University of New England

    McArthur Gymnasium Entrance, Westbrook Junior College, Mid 20th Century

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    White steps and railings lead to the Westbrook Junior College, Portland, Maine, McArthur Gymnasium entrance in this mid 20th century black and white photograph. Carved into the brick facade over the entrance is McArthur Gymnasium and reflected onto the brick facade on either side of the entrance are the black shadows of Campus Green trees or shrubs.https://dune.une.edu/wchc_photos_mcarthur/1006/thumbnail.jp

    Mr. Chon Day Presenting a Cartoon to Joan Abar and Jack Fraizer

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    https://dune.une.edu/cranston_photos/1253/thumbnail.jp

    Six Students in Front of Window, Westbrook Junior College, 1957

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    Six Westbrook Junior College students pose in front of a large window and partially open venetian blind in this black and white candid photograph which is part of a back page collage in the 1957 Tower yearbook.Three of the young women perch on the window sill, one sits on a chair with a stuffed animal in her lap, and two scooch on the floor. They are casually dressed in slacks, shorts or skirts paired with blouses.https://dune.une.edu/wchc_photos_students1950s/1162/thumbnail.jp

    Puppet Show

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    Puppet shows in Old Havana are common events for children and parents. Note also the balloons of popular American characters, Hello Kitty and The Minions.https://dune.une.edu/sbyrd_cuba/1014/thumbnail.jp

    Christmas in Lisbon

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    A view of Christmas time in Lisbon, in the Rossio Square.https://dune.une.edu/sbyrd_portugal/1012/thumbnail.jp

    Attenuation Of Postoperative Adhesions Using A Modeled Manual Therapy (Data Files)

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    These files include data and figures utilized to research and communicate the following: Postoperative adhesions are pathological attachments that develop between abdominopelvic structures following surgery. Considered unavoidable and ubiquitous, postoperative adhesions lead to bowel obstructions, infertility, pain, and reoperations, and represent a substantial health care challenge. Despite over a century of research, no preventive treatment exists. Based on the hypothesis that postoperative adhesions develop from a lack of movement of the abdominopelvic organs, we proposed a relatively simple treatment approach using a modified manual therapy technique that mobilizes abdominopelvic structures in the immediate postoperative period while they are otherwise rendered immobile by surgery and opiates. In a modified rat cecal abrasion model, we found that this treatment reduced the development of the most problematic type of adhesion. This effect was associated with a delay in the appearance of trophic macrophages. In a separate experiment using a strictureplasty model we showed that the treatment did not inhibit healing or induce undesirable complications. We can conclude that the treatment, which we have called modeled manual therapy, has potential as an effective preventive for postoperative adhesions. Our results support the hypothesis that maintained movements of the damaged structures can attenuate postoperative adhesion development, and lay the groundwork for further research, including mechanical and pharmacologic approaches

    Cleveland D.O.

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    Portrait photograph taken of Dr. Cleveland, staff member at the Osteopathic Hospital of Maine located in Portland, Maine.https://dune.une.edu/moa_photos/1008/thumbnail.jp

    To Care is to Treat

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    To Care is to Treat is a reflection of a few experiences from my second and third year that have inspired me to become a palliative care physician

    The Recovery Of Matthew, A Success Story

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    In the fall of 1994, 11-year-old Matthew experienced a traumatic brain injury. Two years later, he is a consistent honor roll student. This is the story of how occupational therapy helped Matt heal and move on to life as a regular kid

    Grassland Songbirds In A Dynamic Management Landscape: Behavioral Responses And Management Strategies

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    In recent decades, earlier and more frequent harvests of agricultural grasslands have been implicated as a major cause of population declines in grassland songbirds. From 2002 to 2005, in the Champlain Valley of Vermont and New York, USA, we studied the reproductive success of Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) and Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) on four grassland treatments: (1) early-hayed fields cut before 11 June and again in early- to mid-July; (2) middle-hayed fields cut once between 21 June and 10 July; (3) late-hayed fields cut after 1 August; and (4) rotationally grazed pastures. Both the number of fledglings per female per year and nest success (logistic-exposure method) varied among treatments and between species. Although birds initiated nests earlier on early-hayed fields compared to others, haying caused 99% of active Savannah Sparrow and 100% of active Bobolink nests to fail. Both the initial cutting date and time between cuttings influenced renesting behavior. After haying, Savannah Sparrows generally remained on early-hayed fields and immediately renested (clutch completion 15.6 ± 1.28 days post-haying; all values are reported as mean 6 SE), while Bobolinks abandoned the fields for at least two weeks (mean clutch completion 33 ± 0.82 days post-haying). While female Savannah Sparrows fledged more offspring per year (1.28 ± 0.16) than female Bobolinks (0.05 6 0.05), reproductive success on early-hayed fields was low. The number of fledglings per female per year was greater on middle-hayed fields (Savannah Sparrows, 3.47 ± 0.42; Bobolinks, 2.22 ± 0.26), and late-hayed fields (Savannah Sparrows, 3.29 ± 0.30; Bobolinks, 2.79 ± 0.18). Reproductive success was moderate on rotationally grazed pastures, where female Savannah Sparrows and female Bobolinks produced 2.32 ± 0.25 and 1.79 ± 0.33 fledgling per year, respectively. We simultaneously conducted cutting surveys throughout the Champlain Valley and found that 3–8% of hayfield habitat was cut by 1–4 June, 25–40% by 12–16 June, and 32–60% by 28 June–2 July. Thus, the majority of grassland habitat was cut during the breeding season; however, late-hayed fields served as high-quality reserves for late-nesting female Bobolinks that were displaced from previously hayed fields. For fields first cut in May, a 65-day interval between cuts could provide enough time for both species to successfully fledge young
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