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"Gis a job": what use geographical information systems in spatial economics?

By Henry G. Overman

Abstract

Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are used for inputting, storing, managing, analysing and mapping spatial data. This article argues that each of these functions can help researchers interested in spatial economics. In addition, GIS provide access to new data which is both interesting in its own right, but also as a source of exogenous variation

Topics: GA Mathematical geography. Cartography, HC Economic History and Conditions
Publisher: Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC), London School of Economics and Political Science
Year: 2009
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:33247
Provided by: LSE Research Online

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