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    Caption title.Also available via the World Wide Web as an Acrobat .pdf file (2.54, 119 p.).Includes bibliographical references

    Voluntary HIV counseling and testing: facts, issues, and answers

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    HIV/NAIEP/10-90/11

    International health data reference guide

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    NCHS.Title from caption.Vols. for 1983-1987 issued as DHHS publication.Vol. for 1985 published by the Office of International Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics; 1987 by the International Statistics Staff, Office of Planning and Extramural Programs, National Center for Health Statistics

    Preliminary estimates of the prevalence of selected underlying health conditions among patients with coronaVirus disease 2019 \u2014 United States, February 12\u2013March 28, 2020

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    What is already known about this topic? Published reports from China and Italy suggest that risk factors for severe COVID-19 disease include underlying health conditions, but data describing underlying health conditions among U.S. COVID-19 patients have not yet been reported.What is added by this report? Based on preliminary U.S. data, persons with underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease, and cardiovascular disease, appear to be at higher risk for severe COVID-19\u2013associated disease than persons without these conditions.What are the implications for public health practice? Strategies to protect all persons and especially those with underlying health conditions, including social distancing and handwashing, should be implemented by all communities and all persons to help slow the spread of COVID-19.On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared CoronaVirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) a pandemic (1). As of March 28, 2020, a total of 571,678 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 26,494 deaths have been reported Worldwide (2). Reports from China and Italy suggest that risk factors for severe disease include older age and the presence of at least one of several underlying health conditions (3,4). U.S. older adults, including those aged 6565 years and particularly those aged 6585 years, also appear to be at higher risk for severe COVID-19\u2013associated outcomes; however, data describing underlying health conditions among U.S. COVID-19 patients have not yet been reported (5). As of March 28, 2020, U.S. states and territories have reported 122,653 U.S. COVID-19 cases to CDC, including 7,162 (5.8%) for whom data on underlying health conditions and other known risk factors for severe outcomes from respiratory infections were reported. Among these 7,162 cases, 2,692 (37.6%) patients had one or more underlying health condition or risk factor, and 4,470 (62.4%) had none of these conditions reported. The percentage of COVID-19 patients with at least one underlying health condition or risk factor was higher among those requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission (358 of 457, 78%) and those requiring hospitalization without ICU admission (732 of 1,037, 71%) than that among those who were not hospitalized (1,388 of 5,143, 27%). The most commonly reported conditions were diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease, and cardiovascular disease. These preliminary findings suggest that in the United States, persons with underlying health conditions or other recognized risk factors for severe outcomes from respiratory infections appear to be at a higher risk for severe disease from COVID-19 than are persons without these conditions.Suggested citation for this article: Preliminary Estimates of the Prevalence of Selected Underlying Health Conditions Among Patients with CoronaVirus Disease 2019 \u2014 United States, February 12\u2013March 28, 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. ePub: 31 March 2020. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6913e2mm6913e2-H.pdfDiamond Princess -- Grand Princess -- Additional Ships -- Discussion -- Acknowledgments

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    An early adopter of public preschool (i.e., pre-kindergarten, "pre-k"), evidence from Baltimore City, Maryland, can provide insight for those working to improve access to early education opportunities. We followed a cohort of children entering kindergarten in Baltimore City Public Schools during the 2007-2008 year through the 2010-2011 academic year. Students were grouped by pre-k experience: public pre-k (n = 2828), Head Start (n = 839), Head Start plus public pre-k (n = 247), private pre-k (n = 993), or informal care (n = 975). After adjusting for individual- and school-level characteristics, students from the Head Start plus public pre-k group were the most likely to enter kindergarten with the foundational skills and behaviors needed to be successful (vs. all groups, P 64 .001). Students in informal care were the least likely to enter kindergarten with this skillset (vs. all pre-k groups P 64 .001). Children from informal care were also significantly more likely than all other groups to be chronically absent in kindergarten (P 64 .001). By third grade, children from informal care were least likely to be reading on grade level and most likely to have been retained a grade (vs. all pre-k groups P 64 .001). Children from disadvantaged populations who were not enrolled in pre-k faced significant difficulties keeping up with their peers throughout elementary school; interventions to improve their transition to school and increase their likelihood of academic success are warranted. Universal preschool is likely to improve education outcomes for children in urban areas.20202021-05-01T00:00:00ZT32 MH019545/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United StatesU01 CE001954/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States1U01CE001954-01A1/CC/CDC HHS/United StatesNIMH T32-MH019545-25S1/NH/NIH HHS/United States31883063PMC7166150967

    Weekly cases of notifiable diseases, United States, U.S. territories, and Non-U.S. Residents weeks ending May 16, 2020 (Week 20) Table1ll Vibriosis (any species of the family Vibrionaceae, other than toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 or O159)

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    2020-20-Table1ll -H.pdfVibriosis (any species of the family Vibrionaceae, other than toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 or O159)2020936

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in the U.S. : last updated on May 20, 2020 [Korean]

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in the U.S. : last updated on May 20, 2020 [Korean]This page is updated daily based on data confirmed at 4:00pm ET the day before.Numbers reported on Saturdays and Sundays are preliminary and not yet confirmed by state and territorial health departments. These numbers may be modified when numbers are updated on Mondays.2020769

    Weekly cases of notifiable diseases, United States, U.S. territories, and Non-U.S. Residents weeks ending May 16, 2020 (Week 20) Table1mm Viral hemorrhagic fevers

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    2020-20-Table1mm -H.pdfViral hemorrhagic fevers2020936

    Provisional death counts for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) : daily updates of totals by week and state : updated: May 20, 2020

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    Note: Provisional death counts are based on death certificate data received and coded by the National Center for Health Statistics as of May 20, 2020. Death counts are delayed and may differ from other published sources (see Technical Notes). Counts will be updated periodically. Additional information will be added to this site as available.The provisional counts for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) deaths are based on a current flow of mortality data in the National Vital Statistics System. National provisional counts include deaths occurring within the 50 states and the District of Columbia that have been received and coded as of the date specified. It is important to note that it can take several weeks for death records to be submitted to National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), processed, coded, and tabulated. Therefore, the data shown on this page may be incomplete, and will likely not include all deaths that occurred during a given time period, especially for the more recent time periods. Death counts for earlier weeks are continually revised and may increase or decrease as new and updated death certificate data are received from the states by NCHS. COVID-19 death counts shown here may differ from other published sources, as data currently are lagged by an average of 1\u20132 weeks.The provisional data presented on this page include the weekly provisional count of deaths in the United States due to COVID-19, deaths from all causes and percent of expected deaths (i.e., number of deaths received over number of deaths expected based on data from previous years), pneumonia deaths (excluding pneumonia deaths involving influenza), pneumonia deaths involving COVID-19, influenza deaths, and deaths involving pneumonia, influenza, or COVID-19; (a) by week ending date and (b) by specific jurisdictions.20201112

    Cruise ship crew member disembarkations

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    CDC is allowing crew members to disembark from cruise ships in U.S. waters and return home if cruise lines submit a signed attestation stating that they have complied with requirements to safely disembark their crew members.CDC shared information with all cruise lines in US waters on April 23, 2020, to help crew members return home safely. Since then, several cruise lines have requested to disembark crew through this process, and CDC stands ready to approve these requests with same-day turnaround. The list on this page provides the latest information on signed attestations that CDC has received from cruise lines and approved to safely disembark crew. This list is updated daily.Emergency Medical Disembarkations -- Frequently Asked Questions -- Cruise Ship Crew Member Disembarkations Approved by CDC (April 15, 2020 \u2013 Present).20201112

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