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Environmental Sensitivity: Inquiry Into a Possible Link with Apparitional Experience

By Michael Jawer

Abstract

Psi researchers often use the term ‘sensitivity’ when theorizing that certain persons may be more apt to register anomalous influences than others. Through a review of the literature, it is argued that some individuals are disposed toward a range of innate sensitivities that, in novelty as well as intensity, distinguish them from the general population. It is hypothesized that such persons will exhibit greater susceptibility to a range of environmental factors including allergies, migraine headache, chronic pain and chronic fatigue. Furthermore, it is suggested that sensitive individuals will report a higher than average degree of psi perception as well as apparent electromagnetic influence. Through a 54-item survey designed by the author, the following issues are evaluated: the extent to which persons who describe themselves as ‘sensitive’ appear to be affected by such factors; whether their immediate family members may be similarly affected; to what extent environmental sensitivity parallels apparitional experience; and how such findings compare or contrast with questions asked of a control group. Based on both the literature and the survey results, the author argues that sensitivity is a bona fide neurobiological phenomenon. While no single factor in a person's background is likely to distinguish him/her as ‘sensitive,’ eight demographic or personality factors are found to be statistically significant. If further studies were to document similar results, a more tangible basis would be provided for the study of apparitional experience than has been possible to date

Topics: Perceptual Cognitive Psychology
Publisher: Society for Psychical Research
Year: 2006
OAI identifier: oai:cogprints.org:4846
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