South Dakota State University

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    Targeted Browsing With Goats for Eastern Redcedar (\u3cem\u3eJuniperus virginiana\u3c/em\u3e L.) Control

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    Eastern redcedar (ERC) (Juniperus virginiana L.) encroachment into grassland ecosystems, facilitated by shelterbelt planting and fire suppression threatens the long-term health of the Great Plains grasslands. Goats browse (defoliate and debark) juniper tree trunks and branches. Since ERC do not resprout, trunk girdling may kill the tree, making targeted browsing with goats a potential ERC control tool. However, little field experimentation exists. The objective was to investigate how goats browse ERC of different heights and the impact on tree mortality. A randomized complete block design was used with five sites comprised of four replicate paddocks browsed two consecutive summers. Up to ten ERC in five height classes (\u3c 50, 51–100, 101–150, 151–200, and 201–250 cm) were tagged permanently in each paddock and browsing measurements and forage disappearance were recorded. Juniper height was positively re- lated with debarking (y = 0.12x; R2 = 0.29; where x = plant height in cm) and negatively related with de- foliation (y = –0.28x + 72.1; R2 = 0.39; where x = plant height in cm). Two sites consistently showed that taller trees had more foliage browning (P \u3c 0.001). Thus, since taller trees are more likely debarked, debarking may be related to tree death. On these sites, ERC trees 151–200 cm had more (P \u3c 0.05) browned foliage and higher (P = 0.01) mortality. Sites with more deciduous browse had less debarking and mortality. Therefore, ERC debarking and mortality success with targeted browsing with goats will most likely depend on site plant community composition characteristics where juniper trees should be the only woody component. Targeted browsing with goats could be an effective ERC site pretreatment when integrated with prescribed fire or other control methods

    SDSU Data Science Symposium, 2024

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    https://openprairie.sdstate.edu/ds_symposium_2024_gallery/1012/thumbnail.jp

    SDSU Data Science Symposium, 2024

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    SDSU Data Science Symposium, 2024

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    SDSU Data Science Symposium, 2024

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    SDSU Data Science Symposium, 2024

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    Biodegradable Packaging Films From Banana Peel Fiber

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    Plastics are the most popular choice for packaging materials due to their strength, flexibility, and affordability. Their non-biodegradability, however, is an environmental concern and a serious human health issue that necessitates the development of sustainable and biodegradable alternatives. Towards this end, lignocellulosic residue from biowaste stands out as a viable option due to its robust structure, biocompatibility, biodegradability, low density, and non-toxicity. Herein, the lignocellulosic fiber from banana peel was extracted by alkali and bleaching treatment, solubilized in 68% ZnCl2 solution, and crosslinked through a series of Ca2+ ion concentrations, and films prepared. Results suggest that increasing Ca2+ ions concentration significantly increases the film\u27s tensile strength but decreases moisture content, transparency, moisture absorption, water solubility, water vapor permeability, and percentage elongation. Films have a half-life of 15.26–20.72 days and biodegrade more than 50% of their weight within 3 weeks at a soil moisture of 21%. Overall, banana peel fiber could aid in designing and developing biodegradable films and offer a sustainable solution to limit the detrimental effects of plastics

    The Fraction of Biomass of C3 and C4 Plants in the C3 Plant Community and C4 Plant Community

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    Data description: C3_biomass_frac: the fraction of biomass of C3 plants C4_biomass_frac: the fraction of biomass of C4 plants File type: .csv File size: 0.182K

    Poster Session

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    Poster sessio

    Session 1: \u3cem\u3eCommercial Finance Account Management Scorecards - Risk & Propensity\u3c/em\u3e

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    his presentation will focus first on providing an overview of Channel and the Data & Analytics team that performed this case study. We will start by showcasing the development of our account management risk score called AMR. This probability of default score has a lot of internal use cases, but we’ll focus on how it is used in our renewals strategy to generate additional volume – while being considerate of the risk. Then we will showcase the development of our renewal propensity model which measures the likelihood a customer will take a subsequent loan with us. These two models are used together to prioritize and manage leads for our renewal sales team – making them more efficient while driving more sales

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