Dominican University of California

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    OT Consultation to Support Participation and Inclusion at a Science Museum

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    This poster is a culmination of a capstone project that centered around providing OT consultation to support participation and inclusion at the California Academy of Sciences. Specifically, we partnered with two departments- the Planetarium department and Volunteer Services Department.https://scholar.dominican.edu/occupational-therapy-student-research-posters/1007/thumbnail.jp

    The Barriers to Adult Play in Graduate Students

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    The purpose of this study is to expand the knowledge of barriers to play for graduate students. The research question asked, what are the barriers to play experienced by graduate students? Play is a complex term that is unique to the individual. Although subjective, existing literature gives suggestions as to what play can mean or feel like to the individual participating. Brown (2009), notes that the definition of play should be experienced rather than defined as it is distinctive to each individual. Van Vleet and Feeney (2015) describe play as being the purpose of amusement, fun or to have energetic, spontaneous and highly interactive qualities. The methodology used to answer the research question was a qualitative descriptive approach. This methodology generated a focused summary and understanding of the experiences that shaped participants\u27 views (Stanley & Nayer, 2014). This study was open to any full time graduate students of all genders, ages, and ethnicities. The researchers recruited 9 participants from Dominican University of California Occupational Therapy Program. The sampling method we used was purposive sampling as participants were chosen to have characteristics that met our inclusion criteria. Data was collected through an initial survey, focus groups, self-reported play reflection, and one on one semi-structured interviews. Two major themes were found, the first being Experienced Play with sub themes of play is a spectrum, play context, spontaneity, and feeling of play. The second major theme is Barriers to Play with the sub themes of money, time, responsibilities, energy/mental capacity, societal norms/expectations. This research contributes to the growing body of knowledge on adult play, addresses a gap in literature from the research surrounding play for graduate students, and emphasizes the significance of play in the context of higher education and the broader spectrum of adult life.https://scholar.dominican.edu/occupational-therapy-student-research-posters/1006/thumbnail.jp

    Garden-Based Nutrition Education May Lead to Increased Dietary Knowledge in Low Income Hispanic School Children

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    Background: Childhood obesity is a pressing public health concern in the United States, with rates continuing to increase in recent years. This problem disproportionately affects Latino children as well as those from low socioeconomic status. It is well established that nutrition knowledge deficiencies and resulting poor dietary habits are some of the most common contributing factors to childhood obesity. Garden-based nutrition education programs have been introduced to remedy this knowledge deficit; however, a gap remains regarding whether this model can be viable for low-income, culturally diverse populations. Aim: This literature review investigates the importance of diet in reducing childhood obesity while exploring the effects of gardening-based nutrition education on dietary choice improvements. This literature review presents gardening-based nutrition education models as an effective and sustainable method of obesity reduction by establishing a connection between improved dietary knowledge and dietary choices, thus leading to a lower incidence of obesity. Method: A quasi-experimental design with a convenience sample of 200 subjects split into an interventional and a control group. The interventional group will receive an 11-week-long nutrition education program to accompany the children\u27s regular school hours. Participants will be between the ages of 7 and 10, consistent with the ages of third to fifth grade elementary school children. Both groups will take a pre- and post-test using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) Survey, where results will be further plotted along a radar plot to examine each scoring component of the HEI. Result: The expectation is that the interventional group will see improvements to the HEI scores in each category compared to the control group, except for a decrease in the added sugars category

    Addressing the Occupational Needs of College Students

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    The Dominican Occupational Therapy (OT) Coaching project was led by a team of five master\u27s level OT students in collaboration with the Integrative Coaching (IC) team at Dominican University of California. Aligned with the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework 4th edition (2020), the project supported various aspects of student wellness, such as academics, healthy lifestyles, stress management, sleep hygiene, and time management. In the fall of 2022, the team conducted a comprehensive literature review and needs assessment of Dominican\u27s Student Success Center (SSC), actively engaged in SSC and IC meetings, and delivered an educational presentation on OT to SSC staff. The OT Coaching program officially launched in spring 2023, including implementation of a live scheduling website, OT Coaching intake forms, and an IC to OT student referral system. Building on groundwork from the previous capstone group, this team continued to explore the occupational needs of college students at Dominican. Leveraging the expertise of graduate-level OT students, OT Coaching offered personalized support services to improve students’ overall well-being and participation in meaningful occupations. Acknowledging the importance of client feedback and partnership, Google Forms were incorporated to gather input on program services at the end of each semester. This approach allowed further refinement and tailoring of support services based on the evolving needs of the student community. This team also emphasized sustainability by actively facilitating the transfer of this program to the next capstone group. This collaborative initiative significantly contributed to fostering a supportive campus environment and promoting enduring student success.https://scholar.dominican.edu/occupational-therapy-student-research-posters/1012/thumbnail.jp

    Unveiling New Realities: An In-Depth Analysis of Virtual Reality\u27s Impact on Postoperative Adolescents

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    The traditional approach to postoperative pain management heavily relies on opioids, but there’s been a surge in their misuse and adverse effects, leading to a significant public health concern. This has led healthcare providers to incorporate a multimodal approach aimed at reducing opioid dependence. This proposal introduces an immersive component, virtual reality (VR), not as a replacement for opioids but as a complementary tool offering distinct advantages for enhancing postoperative pain management. By immersing patients in a virtual environment, VR effectively distracts them from pain and discomfort, allowing for reduced opioid dosages and mitigating the risk of opioid misuse. Additionally, virtual reality provides a non-invasive and drug-free alternative, making it a safer and more patient-centered option for improving the overall postoperative experience. Through a comprehensive literature review, research findings were analyzed to highlight the necessity and effectiveness of VR in the postoperative period and among pediatric patients. Given that adolescents constitute a unique and potentially more responsive demographic, particularly in the postoperative setting where limited studies exist, this proposal advocates for a quasi-experimental study design to investigate the significant reductions in pain intensity and opioid usage achievable through immersive virtual reality among postoperative adolescents

    Life after Brain Injury: Family Perspectives

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    Background: Acquired brain injuries (ABI) is an umbrella term for mild to severe injuries of the brain with different etiologies. For our study, we focused on family members that have experienced traumatic brain injuries (TBI) or a non-traumatic brain injury (NTBI) (Oyesanya, 2017). Current practice revolves around traditional medical and rehabilitation models that provide services and interventions for brain injury survivors (BIS), typically within the first year post-injury. However, brain injury can have lifelong occupational engagement impacts. There is limited research focused on the brain injury survivor’s (BIS) return to home, work, and community, and the impact on family life over time. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to understand the lived experiences of the family members of brain injury survivors (BIS). This research was informed by our collaboration with the brain injury community, specifically with the ABI Program at Coastline Community College (CCC) and Michelle Wild, founder of BEST Connections© (Brain Education, Strategies and Technology, 2022). Our research questions were: (1) What are the lived experiences of BIS family members after the conclusion of typical rehab supports once they return to their homes, jobs and communities? (2) How can the examination of these phenomena better inform occupation centered client and family care as well as interprofessional collaboration for service to this community? Methods: Qualitative methods using semi-structured interviews. Convenience sampling through Coastline Community College, ABI program. Thematic coding via the constant comparison method and interrater reliability were established to 100% agreement consensus coding across the full research team. Results: We analyzed transcripts from 5 BIS family members. Results indicated five themes that described the lived experiences of BIS family members: (1) Medical Model - Limitations in Current Practice, (2) Changes in BIS - Perspective of the Family Member, (3) Social Change - Changes in Occupations, Habits, and Routines, (4) Family Roles - Adaptations and Navigating New Roles, and the overarching theme of (5) Family New Normal. Implications for OT: Occupational Therapy as a profession is client and family centered and this research provided necessary and missing family-centered evidence. This research is a call to action in the OT community for community service supports beyond traditional rehabilitation models as life after brain injury can feel invisible with lifelong implications

    Fantasia on a Theme of Purpose: Using a Music-Guided Scribble Technique to Support Meaning-Making in Older Adult Retiree Musicians

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    Within the population of older adults, overall well-being corresponds with the ability to self-actualize and seek meaning, but age-related changes combined with ageism and isolation can negatively impact this capacity to maintain a sense of purpose, especially following retirement. It may be that retired musicians are especially vulnerable to this experience later in life due to a loss of the primary method of creative engagement and community that is facilitated by musical performance in a group setting. Integrating phenomenological and ethnographic approaches, this study utilized a qualitative design to understand how music-guided art-making incorporating the scribble technique could support a sense of purpose among older adult retiree musicians. In an art-based intervention that collected art and interview data, participants responded to self-selected music with a variety of fluid and resistive drawing materials categorized as Media Dimension Variables (MDV). Data analysis was executed in conjunction with theories of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and the Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC). Results obtained via thematic analysis suggested that the intervention facilitated access to creative intentionality in support of a sense of purpose. The process of self-selecting music that was rich with personal significance provided an optimal frame of reference in a novel art experiential that engaged individual strengths, values, and expertise. Responding to music in real-time with a kinesthetically-focused drawing technique presented a non-threatening approach to visual composition; the spontaneity in this process also offered opportunities for self-discovery and contact with the present moment

    Participating in Formal Occupational Therapy Mentorship Programs: Mentees’ Experiences

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    Background. Formal mentorship is a well researched phenomenon, commonly used in healthcare professions, that offer a range of benefits for both mentors and mentees. Those who engage in formal mentoring programs often find that their evidence-based practice skills and quality of patient care improves. Within early-career stages of the occupational therapy profession, mentoring programs promote professional development and allow for a supported clinical experience. There is limited research on how engaging in formal mentoring programs impacts early-career occupational therapists (OTs) and their transition to practice. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to understand early-career OTs\u27 unique lived experiences in formal mentoring programs and how their experience influenced their transition to practice. Methods. In this phenomenological study, mentees were interviewed about their experiences in formal mentorship programs. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis as described by Braun and Clarke (Braun & Clarke, 2018). Results. Four themes emerged from the data analysis: Expectations and Critiques, Pivotal for Early-Career Transition, Practice Expertise, and Emotional Support and Confidence Building. Mentees reported benefits from participating in format mentorship programs which included the development of personal and professional skills, confidence building, and emotional support. Mentees also reported a desire for more structure and consistency within their programs. Conclusion. This study supports current evidence regarding the benefits of formal mentorship programs and the effects on early-career OTs’ transition to practicehttps://scholar.dominican.edu/occupational-therapy-student-research-posters/1010/thumbnail.jp

    Participating in Formal Occupational Therapy Mentorship Programs: Mentees Experiences

    No full text
    Background. Formal mentorship is a well researched phenomenon, commonly used in healthcare professions, that offer a range of benefits for both mentors and mentees. Those who engage in formal mentoring programs often find that their evidence-based practice skills and quality of patient care improves. Within early-career stages of the occupational therapy profession, mentoring programs promote professional development and allow for a supported clinical experience. There is limited research on how engaging in formal mentoring programs impacts early-career occupational therapists (OTs) and their transition to practice. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to understand early-career OTs\u27 unique lived experiences in formal mentoring programs and how their experience influenced their transition to practice. Methods. In this phenomenological study, mentees were interviewed about their experiences in formal mentorship programs. The interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis as described by Braun and Clarke (Braun & Clarke, 2018). Results. Four themes emerged from the data analysis: Expectations and Critiques, Pivotal for Early-Career Transition, Practice Expertise, and Emotional Support and Confidence Building. Mentees reported benefits from participating in format mentorship programs which included the development of personal and professional skills, confidence building, and emotional support. Mentees also reported a desire for more structure and consistency within their programs. Conclusion. This study supports current evidence regarding the benefits of formal mentorship programs and the effects on early-career OTs’ transition to practice

    Creating Sensory Friendly Spaces and Accessibility to Support Inclusion at the California Academy of Sciences

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    Many community cultural arts organizations, such as theaters and museums, are making intentional efforts to maximize accessibility for patrons and visitors with diverse abilities and needs. Occupational therapy (OT) consultants have collaborated with community organizations to promote greater levels of inclusion and participation within community spaces through modification of policies (Umeda et al., 2017), the physical environment (Clement et al., 2022; Ideishi et al., 2010), and staff training and implementation (Fletcher et al., 2018a; Silverman & Tyszka, 2017). The purpose of our project is to provide OT consultation to support the ongoing diversity and inclusion efforts at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Prior to our project, accessibility resources at the science museum included sensory kits, a sensory map, and other resources on their website. While these supports benefit people with diverse sensory needs and abilities, museum staff identified specific ways to advance their diversity efforts within the museum. Aligned with the Academy’s accessibility priorities, we collaborated on two projects. Project 1 aimed to support the Academy’s Hohfeld Hall space through the implementation of resources, including a storybook and visual guide for use during astronomy shows. Within Project 1, the visual guide was found to be a facilitator of engagement, however more training is needed to ensure that presenters are using it uniformly. Project 2 involved creating and facilitating a sensory processing training workshop for the docents, which include an overview of sensory processing, neurodiversity, and how to support participation and interaction with diverse museum visitors. Within Project 2, docents reported a better understanding of sensory processing, new sense of empathy for neurodivergent individuals, and strategies to implement at their stations to engage all museum visitors. Both initiatives were designed to enhance accessibility within the museum

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