Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

'No surrender to the Taliban!': Football hooliganism, Islamophobia and the rise of the English Defence League

By Jon Garland and James Treadwell

Abstract

This is the original published paper. It is reproduced here with the publisher's permission. It is also available at: http://www.britsoccrim.org/v10.htmOn a number of occasions throughout 2009 and 2010 violent clashes occurred between white and Asian males, anti-fascist demonstrators and the police in city centres in the United Kingdom. These disturbances involved a new organisation, the English Defence League (EDL), which claims to oppose ‘radical Islam’. This article charts the growth of the EDL and the affiliated Casuals United, and examines their motivations and ideologies. It assesses their links with football hooligan ‘firms’, and whether these links mean that the EDL has a large pool of violent ‘foot soldiers’ at its disposal, and concludes that the EDL’s Islamophobic views and provocative street army tactics mean that it poses the most serious threat to public order and community cohesion since the heyday of the National Front in the 1970s

Topics: English Defence League, Casuals United, Islamophobia, Media, Far-Right, Football Hooliganism, Public Order
Publisher: British Society of Criminology
Year: 2010
OAI identifier: oai:lra.le.ac.uk:2381/8966
Journal:

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (2004). After Empire: Melancholia or Convivial Culture? doi
  2. (2009). Aggravating Racism and Elusive Motivation’, doi
  3. BBC (2009a) File on Four,
  4. (2008). Call the (Fashion) Police: How Fashion Becomes Criminalised’,
  5. (2008). Contemporary British Fascism: doi
  6. (2009). English “Defenders” Try to Recruit Football Fans’,
  7. (2009). English Defence League: Chaotic Alliance of Far Right Groups Stirs Up Trouble on Streets: Football Fans are Being Recruited to Join Protests against Muslims. How Worried Should the Authorities Be?’,
  8. (2005). Football Hooliganism, doi
  9. (1998). Football Hooligans: Knowing the Score, doi
  10. (2009). Hate Crime: Impact, Causes and Responses, doi
  11. (2009). I’m a Muslim, But I’m Not a Terrorist’: Victimisation, Risky Identities and the Performance of Safety’, doi
  12. (2006). is a Lecturer in Criminology at the Department of Criminology, University of Leicester. His best known publication is Criminology (Sage,
  13. (2005). Liberty’s Response to the Home Office Consultation on the Draft Manual on Stop and Search,
  14. (2009). Message for John Denham’, Available at: http://www.englishdefenceleague.org/message-to-john-denham-from-theenglish-defence-league.html English Defence League
  15. (2009). Race Riot Flared after Muslims Were Urged to Confront Right-wing Protests’, The Times,
  16. (2001). Racism and Anti-racism in Football, doi
  17. (2010). Racism and Ethnicity: Global Debates, doi
  18. (2009). Right-wing Marchers Clash with Police in
  19. (2009). Sensationalism is a Gift to Extremists’, The Guardian, 12 August, Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/aug/12/birminghamriots-extremism-media
  20. (2009). Sleepwalking to Segregation?’ Challenging Myths about Race and Migration, doi
  21. (2008). The End of Multiculturalism? Terrorism, Integration and Human Rights, doi
  22. (2009). The English Defence League: Will the Flames of Hatred Spread?’,
  23. (1997). The Perpetrators of Racial Harassment and Racial Violence, Home Office Research Study 176, London: Home Office.
  24. (2010). UK: The Veil and the Politics of Racism’, doi
  25. (2009). Well Connected: English Defence League Remix – A Familiar Tune’,
  26. (2001). White Riot: The Violent Story of Combat 18,
  27. (2009). Who Are We? Available at: http://casualsunited.webs.com/whoarewe.htm Chakraborti,

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.