223 research outputs found

    Meconopsis concatenated sequences

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    4 sequences were concatenated for analysis in the order of 1. matK; 2. nNdhF; 3. rbcL; 4 trnL-trnF

    ConvexLAR: An Extension of Least Angle Regression

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    <p>The least angle regression (LAR) was proposed by Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani in the year 2004 for continuous model selection in linear regression. It is motivated by a geometric argument and tracks a path along which the predictors enter successively and the active predictors always maintain the same absolute correlation (angle) with the residual vector. Although it gains popularity quickly, its extensions seem rare compared to the penalty methods. In this expository article, we show that the powerful geometric idea of LAR can be generalized in a fruitful way. We propose a ConvexLAR algorithm that works for any convex loss function and naturally extends to group selection and data adaptive variable selection. After simple modification, it also yields new exact path algorithms for certain penalty methods such as a convex loss function with lasso or group lasso penalty. Variable selection in recurrent event and panel count data analysis, Ada-Boost, and Gaussian graphical model is reconsidered from the ConvexLAR angle. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.</p

    Raspberrylike SiO<sub>2</sub>@Reduced Graphene Oxide@AgNP Composite Microspheres with High Aqueous Dispersity and Excellent Catalytic Activity

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    The hybridizations of functional microspheres with graphene or graphene oxide (GO) sheets often suffer from severe agglomeration behaviors, leading to poor water dispersity of the resultant composite materials. Here, we first demonstrate that the sonication-assisted self-assembly of tiny GO sheets (whose lateral size less than 200 nm) on microspheric substrates like cationic polyelectrolyte-modified SiO<sub>2</sub> microspheres could effectively overcome such a common drawback. On the basis of this facile strategy, we further developed reduced graphene oxide/silver nanoparticle composite film wrapped SiO<sub>2</sub> microspheres, which not only possessed unique raspberrylike structure and high aqueous dispersity but also exhibited exceptional catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    DataSheet1_An adaptive time stepping stiffness confinement method for solving reactor dynamics equations.docx

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    The stiffness confinement method (SCM) is frequently employed to solve the reactor dynamics equations because it confines the stiffness of the problem by frequency transformation. However, the balance between the error and efficiency of the SCM has not been well studied. This paper reports the error analysis of the SCM. The error by SCM is derived mathematically and written as integral error, driven by the integral of the frequency interpolation function. An easy-to-implement adaptive time-stepping (ATS) algorithm is proposed based on the error analysis by controlling the neutron flux amplitude error. First, a fine-step PKE is leveraged to estimate the second-order derivative of the flux amplitude-frequency, which is used to predict the error of the neutron flux amplitude. The low cost of solving the PKE incurs a negligible effect on the algorithm’s efficiency. Second, based on the error analysis, an error estimator proposed to determine an optimal time-step size for the neutron temporal-spatial equation. With a pre-set error tolerance, the ATS algorithm is exempted from the empirical selection of the time-step size in transient simulations. Numerical tests with TWIGL and modified 2D LMW benchmark problems show that the optimal time-step size effectively confines the local truncation error of the flux amplitude within the pre-set tolerance. The ATS algorithm yields a higher accuracy at a commensurate computational cost than calculations with fixed time-steps.</p

    Clinical evaluation.

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    <p><b>A: Pedigree of the five-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC).</b> Squares and circles indicate males and females, respectively. Filled symbols indicate affected members and empty symbols indicate unaffected individuals. The diagonal line indicates a deceased family member and the arrow indicates the proband. Family members whose DNA was analyzed by sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion are indicated by asterisks. <b>B: Photograph of the right eye of the proband.</b> The photograph (diffuse illumination) of the proband (V: 1) before surgery shows a posterior polar cataract with cotton-like opacities in the posterior subcapsular cortex. The same phenotype was noted bilaterally.</p

    Confirmation of the c.451_452insGACT (p.Tyr151*) insertion mutation of <i>CRYGD</i>.

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    <p>(A) Sequence chromatogram showing the heterozygous c.451_452insGACT insertion mutation of <i>CRYGD</i> in the proband. The mutation was numbered according to GenBank NM_006891.3. (B) Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showing different sizes of the PCR fragments in the pedigree. The 134 bp and 130 bp fragments were amplified from affected and unaffected chromosome, respectively. (C) Protein alignment of mammalian samples showing that the regions around the mutation are highly conserved. Numbers on left and right indicate the position of this fragment. The position of the mutant is marked by a black triangle.</p

    Western blot analysis of CRYGD over-expression in HEK293T cells.

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    <p>(A) The truncated CRYGD showed decreased solubility. In the supernatant, the mutant protein was truncated and was present in much lower amounts than the wildtype. In the precipitant, there was more mutant protein and the wildtype was not detected. (B) Quantification by band densitometry indicated the prominent reduction of mutant CRYGD in the supernatant (p<0.05).</p

    A Novel Insertion Variant of <i>CRYGD</i> Is Associated with Congenital Nuclear Cataract in a Chinese Family

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    <div><p>Objective</p><p>To investigate a novel insertion variant of <i>CRYGD</i> identified in a Chinese family with nuclear congenital cataract.</p><p>Methods</p><p>A Chinese family with congenital nuclear cataract was recruited for the mutational screening of candidate genes by direct sequencing. Recombinant N-terminal Myc tagged wildtype or mutant CRYGD was expressed in HEK293T cells. The expression pattern, protein solubility and subcellular distribution were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence.</p><p>Principal Findings</p><p>A novel insertion variant, c.451_452insGACT, in <i>CRYGD</i> was identified in the patients. It causes a frameshift and a premature termination of the polypeptide to become Y151*. A significantly reduced solubility was observed for this mutant. Unlike wildtype CRYGD, which existed mainly in the cytoplasm, Y151* was mis-located in the nucleus.</p><p>Conclusions</p><p>We have identified a novel mutation, c.451_452insGACT, in <i>CRYGD</i>, which is associated with nuclear cataract. This is the first insertion mutation of <i>CRYGD</i> found to cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. The mutant protein, with loss of solubility and localization to the nucleus, is hypothesized to be the major cause of cataract in these patients.</p></div

    Bioinformatics analysis of the mutant CRYGD Y151*.

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    <p>(A) The predicted secondary structure showing the reduced extended strand and random coil in the mutant. (B) The C-terminal domain of the truncated CRYGD favors the unfolded state. The residue-specific stability constant (K<sub>f</sub>) for each residue of the protein was predicted by the BEST/COREX server.</p

    Localization of Myc-tagged wildtype or Y151* CRYGD in HEK293T cells.

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    <p>Immunofluorescence of Myc (green fluorescence) showed the distribution of wildtype CRYGD in both cytomembrane and cytoplasm. However, the mutant CRYGD was mainly localized in the nucleus, in the form of granular deposits. Scale bar: 10 μm.</p
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