Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

    Ken Graham

    No full text
    Ken Graham is the Director of the NOAA National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. He received his Bachelor of Atmospheric Science Degree at the University of Arizona, and earned a Master of Science Degree in Geosciences from Mississippi State University. While in Mississippi, he was a broadcast meteorologist for a CBS affiliate and was an agricultural meteorologist for the Mississippi Network Radio. Ken began his career with NOAA in 1994 as an Intern Forecaster at the National Weather Service (NWS) in New Orleans. His career took him to agency’s Southern Region Headquarters in Fort Worth, Tex., as the Marine and Public Program Manager during National Weather Service Modernization in the early 1990s. He became the Meteorologist-in-Charge (MIC) at NWS forecast offices in Corpus Christi, Tex., and Birmingham, Ala., where the office was awarded the Department of Commerce medal each year (2001-2005) for innovative services, such as Instant Messaging with television stations during critical events such as the Veteran’s Day Tornado Outbreak. He has served as Systems Operations Chief at Southern Region Headquarters where he won a Bronze Medal for leading a team to make critical repairs in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. He moved to Washington D.C. to be Chief of Meteorological Services where he worked closely with partners to improve services and briefed Congressional Committees. He then served as the MIC at the NWS New Orleans/Baton Rouge office, during which time the office won the Department of Commerce Bronze medal for innovative services during Hurricane Gustav and Ike, the National Weather Association’s Operational Meteorology Award, and was included in the Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award for Decision Support Service that was presented to NOAA for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Ken received the National Weather Museum’s Weather Hero Award for 2010. Ken has extensive experience working directly with emergency managers during numerous high impact events, including nearly two decades along the U.S. coast. He has deployed to emergency operations centers, provided Impact Based Decision Support Briefings for emergency managers and elected officials, and delivered numerous training sessions and exercises related to tropical weather. Ken was elected a board member of the Louisiana Emergency Preparedness Association, is a member of the National Weather Association and the American Meteorological Society, and is a licensed HAM Radio Operator. He is also Chair of the World Meteorological Organization RA-IV.https://commons.erau.edu/catm-bios/1000/thumbnail.jp

    Episode 8 - A Student\u27s Perspective

    No full text

    Back Matter

    Get PDF

    Paper Session I-A - Technology Transfer in the Space Sector: Implementation and Issues

    Get PDF
    Technology transfer is the process of bringing technology from one sector to another in order to satisfy certain demands. Traditionally, technology is developed to address one specific problem. However, it can also be modified and reused for another problem. This paper examines the transferring process of technology: its implementation procedure, the benefit vs. costs, and the technological/managerial obstacles. Examples in the space sector were given in the analysis of technology transfer process

    Back Matter

    Get PDF

    Incorporating Green Design into Teaching Aircraft Preliminary Design

    Get PDF
    Incorporating green design principles into a senior capstone aircraft design course may be an effective way to accomplish a number of objectives desired for ABET accreditation including the coverage of contemporary issues, global awareness, and ethics. The overwhelming environmental issues in designing an aircraft appear to be operating emissions - either combustion by-products or noise - but material selection and disposal are not insubstantial and should be considered. This paper is an initial look into what tools and guidelines exist for designing green aircraft as well as the policy and regulatory issues that will help motivate a culture shift to more environmentally friendly air transport

    Back Matter

    Get PDF

    Back Matter

    Get PDF

    Airline Quality Rating 2002

    No full text
    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline quality on combined multiple performance criteria. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 2002, reflects monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 2001. AQR scores for the calendar year 2001 are based on 15 elements that focus on airline performance areas important to air travel consumers. The Airline Quality Rating 2002 is a summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the 11 largest U.S. airlines operating during 2001. Using the Airline Quality Rating system of weighted averages and monthly performance data in the areas of on-time arrivals, involuntary denied boardings, mishandled baggage, and a combination of 12 customer complaint categories, airlines comparative performance for the calendar year of 2001 is reported. This research monograph contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for domestic airline operations for the 12-month period of 2001, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 2000 are included for each airline to provide historical perspective regarding performance quality in the industry

    Airline Quality Rating 1995

    No full text
    The Airline Quality Rating (AQR) was developed and first announced in early 1991 as an objective method of comparing airline performance on combined multiple factors important to consumers. Development history and calculation details for the AQR rating system are detailed in The Airline Quality Rating (NIAR Report 91-11) issued in April, 1991, by the National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State University. This current report, Airline Quality Rating 1995, (NIAR Report 95-11), contains monthly Airline Quality Rating scores for 1994. Additional copies are available by contacting Wichita State University or the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The Airline Quality Rating 1995 (NIAR Report 95-11), contains a brief summary of month-by-month quality ratings for the nine major domestic U.S. airlines operating during 1994. Using the Airline Quality Rating system and monthly performance data for each airline for the calendar year of 1994, individual and comparative ratings are reported. This research monograph, NIAR Report 95-11, contains a brief summary of the AQR methodology, detailed data and charts that track comparative quality for major domestic airlines across the 12 month period of 1994, and industry average results. Also, comparative Airline Quality Rating data for 1991 through 1993 is included to provide a longer term view of quality in the industry
    Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is based in US
    Do you manage Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University? Access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Dashboard!