Bard College

    Rhythm Quest: Creating a Music Video Game

    Get PDF
    This project was the creation of a music-centric video game named Rhythm Quest. Rhythm Quest is a combination of two very distinct video game genres, in a way that has not yet been done in the mainstream, particularly taking inspiration from the rhythm game Rhythm Heaven and the turn-based roleplaying-game (RPG) Paper Mario. It was a joint project between the computer science and music divisions, and involved the creation of all assets necessary to create a video game, including sprite creation, software development, writing, music, and sound effects. The game’s tutorial, as well as the battle system, is complete

    LOT

    No full text
    My obsession with animation was born from the combination of many interests. The medium allows me to create sculpture, compose a two dimensional image, explore a narrative over time, create a beginning and an end, be in control and most importantly create a relatable but neutral reality that implies a common experience for the viewer. After having dabbled in many media over the years, I came to realize that film is most appealing to me, as it is the most direct art form. Modern audiences are very receptive to it due to our constant exposure to television and film. Film is so close to life because of the implication of motion and time, which makes it particularly easy to relate to. Being able to manipulate time allows me to communicate more directly with my audience while still creating a nearly infinite space with plenty of room for interpretation. I grew up in Germany, where analog stop-motion animation is still a prominent aspect of public television. The sterile and dark character of this film is a product of my familiarity with the germanic aesthetic. The problem I have with many stop-motion animation films is their lack of cinematography. Therefore when making LOT I paid special attention to the compositions of the frames and the lighting of the scenes. The production started about a year ago, and was shot completely chronologically. One scene led to the other; there was no story-board drawn or even imagined beforehand. I knew I wanted to create a film that portrays the binary of heavy and light, and comment on the importance of finding balance. The idea behind this process was to never plan ahead, interpreting one moment and letting it create the next. It was a meditation, not only in the process of creating the narrative, but also making each individual scene. It forced me into repetition, which is my preferred way of working. Making a stop-motion animation requires you to reinvent time, as what you see is not what was shot. Throughout the making of LOT I became very aware of how common movements are constructed, as I had to imagine them in parts and pretend to live in a slow-motion reality. The process of making this film was a challenge that I wanted to face. I struggle with planning ahead, and therefore find long-term projects to be difficult, but stretching time and dealing with it abstractly made me overcome my impatience when it comes to making art. I chose to have a semi-improvised live-performance by Zombi Jazz to go along with the film because I want the audience to hear an immediate musical interpretation of the visuals by multiple people. I hoped it would evoke a sense of Ouiji-Board-unity

    Senior Thesis Proposal

    No full text
    Senior Thesis Proposa

    Senior Thesis Proposal

    No full text
    Senior Thesis Proposa

    Enumerating Faces of Zonohedra

    No full text

    Accumulations

    No full text
    ACCUMULATIONS What makes an intentional or meaningful mark different from an accidental or “meaningless” one? How do marks made by an artist in or on a space differ from the marks made in creation of that space or in the process of past activities there? What can be surmised from past marks found and presented? An architectural space intrinsically has some marks within its structure. Space can’t exist without marks, whether they be the gestural shape of a building, the scrape marks of spackled over holes, or the texture of sheetrock or brick. The “white box” of the gallery is supposed to be a blank slate, a space that disappears except for elements that the artist brings to light. In the gallery there is blankness, but not objectively so. Even on their own the white walls of the gallery have character, stories hidden within them that can be glimpsed in the bumps and scratches on them, some from previous purposeful, realized uses, some from accidents, some by nature of the texture of the materials that the space is made of. UBS is a space with much history. Many things have been created and destroyed here, leaving behind hints of their existence in the patches and bumps on the space. The “blank” walls may be highlighted or ignored based on what an artist chooses to put in the space. Within the space of UBS, I have some things to discover, things to build on. I am collaborating with the building and materials and textures that make it and with marks that others have left there, marks that the white walls have absorbed. In these pieces I attempted to create marks and areas with no form other than what they acquired via the process of being made (for example, marks of my fingertips) and from the surface they are made on (the wall and floor). They are the remnants of my explorations of the walls and the spaces of UBS. Sections on the floor and the trails of graphite beneath the installations show what accumulated as a byproduct of my process of making + the materials + the space. I have used only materials that I can manipulate with my hands to create delicate works that are inseparable from the space that contains them. They exist in this space and would not exist as the same pieces outside of it. Without the wall the materials take up virtually no space. Condensed, they are only dust. When taken down they mingle with the dust on the floor, suddenly much smaller scale. Their grip on the wall is secure yet delicate, highly textural but able to be brushed away with the slightest touch. Though both graphite and plaster leave behind stray black and white marks on everything they touch, at the end of the show these pieces will be swept away and painted over, leaving no mark of their own on the wall. - Ivia Sky Yavelow

    An Investigation of the Molecular Mechanism of Quorum Sensing in J. lividum

    No full text
    Janthinobacterium lividum (J. lividum) is a rod shaped, Gram-­‐negative, motile, aquatic bacterium known to secrete violacein, a dark purple pigment with antibacterial, antitumor, antiparasitic, and antifungal characteristics (Durán and Menck 2001; Wille and Steglich 2001; Pantanella et al. 2006). Additionally, Harris et al. determined that violacein reduces and may potentially eliminate Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infection (Harris et al. 2009). Bd is an invasive chytrid known to cause chytridiomycosis; a disease that has affected over 200 species of amphibians, one third of which are now nearing extinction (Brucker et al. 2008; Harris et al. 2009). The genes that regulate the production of violacein in J. lividum are unknown, yet pigment production is predicted to be under the control of the suite of genes responsible for quorum sensing (Pantanella et al. 2006). Quorum sensing (QS) is density dependent gene expression in response to bacterial communication characterized by the exchange of small signaling molecules known as autoinducers. In this study, a random mini-­‐Tn5 transposon library of BJB1, an environmental isolate of J. lividum, was generated and screened for unique pigment phenotypes as a representation of QS phenotypes. This study identified six genes potentially involved in quorum sensing in BJB1. By elucidating the specific genes involved in QS, it may be possible to modify gene expression in J. lividum to enhance its pigment production, making it a more attractive therapeutic agent against Bd and other pathogens

    A 21st-Century Office Building

    No full text
    In accordance with ABET requirements for depth and breadth in an engineering curriculum, the civil engineering senior design project at Columbia University was to design a three-story office building. This capstone design was an exercise in demonstrating four aspects of what we have learned as graduating civil engineering students: Structural, Geotechnical, Environmental, and Construction Management. The three-story office building will be constructed in a flat, suburban location in Asylum Township, Pennsylvania. The plan dimensions are 60\u27×90\u27 and the height of the building above ground is 28\u27. The building, made of structural steel, is framed by a steel braced frame. The concrete floor and roof slabs were designed compositely with supporting beams and for one-way behavior. The foundation is composed of individual column spread footings. Considerations were made for ease of construction, so each floor was designed to have as much uniformity in size as possible. My group and I referenced ASCE/SEI 7-10, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, in order to find the general design requirements regarding building risk category, roof live load, wind speed and load, soil classification, and seismic design category and load. The soil classification was also determined from a subsurface boring log, provided by our professor. We performed structural analysis with SAP2000. We also designed our building to accommodate a green roof, atrium, and glass curtain wall. We considered LEED ratings and credits. We optimized regional credits, which are identified by US Green Building Council regional councils and chapters as having additional importance for the project’s region. In the 18848 zip code, which is where this building lies, water efficient landscaping, innovative wastewater technologies, and water use reduction are given specific emphasis. We also considered the importance of windows for natural light and views and various HVAC and materials options. We created a Gantt Chart, Critical Path Method diagram, and a Work Breakdown Schedule. Based on our Gantt Chart analysis, the project should take 243 days. With our construction management tools, we were able to provide a cost estimate and a bill of materials. We hope to carry the principles of socially responsible, sustainable, and innovative design into our careers and lives, and we found this project to be a meaningful culmination of our Civil Engineering education

    Conference Proceedings: American Property in a Hazardous Global Economy

    Get PDF
    Proceedings of the Conference held at the National Press Club, Washington, DC

    aprH2013

    Get PDF
    From April 2013 Robert Kelly Archive
    Bard College is based in US
    Do you manage Bard College? Access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Dashboard!