Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Accounting for ministers: scandal and survival in British government 1945–2007

By Samuel Berlinski, Torun Dewan and Keith Dowding

Abstract

Accounting for Ministers uses the tools of modern political science to analyse the factors which determine the fortunes of Cabinet ministers. Utilising agency theory, it describes Cabinet government as a system of incentives for prime ministerial and parliamentary rule. The authors use a unique dataset of ministers from 1945 to 2007 to examine the structural and individual characteristics that lead to the selection and durability of ministers. Sensitive to historical context, it describes the unique features of different Prime Ministers and the sorts of issues and scandals that lead to the forced exit of ministers. The authors identify the structural factors that determine ministerial performance and tenure, seeing resignation calls as performance indicators. Probing the nature of individual and collective responsibility within Westminster forms of government, its rigorous analysis provides powerful new insights into the nature of Cabinet government

Topics: D839 Post-war History, 1945 on, JC Political theory, JN101 Great Britain
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Year: 2012
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:41559
Provided by: LSE Research Online
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://www.cambridge.org (external link)
  • http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/41559... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.