434 research outputs found

    ’Rich and Strange’: Christina Stead and the Australian Transnational Novel

    Full text link

    Consultation with children and young people with experience of domestic abuse on Scottish Government National Domestic Abuse Delivery Group draft proposals : main report

    Get PDF
    Findings and Conclusions: Major Themes ‱ There was support in principle from young people for all of the proposals ‱ Young people gave careful consideration to the proposals and to how they might operate in practice; they expressed some caution about supporting them unreservedly until it was demonstrated they would work in practice ‱ In relation to all of the proposals young people had concerns about confidentiality and privacy, about to the ability to control the flow of personal information, and there were concerns about trust ‱ Participants expressed the importance of the proposals contributing to young people being and feeling safe

    Scotland's Children Bill: why the law needs to protect the rights of the child when parents separate

    Get PDF
    First paragraph: Divorce and separation affects many families, and following a breakup, most make their own arrangements about where children will live and how their relationships with each parent will work. But some families struggle with this, especially if there are issues like domestic abuse or other concerns about children’s welfare.https://theconversation.com/scotlands-children-bill-why-the-law-needs-to-protect-the-rights-of-the-child-when-parents-separate-13918

    Editor's Preface

    Get PDF

    “A GREAT PROGRAM... FOR ME AS A GRAMMA”: CAREGIVERS EVALUATE A FAMILY LITERACY INITIATIVE

    Get PDF
    In this article, we report a study in which we asked 137 parents and caregivers to evaluate a year‐long family literacy program in which they participated. Parents valued the insights they gained about children’s learning in general and literacy development in particular. They reported that they learned from each other as well as from the program facilitators; valued especially the structure of the program wherein they spent time working with children in classrooms; felt more included in the school community; and enhanced their self‐esteem and their ability to advocate for their families. Key words: families, literacy, school, family literacy, Parents As Literacy Supporters (PALS) Les auteurs prĂ©sentent les rĂ©sultats d’une recherche durant laquelle ils ont demandĂ© Ă  137 parents et ou tuteurs d’évaluer un programme de littĂ©ratie familiale auquel ils avaient participĂ© durant un an. Les parents se sont dits heureux d’avoir pu ainsi mieux comprendre comment leurs enfants apprennent en gĂ©nĂ©ral et en particulier comment leur littĂ©ratie se dĂ©veloppe. Ils ont signalĂ© qu’ils ont appris de leur enfant et vice versa ainsi que des facilitateurs. Ils ont aimĂ© la structure du programme qui leur a permis de travailler avec les enfants en classe. Ils se sentent ainsi davantage impliquĂ©s dans l’école et l’expĂ©rience leur a permis d’avoir plus confiance en eux‐ mĂȘmes et en leur aptitude Ă  se faire les avocats de leur famille. Mots clĂ©s : familles, littĂ©ratie, Ă©cole, littĂ©ratie familiale, Parents As Literacy Supporters (PALS)

    “A GREAT PROGRAM... FOR ME AS A GRAMMA”: CAREGIVERS EVALUATE A FAMILY LITERACY INITIATIVE

    Get PDF
    In this article, we report a study in which we asked 137 parents and caregivers to evaluate a year‐long family literacy program in which they participated. Parents valued the insights they gained about children’s learning in general and literacy development in particular. They reported that they learned from each other as well as from the program facilitators; valued especially the structure of the program wherein they spent time working with children in classrooms; felt more included in the school community; and enhanced their self‐esteem and their ability to advocate for their families. Key words: families, literacy, school, family literacy, Parents As Literacy Supporters (PALS) Les auteurs prĂ©sentent les rĂ©sultats d’une recherche durant laquelle ils ont demandĂ© Ă  137 parents et ou tuteurs d’évaluer un programme de littĂ©ratie familiale auquel ils avaient participĂ© durant un an. Les parents se sont dits heureux d’avoir pu ainsi mieux comprendre comment leurs enfants apprennent en gĂ©nĂ©ral et en particulier comment leur littĂ©ratie se dĂ©veloppe. Ils ont signalĂ© qu’ils ont appris de leur enfant et vice versa ainsi que des facilitateurs. Ils ont aimĂ© la structure du programme qui leur a permis de travailler avec les enfants en classe. Ils se sentent ainsi davantage impliquĂ©s dans l’école et l’expĂ©rience leur a permis d’avoir plus confiance en eux‐ mĂȘmes et en leur aptitude Ă  se faire les avocats de leur famille. Mots clĂ©s : familles, littĂ©ratie, Ă©cole, littĂ©ratie familiale, Parents As Literacy Supporters (PALS)

    Prevalence and social inequality in experiences of domestic abuse among mothers of young children:A study using national survey data from Scotland

    Get PDF
    Domestic abuse is a pernicious societal issue that has both short- and long-term consequences for those who are victimized. Research points to motherhood being linked to women’s victimization, with pregnancy being a particular point of risk. Across UK jurisdictions, new legislation aims to extend the criminalization of domestic abuse to include coercive control. Less clear is the relationship between mothers’ victimization of different “types” of abuse and other factors such as age, socioeconomic status, and level of education. The article makes an original contribution to knowledge by addressing these limitations of the existing literature. Using nationally representative data from a Scottish longitudinal survey (N = 3,633) into children’s development this article investigates the social stratification of mothers’ exposure to different types of abuse, including coercive control, physical abuse, and threats. Overall, 14% of mothers report experiencing any type of domestic abuse since the birth of the study child (age 6), of which 7% experienced physical abuse. Compared to mothers in the highest income households, mothers in the lowest income quintile were far more likely to experience any form of abuse (Logistic Regression, OR = 3.55), more likely to have experienced more types of abuse and to have experienced these more often (OR = 5.54). Age had a protective effect, with mothers aged 20 or younger at most risk of abuse (OR = 2.60 compared to mothers aged 40+). Interaction effects between age and income suggested that an intersectional lens may help explain the cumulative layers of difficulty which young mothers on low incomes may find themselves in when it comes to abusive partners. The pattern of social stratification remained the same when comparing different types of abuse. Mothers of boys were more likely to experience abuse, and to experience more types of abuse, more often. We reflect on how these findings could inform existing policy interventions.Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Onlin
    • 

    corecore