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The crystal structure of d-lactate dehydrogenase, a peripheral membrane respiratory enzyme

By Orly Dym, Elizabeth Ann Pratt, Chien Ho and David Eisenberg

Abstract

d-Lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH) of Escherichia coli is a peripheral membrane respiratory enzyme involved in electron transfer, located on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane. d-LDH catalyzes the oxidation of d-lactate to pyruvate, which is coupled to transmembrane transport of amino acids and sugars. Here we describe the crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution of the three domains of d-LDH: the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding domain, the cap domain, and the membrane-binding domain. The FAD-binding domain contains the site of d-lactate reduction by a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor and has an overall fold similar to other members of a recently discovered FAD-containing family of proteins. This structural similarity extends to the cap domain as well. The most prominent difference between d-LDH and the other members of the FAD-containing family is the membrane-binding domain, which is either absent in some of these proteins or differs significantly. The d-LDH membrane-binding domain presents an electropositive surface with six Arg and five Lys residues, which presumably interacts with the negatively charged phospholipid head groups of the membrane. Thus, d-LDH appears to bind the membrane through electrostatic rather than hydrophobic forces

Topics: Biological Sciences
Publisher: The National Academy of Sciences
Year: 2000
DOI identifier: 10.1073/pnas.97.17.9413
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:16878
Provided by: PubMed Central
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