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DOI 10.1007/s10071-004-0239-6 ORIGINAL ARTICLE

By Victoria Horner, Andrew Whiten, V. Horner and A. Whiten

Abstract

Abstract This study explored whether the tendency of chimpanzees and children to use emulation or imitation to solve a tool-using task was a response to the availability of causal information. Young wild-born chimpanzees from an African sanctuary and 3- to 4-year-old children observed a human demonstrator use a tool to retrieve a reward from a puzzle-box. The demonstration involved both causally relevant and irrelevant actions, and the box was presented in each of two conditions: opaque and clear. In the opaque condition, causal information about the effect of the tool inside the box was not available, and hence it was impossible to differentiate between the relevant and irrelevant parts of the demonstration. However, in the clear condition causal information was available, and subjects could potentially determine which actions were necessary

Year: 2013
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.372.5825
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