295 research outputs found

    Assessing Intergenerational Earnings Persistence among German Workers

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    In this study we assess the relationship between father and son earnings among (West) German Workers. To reduce the lifecycle and attenuation bias a novel sampling procedure is developed and applied to the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) 1984-2006. Our preferred point estimate indicates an intergenerational earnings elasticity of 1/3 .Intergenerational Mobility, Lifecycle, Permanent Earnings, Wages

    Self-Productivity in Early Childhood

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    Self-productivity is a crucial feature in the process of skill formation. It means that skills and health acquired at one stage in the life cycle enhance skills and health formation at later stages. This paper presents an empirical investigation of self-productivity in early childhood in Germany. The data are drawn from the mother-child questionnaire of the German Socio-Economic Panel for the birth cohorts 2002-2005. The magnitude of self-productivity varies between skills and over time. A one percent increase in birth weight increase child's noncognitive skills by 0.34 percent and child's health by 0.64 percent at the age of 3-18 months. Until the age of 42 months a one percent increases in child's noncognitive skills enhances child's verbal skills by 0.57 percent and child's everyday skills by 1.04 percent. Furthermore, our estimates suggest synergies between child's health and child's noncognitive skills. --self-productivity,early childhood,skill formation,birth weight,health

    Rising Wage Inequality in Germany

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    This paper investigates the evolution of wages and the recent tendency to rising wage inequality in Germany, based on the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) for 1984 to 2004. Between 1984 and 1994 the wage distribution was fairly stable. Wage inequality started to increase around 1994 in Germany for all workers and for prime age dependent male workers as well. Rising inequality is not the result of the recent rise in self-employment. In West Germany rising inequality occurred in the lower part of the wage distribution, in East Germany in the upper part of the wage distribution. While residual wage inequality accounted for two-thirds of rising wage inequality in West Germany, in East Germany price effects dominated. In West Germany the group of workers with low tenure experienced higher inequality. --Education,tenure,skill composition,wage inequality,wage rigidity

    Age-dependent Skill Formation and Returns to Education

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    In this study, we try to connect the economic literature on human capital formation with findings from neurobiology and psychology on early childhood development and self-regulation. Our basic framework for assessing the distribution of agespecific returns to investment in skills is an elaboration of the model of skill formation from Cunha, Heckman et al. (2006) over the life cycle. Our simulation based evidence illustrates the cumulative and synergetic nature of skill formation, the skill multiplier and the shaping role early childhood has for human capital formation, growth and inequality. --Intelligence,self-regulation,human capital,returns to education,life span

    Planning for self-employment at the beginning of a market economy: evidence from individual data of East German workers

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    We investigate the plans of individual workers concerning future self-employment in the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany) shortly before the economic, monetary and social union in June/July 1990. Our data base is the Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) East. We find that the desire to become an entrepreneur is basically determined by individual and household characteristics, including income and asset indicators, and not as much by the current job situation of the individual. Furthermore, we find evidence of barriers to entry which may come from capital market constraints and institutional restrictions. Due to the ordinal nature of the answers, we used the ordinal logit model for estimation. The corresponding stochastic assumptions are tested extensively using pseudo-Lagrange multiplier tests against omitted variables, non-linearity, asymmetry of distribution, and heteroscedasticity. --

    Employment impacts of cleaner production: evidence from a German study using case studies and surveys

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    The study assesses net employment effects of technical progress which can be expected by the ongoing transition from end-of-pipe technologies towards cleaner production. Empirical evidence is presented on the basis of case studies and panel data including a telephone survey in German industry. The main result ist that cleaner production leads in more firms to a net creation of jobs than end-of-pipe technologies. However, eco-innovations like other innovations tend to require higher qualification. Thus, the demand for skilled and high-skilled labour rises while the demand for unskilled labour decreases. The results imply that supporting cleaner production is not in conflict with labour market policy. Synergies are identified, they are however small and specific. Thus, technology policy in general and supporting cleaner production in particular can not be expected to give substantial contributions to the solution of mass unemployment in Germany without using additional instruments (e.g. concerning a reduction of labour costs, increasing flexibility of labour markets). --

    Rising Wage Inequality in Germany

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    The paper investigates the evolution of wages and wage inequality in Germany based on samples from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) 1984 to 2005. Real gross hourly wages for prime age dependent male workers increased on average by 23 percent between 1984 and 1994 in West Germany and the wage distribution was fairly stable. Between 1994 and 2005 average wages increased by 7 percent in West Germany and 18 percent in East Germany. In this period wage inequality, measured by the ratio of the ninetieth to tenth percentile of the wage distribution, increased from 2.5 to 3.1 in West Germany and from 2.4 to 3.2 in East Germany. In West Germany rising wage inequality occurred mainly in the lower part of the wage distribution, whereas in East Germany wage inequality predominantly increased in the upper part of the wage distribution. In West Germany the group of workers with low tenure experienced higher increases in wage inequality compared to the group of workers with high tenure. --Wage Inequality,Skill Structure,Real Wages,Tenure

    Self-Productivity in Early Childhood

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    Self-productivity is a crucial feature in the process of skill formation. It means that skills and health acquired at one stage in the life cycle enhance skills and health formation at later stages. This paper presents an empirical investigation of self-productivity in early childhood in Germany. The data are drawn from the mother-child questionnaire of the German Socio-Economic Panel for the birth cohorts 2002-2005. The magnitude of self-productivity varies between skills and over time. A one percent increase in birth weight increase child's noncognitive skills by 0.34 percent and child's health by 0.64 percent at the age of 3-18 months. Until the age of 42 months a one percent increases in child's noncognitive skills enhances child's verbal skills by 0.57 percent and child's everyday skills by 1.04 percent. Furthermore, our estimates suggest synergies between child's health and child's noncognitive skills.self-productivity, early childhood, skill formation, birth weight, health
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