 15 weeks of Home Literacy Bags. The 68 participating children were randomly assigned into two intervention groups using cluster sampling of the five classes. Group One received weekly bags with four activities while Group Two received weekly bags with four activities, a variety of materials, and one book. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of four family involvement variables (reading with children, engaging in literacy activities, having literacy materials provided, and participating in literacy-related events at school) in predicting kindergarten students\u27 gain scores on three literacy assessments (ALRI, TERA-3, and DIBELS). The primary research question was: To what extent can kindergarten students\u27 ALRI, TERA-3, and DIBELS gain scores be explained by participation in family involvement activities? A secondary purpose of the study was to determine which of the family involvement activities was the strongest predictor of kindergarten students\u27 literacy achievement as measured by the literacy assessments. The secondary research question was: Which family involvement activity is the strongest predictor of gains in kindergarten students\u27 letter and sound knowledge and phonological awareness? Literacy assessments were implemented using a pre/post test design. The literacy gain scores served as the dependent variables and the family involvement activities served as the independent variables. Each variable set was included in a regression analysis, which was followed up with an analysis of regression structure coefficients (rs) to determine the individual variable contributions

    They Can All Sound Good

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    At one time or another every elementary classroom teacher hears a child\u27s oral reading performance which makes him/her feel uncomfortable. Hesitations, repetitions, improper use of intonation skills and word mispronunciations abound. Inconsistent rate and rhythm make comprehension of the text nearly impossible for the listener. One typically associates this type of reading with children who have below grade level reading achievement. however, this need not be the case. In rooms where teachers understand the variables of fluent texting behavior and use techniques which incorporate the principles of effective practice and learning, listeners will not be able to distinguish between the oral reading performances of the highest and lowest achievers. Differences in their performances will be minimized or eliminated

    The Effects Of Parental Reading Socialisation On The Reading Skill Performance Of Rural Primary School Students In Sarawak

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    Extant research on home literacy practices such as parental reading socialisation have demonstrated positive impacts on children in terms of academic performance. A particular aspect that sparks pedagogic importance is the scaffolding potential of reading at home to the learning of English language in non-native English Language contexts. This study aimed to examine the effects of mother’s involvement in home- reading sessions on students’ English reading skill performance in Bau, Sarawak. Prior to carrying out the intervention of reading at home with their children, 31 mothers of Bidayuh ethnicity voluntarily attended a one-day workshop to orient them to the intervention and the use of logbooks to record details of their shared readings. However, only 18 mothers conducted reading sessions with their children and submitted a total of 21 logbooks detailing the frequency and material selection for reading. Their children, consisting of primary 1 to 4 students were required to sit for a pre-test and a post-test that measure their English language reading proficiency. The test scores were analysed using the paired-sample T-test. There was a significant increase in the students’ post-test scores following the reading intervention. The results revealed that despite the low frequency of mother-child shared reading sessions, the sessions positively affected the students’ reading performance. This finding suggests that parental reading socialisation can facilitate students’ literacy development. However, the use of materials in Bidayuh as a native language as opposed to Malay or English may increase the rural parents’ participation in home-literacy activities, and encourage early literacy in children
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