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Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV

By Smriti Naswa and Y. S. Marfatia

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an experimental approach to HIV prevention and consists of antiretroviral drugs to be taken before potential HIV exposure in order to reduce the risk of HIV infection and continued during periods of risk. An effective PrEP could provide an additional safety net to sexually active persons at risk, when combined with other prevention strategies. Women represent nearly 60% of adults infected with HIV and PrEP can be a female-controlled prevention method for women who are unable to negotiate condom use. Two antiretroviral nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs are currently under trial as PrEP drugs, namely tenofovirdisoproxilfumarate (TDF) alone and TDF in combination with emricitabine (FTC), to be taken as daily single dose oral drugs. There are 11 ongoing trials of ARV-based prevention in different at risk populations across the world. The iPrex trial showed that daily use of oral TDF/FTC by MSM resulted in 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV. This led to publication of interim guidance by CDC to use of PrEP by health providers for MSM. Few other trials are Bangkok Tenofovir Study, Partners PrEP Study, FEM-PrEP study, and VOICE (MTN-003) study. Future trials are being formulated for intermittent PrEP (iPrEP) where drugs are taken before and after sex, “stand-in dose” iPrEP, vaginal or rectal PrEP, etc. There are various issues/concerns with PrEP such as ADRs and resistance to TDF/FTC, adherence to drugs, acceptability, sexual disinhibition, use of PrEP as first line of defense for HIV without other prevention strategies, and cost. The PrEP has a potential to address unmet need in public health if delivered as a part of comprehensive toolkit of prevention services, including risk-reduction, correct and consistent use of condoms, and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections

Topics: Review Article
Publisher: Medknow Publications
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:3139281
Provided by: PubMed Central
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