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The impact of job loss on family mental health

By Silvia Mendolia

Abstract

Preprin

Topics: job loss, mental health, income shock, psychological well-being, HB Economic Theory, HB
Publisher: University of Aberdeen Business School
Year: 2011
OAI identifier: oai:aura.abdn.ac.uk:2164/2198

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