Location of Repository

Secondary traumatisation and post-traumatic growth: how are employees of charities who provide practical support to asylum seekers affected by their work?

By Kara Louise Davey

Abstract

Asylum claims in developing countries are increasing as a result of conflict and resource competition. As claims have increased and have included some non-genuine claims that have made headlines, concerns about the number of non-genuine claims have been used to justify increased stringency of legislation and policies relevant to the process of seeking asylum. This thesis explores both the psychological consequences of current asylum legislation on asylum seekers and the psychological consequences of supporting asylum seekers and refugees to meet the requirements of UK law.\ud The literature review systemically reviewed studies investigating the psychological impact of awaiting an asylum decision and discussed the possible explanatory factors. For those awaiting their decision, the process was associated with increased psychological distress, compared to individuals no longer awaiting a decision. Distress also appeared to increase as a function of duration of wait. Uncertainty was commonly proposed as instrumental to asylum seekers' psychological distress. All studies highlighted that current policies and legislation adversely affect asylum seeker's psychological well-being and it is argued that change is required, reducing time taken for asylum claims.\ud The empirical study explored positive and negative effects on charity-employed staff supporting asylum seekers and refugees. Secondary traumatic stress (STS) and post-traumatic growth (PTG) were assessed in staff working for charities that provide practical support to asylum seekers/ refugees across the UK. Measures of team support, organisational, social support, empathy, personal characteristics and ways of coping were also assessed. High levels of STS and low levels of PTG were found, potentially highlighting the need for strategies to mitigate distress for individuals providing practical support to asylum seekers and refugees.\ud Collectively, this thesis suggests that the current asylum process is associated with both direct and indirect psychological consequences, which are prominent and aversive. Suggestions for future research and possible interventions are provided

Publisher: University of Leicester
Year: 2011
OAI identifier: oai:lra.le.ac.uk:2381/9882

Suggested articles

Preview

Citations

  1. Accept sympathy and understanding from someone……………….
  2. Accept the next best thing to what
  3. Apologise or do something to make it up………………………….
  4. (2009). Appendix M: Range of respondents adversarial growth scores as measured by the PGTI Appendix N: Ethics letter Appendix P: Chronology of research process
  5. Change or grow as a person in a good way…………………………
  6. Even if I did the best job possible, the organisation would fail to notice…………………
  7. Express anger to the person(s) who caused the problem…………..
  8. Feel inspired to do something creative………………………….......
  9. Get professional help (see a counsellor/ therapist)………………….
  10. I agree to my interview with the researcher being audio taped. This audio Appendix J: Interview Schedule
  11. I am aware of what my participation will involve.
  12. I am judgmental and opinionated………………….
  13. I attempt to explore and clarify their feelings………
  14. I do not focus on solutions/ not answer direct questions or
  15. I explore the personal meanings of their feelings….
  16. I ignore their verbal and non-verbal communication.. doi
  17. I interrupt and seem in a hurry……………………...
  18. I provide the client with direction………………….
  19. I respond to their feelings and the meaning of those feelings………………………………………………… doi
  20. I respond to their feelings…….…………………… doi
  21. I understand that my participation is voluntary and is not linked to my employment in anyway.
  22. I use an appropriate voice tone, sound relaxed……..
  23. I use an inappropriate voice tone, sound curt……….
  24. Make a plan of action and follow it………………………………..
  25. Sleep more than usual……………………………………………… doi
  26. (2009). Staff Support Groups in the Helping Professions: Principles, Practice doi
  27. Tell myself things that help me to feel better……………………….
  28. The organisation cares about my general satisfaction at work……………………………...
  29. The organisation cares about my well-being
  30. The organisation fails to appreciate any extra effort from
  31. The organisation shows little concern for me
  32. The organisation values my contribution…
  33. The organisation would ignore any complaint that
  34. Try to forget the whole thing………………………………………..
  35. Wait to see what will happen before doing anything………………
  36. What do you think could be done to help and support individuals like yourself who support asylum seekers? that you support. Nearly Frequently Quite Often Occasionally Seldom Never Always Like Like Like Like Like Like

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.