Location of Repository

WHAT’S LEFT OF ‘STATE CAPACITY’? THE DEVELOPMENTAL STATE AFTER GLOBALISATION AND THE EAST ASIAN CRISIS

By Jonathan Perraton

Abstract

The great majority of proponents of the developmental state see few negative implications in recent globalisation trends. Globalisation in general is often held to be exaggerated and it may actually increase the possible gains from state activism. The East Asian crisis is largely seen as a temporary aberration. This paper argues that the implications of these trends are more profound. It argues that globalisation processes have acted to reduce the efficacy of policy instruments traditionally used by developmental states. Key problems arise from the theory of the developmental state. Whilst strong country case study work has been produced, few more general principles have been drawn from this and those that have been can be challenged. The arguments for the continued viability of the developmental state often conflate positive and normative elements

Year: 2002
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.195.8032
Provided by: CiteSeerX
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/v... (external link)
  • http://www.shef.ac.uk/~perc/de... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.