Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Global environmental (in)equity and the cosmopolitan project

By Lorraine M. Elliott

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between economic globalisation and environmental inequity which is defined in terms of transnational harm and injustice. It argues that globalisation has been neither normatively neutral nor materially benign in its environmental consequences. The global politics of the environment has therefore come to be characterised by inequities in the use of resources and production of waste, in environmental impact, and in access to the structures of environmental governance at a local and global level. In effect, the lives of others-beyond-borders are shaped without their participation or consent. Drawing on cosmopolitanism as an ethical and political practice suggests that at least three conditions are essential for an equitable and just form of global environmental governance: recognition of equal moral obligation across borders, compensatory burden-sharing and a politics of consent. However, actual global practice on the environment has fallen short on each, complicated and compromised by uncertainty over the role of the state as moral agent in a globalised world

Topics: JZ
Publisher: University of Warwick. Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation
Year: 2002
OAI identifier: oai:wrap.warwick.ac.uk:2023

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (1993). A tale of two forests’ in Ronnie D. Lipschutz and Ken Conca (eds) The state and social power in global environmental politics, doi
  2. (2001). An ecological ethics for the present: three approaches to the central question’ in in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  3. (1990). Between two worlds: science, the environmental movement and policy choice, Cambridge: doi
  4. (2000). Bounded and cosmopolitan justice’, doi
  5. (1998). Citizenship and sovereignty in the post-Westphalian European state’ in Daniele Archibugi, David Held and Martin Köhler (eds) Re-imagining political community: studies in cosmopolitan democracy, doi
  6. (1998). Cosmopolitan citizenship’, doi
  7. (1997). Cosmopolitan democracy and the global order: a new agenda’ in James Bohman and Matthias Lutz-Backmann (eds) Perpetual peace: essays on Kant’s cosmopolitan ideal, doi
  8. (2000). Cosmopolitanism and organised violence’, paper prepared Conceiving Cosmopolitanism, conference at the University of Warwick,
  9. (2001). Defending the ‘other’” military force(s) and the cosmopolitan project, paper presented to the Chief of Army Land Warfare Conference, Future Armies Future Challenges: Land Warfare in the Information Age, Australian Defence Force Academy,
  10. (1997). Democracy beyond borders? Globalisation and the reconstruction of democratic theory and practice’ in Anthony McGrew (ed.) The transformation of democracy? Milton Keynes: The Open University.
  11. (1999). Democracy beyond the state: a cosmopolitical manifesto’,
  12. (1993). Development assistance institutions and sustainable development’, doi
  13. (1997). Earth summit review ends with few commitments’,
  14. (2001). Environmental justice and global democracy’, in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  15. (2001). Environmental security: the search for strategic legitimacy’, doi
  16. (1989). General Assembly doi
  17. (1998). Global civil society: perspectives, initiatives, movements’, doi
  18. (1999). Global ecological democracy’ in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  19. (1999). Global environment and international inequality’, doi
  20. (1991). Global environmental and natural resource problems – their economic, political and security implications’, doi
  21. (1998). Global environmental change and global inequality: North/South perspectives’, doi
  22. (2001). Global governance: a report card for the United Nations, Manchester Papers
  23. (1997). Globalisation and territorial democracy: an introduction’ in Anthony McGrew (ed.) The transformation of democracy? Milton Keynes: The Open University.
  24. (2001). Human rights and the environment: redefining fundamental principles? in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  25. (2001). Humane governance and the environment: overcoming neo-liberalism’ in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  26. (1995). Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change doi
  27. (1991). International environmental law’,
  28. (2000). Moral complexity and the international society’, doi
  29. (2001). Planetary citizenship: the definition and defence of an ideal’ in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  30. (1998). Principles of cosmopolitan democracy’ in Daniele Archibugi, David Held and Martin Köhler (eds) Re-imagining political community: studies in cosmopolitan democracy, doi
  31. (1998). Re-orienting state sovereignty: rights and responsibilities in the environmental age’
  32. (1997). Sovereignty in world ecopolitics’, doi
  33. (2000). Sustainable development information service: global trends, Washington DC: World Resources Institute; www.wri.org/trends/index.html; accessed 26
  34. (1993). Swords into ploughshares: agenda for change in the developing world’, doi
  35. (1996). The complexities of humanitarian intervention: a new world order challenge’, doi
  36. (2000). The cosmopolitical perspective: sociology of the second age of modernity’, doi
  37. (1999). The evolving spheres of international justice’, doi
  38. (1996). The global politics of forest conservation since the UNCED', doi
  39. (1998). The global politics of the environment, doi
  40. (1993). The greening of the global reach’ in Wolfgang Sachs (ed.) Global ecology: a new arena of political conflict, doi
  41. (2001). The politics of cosmopolitical democracy’ in Brendan Gleeson and Nicholas Low (eds) Governing for the environment: global problems, ethics and democracy, doi
  42. (1998). The transformation of political community: ethical foundations of the post-Westphalian era, doi
  43. (1997). Towards a cosmopolitan public sphere’, doi
  44. (1991). Tropical forests’ in Robin Churchill and David Freestone (eds) International law and climate change,
  45. (1987). World Commission on Environment and Development doi

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.