CCU Digital Commons

    Student Affairs and Retention Committee, August 6, 2015

    Get PDF

    Audit Committee, February 13, 2014

    Get PDF

    Co-Crystallization and Polymorphism of Naturally Occurring Peptide Derivatives

    Get PDF
    Carnosine is a dipeptide compound that is found in many dietary supplements and food products. Carnosine has many functions in the body, such as alleviating oxidative stress on tissues by acting as an antioxidant compound. Carnosine, therefore, has important anti-aging properties. Carnosine is also capable of forming protective sequestration structures around heavy metal ions; this process of chelating metals ions in solutions is very beneficial for maintaining the well-being of cells in the body. Thus, carnosine could be useful in pharmaceutical products for creating anti-aging drugs that would reduce tissue stress and promote a healthy cellular environment. I attempted to co-crystallize carnosine with four polycarboxylated aromatic acids and two Krebs cycle metabolites to generate various supramolecular structures based on the placement of carboxyl groups on the co-crystallants. If a co-crystallization method is created for carnosine, pharmaceutical products can utilize the same method in producing carnosine-based drugs. Furthermore, carnosine chelation of various metal ions was conducted to determine if carnosine would chelate in a variety of solution environments. Co-crystallization of carnosine with the four polycarboxylated aromatic acids and two Krebs cycle metabolites was not fully achieved, possibly due to environmental and stability conditions of solutions. Carnosine demonstrated metal-ion chelation properties with copper ions, whereas iron and zinc and iron ion solutions did not reveal carnosine chelation properties. In conclusion, more experiments with carnosine should be conducted to find optimal co-crystallization conditions for the production of pharmaceutical products

    Finance, Planning and Facilities Committee, August 11, 2016

    Get PDF

    Hardbottom Characterization and Relationship to the Geologic Framework in Long Bay, South Carolina

    Get PDF
    Hardbottom seafloor is a common element among sediment-starved portions of the inner continental shelf along the U.S. Atlantic margin. These areas are characterized by indurated sediment surfaces that are heavily altered by biological and physical processes. Long Bay, in northeastern South Carolina, offers ideal environmental conditions for hardbottom exposure with only patchy Holocene sand deposits, interspersed with extensive hardbottom areas. Here we use high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, CHIRP subbottom profiling and electrical resistivity data, along with surficial sediment samples, hardbottom thin sections, and water column radioisotope (radon-222) analysis to investigate the origin and geologic framework of a region of hardbottom seafloor in central Long Bay. Based on petrographic analyses, Long Bay seafloor hardbottom is characterized as phosphatic glauconite sandstone, while loose beach hardbottom samples are characterized as quartz sandstone or fossiliferous limestone. The presence of glauconite and older foraminiferal species comprising the seafloor hardbottom samples suggest that the hardbottom within the study area likely formed during the Cretaceous and Tertiary. Correlation of bathymetry and CHIRP data suggests that the hardbottom is outcropping, truncated and tilted sedimentary rock strata that outcrops at the seafloor as a result of the location of the Mid-Carolina Platform High. As such, it appears that the underlying geologic framework does provide spatial control on the distribution of hardbottom, where hardbottom is often associated with ancient outcropping sedimentary strata. Mineralogical differences between seafloor hardbottom and loose beach hardbottom samples suggest that there may be other types of hardbottom within Long Bay that were not sampled. Lastly, electrical resistivity and radon-222 data show that there are indicators of groundwater discharge associated with regions of hardbottom, though no potential pathway could be identified at this time

    Tempo Magazine, Spring 2010

    Get PDF
    Tempo Magazine is Coastal Carolina University\u27s student-produced feature magazine. TEMPO #23. Editor: Amanda Kraft. Faculty advisor: Melissa Paschuck.https://digitalcommons.coastal.edu/tempo-magazine/1022/thumbnail.jp

    Professionals in Bureaucracies: Causes and Consequences

    Get PDF
    CCU Digital Commonsis based in US
    Repository Dashboard
    Do you manage CCU Digital Commons? Access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Repository Dashboard!