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The impact of organizational context on work team effectiveness: a study of production and engineering teams

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Graduation date: 2001Teams are an integral part of organizations today. This research explored the relationships between nine organizational context variables, team processes, and three measures of team effectiveness. The research was conducted within one business unit\ud of a Fortune 50, high-technology company, Intact production and engineering work teams from manufacturing organizations were the focus of the study.\ud A team survey was developed and used to provide team-level assessments of the nine organizational context variables, team processes, and team member satisfaction. Team leader and manager surveys were developed and used to provide independent evaluations of team effectiveness. Correlational and path analyses were used to test for direct and mediated relationships between organizational context variables, team processes, and measures of team effectiveness.\ud For the production teams studied, significant direct relationships between six organizational context factors and two measures of team effectiveness were found. The management processes associated with establishing a clear team purpose that is aligned with organizational goals and the allocation of critical resources were both positively related to team member satisfaction. An organizational culture that\ud supports communication and cooperation between teams and the integration of teams\ud was found to have a significant and positive linear relationship with both team leader ratings of effectiveness and team member satisfaction. Organizational systems that provide teams with the necessary information were found to have a significant and positive linear relationship with both team leader ratings of effectiveness and team member satisfaction. Organizational systems that provide teams with the necessary training were found to have a significant and positive linear relationship with team member satisfaction.\ud For engineering teams, the findings support both direct and mediated relationships between seven organizational context variables, team processes, and two measures of effectiveness. Team processes were found to mediate the relationships between six organizational context variables and team member satisfaction. The mediated organizational context variables were resource allocation, support for teams and teamwork, team integration, team-level feedback and recognition, information availability, and training. There was also support for direct relationships between clear goals, team integration, and information availability and team leader ratings of effectiveness

Year: 2001
OAI identifier: oai:ir.library.oregonstate.edu:1957/33039
Provided by: ScholarsArchive@OSU

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