Rutgers University Community Repository

    Feasibility of Culturing and Stocking Hudson River Striped Bass: 1973 Annual Report

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    The major objectives of this study are to determine the feasibility of artificially rearing Hudson River striped bass and then stocking 20,000 of these in the Hudson River, and to develop an ongoing program of stocking and monitoring to determine survivability of artificially reared striped bass

    Improved treatment of anisotropic scattering for ultrafast radiative transfer analysis

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    The necessity of conserving both scattered energy and asymmetry factor for ballistic incidence after finite volume method (FVM) or discrete-ordinates method (DOM) discretization is shown. A phase-function normalization technique introduced previously by the present authors is applied to scattering of ballistic incidence in 3D FVM/DOM to improve treatment of anisotropic scattering through reduction of angular false scattering errors. Ultrafast radiative transfer predictions generated using FVM and DOM are compared to benchmark Monte Carlo to illustrate the necessity of ballistic phase-function normalization. Proper ballistic phase-function treatment greatly improves predicted heat fluxes and energy deposition for anisotropic scattering and for situations where accurate numerical modeling is crucial.Paper No: HT-14-1024, available in the ASME Digital Collection at http://heattransfer.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?articleID=2213448. Copyright 2015 by ASME.Peer reviewed

    DeJesus, Valerie. GGREAT Student Projects-license

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    Pilla, Jeffrey. GGREAT Student Projects-license

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    Casale, Vincent

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    Military Information: United States Naval Reserve.This project was assisted by a grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission, a division of the Department of State

    War Briefs of Rutgers Alumni. Classes of 1909-1910

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    This project was assisted by a grant from the New Jersey Historical Commission, a division of the Department of State

    Seminole Wall Hanging

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    Challenge projec

    Yeung, Ming Wai. GGREAT Student Projects-license

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    Department of Health and Senior Services Commissioner – Meeting With, March-April 2006

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    Documents related to the meeting between Commissioner Fred M. Jacobs, New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services and representative from the New Jersey Work Environment Council. It includes the letter to Commissioner Jacobs from Rick Engler requesting the meeting to discuss getting unnecessary hazardous chemicals out of public schools and the future of the Worker and Community Right to Know Act Program. There is also a list of attendees and talking points prepared for the meeting and another copy of the prepared talking points with Commissioner Jacob's responses

    “In real life, you have to speak up”: the civic significance of no-excuses classroom management practices

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    The neoliberal focus on the “achievement gap” as the sole measure of educational inequity has contributed to the proliferation of “no-excuses” schools and practices based on the belief that they raise test scores for low-income students of color. This study challenges that conception of equity, asking instead how no-excuses classroom management—highly regimented behavior management techniques increasingly common in schools serving urban youth—impact students’ development as citizens who might act to combat the structural inequalities that frame life in their communities. Drawing upon practice theories of identity, I use ethnographic methods to examine how the day-to-day ways teachers restrict, guide and respond to students’ behavior shape students’ civic development. My findings highlight three major themes: students’ perceptions of institutional authority, relationships to their communities, and sense of self-efficacy or “voice.” Students wanted teachers to use their authority to insist upon safe, respectful environments where learning could occur, and to address misbehavior in ways that were supportive rather than punitive. However, they often experienced school rules as arbitrary and overly restrictive, and rule enforcement as punitive and unfair. Despite their critiques of school rules, students commonly identified themselves and one another as “good kids” or “bad kids” based on whether they tended to get in trouble, and they mirrored school discourse that framed success as an individual endeavor requiring separation from others. Finally, students were immersed in an institutional environment that emphasized the value of compliance and often penalized outspokenness; consequently, though some students chose to “speak up” anyway, they were aware that doing so came with substantial risks. I suggest that these experiences tend to encourage students to view institutional authority as unresponsive and unfair, to be wary of association with others in their community, particularly those who are struggling, and to regulate and repress their own voices in order to comply with institutional expectations and achieve “success.” Furthermore, while similar patterns may be found at many schools serving low-income students of color, I argue that certain features of the no-excuses model make such outcomes particularly likely. Ultimately, these findings challenge the notion that no-excuses practices promote educational equity. They also highlight the need for teachers and scholars to attend to “classroom management” not simply as a means to the end of academic learning, but as a complex pedagogical task with social-emotional, racial and civic significance.Ph.D.Includes bibliographical referencesby Eliot James Graha
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