ResearchSPace - Bath Spa University

    The moon's trick (2016-2018) [REF2021 collection]

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    The Moon's Trick is an exhibition of two new commissions (a sound installation, Prayers 1-39, and performance, Looking Down From The Sky), and a series of 6 embroidery works that explore the dialogue between embroidery, sound and musical performance. Drawing on an archive of post war Korean photographs, Young In Hong looks at the unexplored time and space of history by translating it in multiple ways. This Collection comprises a multi-component output with contextualising information, providing evidence of the sound installation, performance, and exhibition of embroidery works. Contextualising information includes a 300 word statement, research timeline, and research questions, as well as documentation of research processes

    Men's experience of a guided self-help intervention for hot flushes associated with prostate cancer treatment

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    Up to 80% of men who receive androgen deprivation therapy report hot flushes and for many these are associated with reduced quality of life. However it is recognised that there are a number of barriers to men’s engagement with support to manage symptoms and improve quality of life. This qualitative study was embedded within a larger randomised controlled trial (MANCAN) of a guided self-help cognitive behavioural intervention to manage hot flushes resulting among men receiving androgen deprivation therapy. The study aimed to explore the engagement and experiences with the guided self-help intervention. Twenty men recruited from the treatment arm of the MANCAN trial participated in a semi-structured interview exploring acceptability of the intervention, factors affecting engagement and perceived usefulness of the intervention. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a Framework approach. Over two thirds of respondents (69%) reported reading the intervention booklet in full and over 90% reporting practising the relaxation CD at least once a week. Analysis of the interviews identified three super-ordinate themes and these related to changes in hot flush symptomatology (learned to cope with hot flushes in new ways), the skills that participants had derived from the intervention (promoting relaxation and reducing stressors), and to a broader usefulness of the intervention (broader impact of the intervention and skills). The present study identified positive engagement with a guided self-help intervention and that men applied the skills developed through the intervention to help them undertake general lifestyle changes. Psycho-educational interventions (e.g. cognitive behaviour therapy, relaxation, and positive lifestyle elements) offer the potential to be both effective and well received by male cancer survivors

    Towards a framework for creativity in popular music degrees

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    [opening paragraph] Let us begin with semantics. The only reason we might use the term ‘popular music degree’ is to differentiate its content from that of a ‘music degree’ – not ‘classical music degree’, but ‘music degree’. That is to say, the default semantic in higher music education is to assume that ‘music’ means ‘classical music’, despite the fact that the Western Art- music/classical canon represents a only a tiny proportion of the music that global society consumes today, and an even smaller proportion of what has been produced historically. Specialized music education in the developed world is dominated by the Western classical music tradition, and in higher education this is historically characterized by the ‘conservatoire’1. In the seventeenth century the primary function of the earliest French and Italian music schools developed out of the church’s need for composers to write music, and singers to perform it. As the demand for secular instrumental music expanded, what we might call the ‘Naples model’ of selective conservatoires spread across Europe2; their primary raison d’etre was to train instrumental and vocal performers to achieve sufficient expertise to play the music of the day (Nettl, 1995; Papageorgi et al., 2010; Parkinson, 2013; Stakelum, 2013). [continued]..

    Radon as a carcinogenic built-environmental pollutant

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    Radon (222Rn) has been highlighted by a number of authors as a significant public health concern. For example, it is the second most significant cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking (c. 1000–2000 and 21 000 deaths per year in the UK and USA, respectively), yet a very high proportion of the general public appears to be unaware of the risk. This chapter deals with topical radon issues, such as: radon in the workplace; radon in homes; exposure to radon during leisure activities; radon and water; measurement and monitoring; seasonal correction; remediation; cancer risks; cost–benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness; mapping; future policies; and further research. This assessment of the state of radon research is focused on the UK as an example of a country where radon has been on the governmental agenda since the late 1970s, but also highlights radon issues throughout the world in, for example, the USA, Europe and Asia

    Gendering the field: Pauline Boty and the predicament of the woman artist in the British pop art movement

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    This thesis explores the predicament of the woman Pop artist, focussing on British Pop Art and taking as its case study Pauline Boty (1938-66). It considers why so few women artists were involved with the movement, the nature of the contribution they might make and the reasons for their subsequent marginalisation and exclusion from the histories. It then pursues the art historical and theoretical implications of the resulting findings. To achieve these ends a considerable body of completely new empirical evidence is presented. A detailed statistical and discursive analysis of contemporary records (for example convocation lists and other documents from the Royal College of Art and Young Contemporaries exhibition catalogues) exposes the deep gender bias of the institutional and discursive field in which British Pop operated. The very difficult predicament of the woman artist (statistically more extreme than had been anticipated) is revealed: difficulties to which mainstream histories of Pop have remained oblivious. Pauline Boty's life and work , on which nothing had been published, are interrogated through a very wide range of primary evidence : numerous interviews with friends, colleagues, lovers, family members and others, private letters and photographs, media material and other documentation. With the help of an Arts Council grant her oeuvre, much of which had been dispersed and/or lost, was re-assembled, archived and exhibited and is, collectively, available for the first time in these pages. Through this evidence the experience and expression of a female subjectivity within the genre of Pop is brought to light. Boty's discursive absence over the last thirty years and recent re-appearance as an object of discourse are then observed and analysed. Relatively recent discursive shifts have made it possible to 'see' the work of the woman Pop artist in a way that had previously been difficult if not impossible. The cumulative findings of this thesis, informed by postmodern and feminist theory, led to a questioning of feminist and mainstream narratives. The thesis arrives at proposals for a revisionist view of both the Pop Art Movement and of feminist practice

    "The grocers honour": or, taking the City seriously in 'The knight of the burning pestle'

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    The Knight of the Burning Pestle famously flopped when first performed c. 1607. Critical debate over its so-called ‘privy mark of irony’ has subsequently oscillated between those who argue that the play did not satirize the London citizenry trenchantly enough, and those who prefer the interpretation that the ‘irony’ was only too apparent, and that this alienated the audience. Few have fully interrogated the play’s complex engagement with the early Jacobean citizen class and the City of London’s livery companies. This paper argues that The Knight’s presentation of citizens takes place in the context both of a theatre much more involved in civic structures, and of a city more imbued with performance, than is usually presumed

    The Habits of Artists (2014-2019) [REF2021 collection]

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    By understanding the patterns and routines in artists’ behaviours as unique features of creative knowledge making, The Habits of Artists seeks to deepen our insight into art learning. Employing a unique platform through which the audience is engaged in public learning as performance, the research asks whether we can find fitting frameworks for communicating the complexities of art practice, in which often subjective and bespoke logics drive creativity. This multi-component output is comprised of a series of performance events and texts jointly conceived and co-authored by Jo Addison and Natasha Kidd. Taking place between 2014 and 2020, five iterative participatory performances were commissioned by Tate, Freelands Foundation, and Blip Blip Blip, beginning with Noticer and followed by the four-part series Inventory of Behaviours. These participatory performance events were designed to collect and analyse the rituals, traits, and habits of artists that surround the production of their work in the physical, digital, and psychological realm of the studio. A sequence of iterative events, each performance was contingent upon the findings of the last. Two chapters expand on the research questions and methods of the performances. Through the project’s multiple components, Addison and Kidd explore and communicate through participation and dialogue how artists’ peripheral activities, behaviours and habits have been systematically ignored by scholarship, but also their pedagogical value. Addison and Kidd have disseminated the project’s findings through conference papers, talks and seminars at the Royal Geographical Society, London and the National Association for Fine Art Education (NAFAE), amongst others. This Collection contains documentation of the performance events, as well as contextualising information including two co-authored publications, a film about research as practice, talks and presentations, and information about the research context and findings. It also contains a 300-word Statement about the Research Project, a Research Timeline and a set of Research Questions. This multi-component output is comprised of a series of performance events and texts jointly conceived and co-authored by Jo Addison and Natasha Kidd. Taking place between 2014 and 2020, six iterative participatory performances were commissioned by Tate, Freelands Foundation, and blip blip blip, beginning with Noticer and followed by the five-part series Inventory of Behaviours. These participatory performance events were designed to collect and analyse the rituals, traits, and habits of artists that surround the production of their work in the physical, digital, and psychological realm of the studio. A sequence of iterative events, each performance was contingent upon the findings of the last. Two chapters expand on the research questions and findings of the performances

    Ethics of perception, ethics of communication

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    The studio assistant: artist-assistant relationships and the lineage of contemporary British sculpture (1960 - present day)

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    Poster presented at a conference offering an opportunity for academic staff, technical staff, and research students in Art & Design to meet and consider the challenges posed by the changing notion of ‘the studio’ as the space for learning and teaching. The event considered the questions that these changes pose to our community of practice model and the value that we place upon learning through making
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