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Unusual cause of exercise-induced ventricular fibrillation in a well-trained adult endurance athlete: a case report

By Stefan Vogt, Daniel Koenig, Stephan Prettin, Torben Pottgiesser, Juergen Allgeier, Hans-Hermann Dickhuth and Anja Hirschmueller
Topics: Case Report
Publisher: BioMed Central
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2365969
Provided by: PubMed Central

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