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    Data for: Assessing the impacts of drought on groundwater resources in Scotland using the Eden catchment in northeast Fife as a case study.

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    These data were collected as part of a Masters By Research project. The data comprises calculations done with Excel to validate findings in Chapter 4 of the thesis. This included tabulated data for evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge estimates and standard precipitation index values to determine drought frequency. It also includes unused data such as return periods that was not needed in the final thesis

    Game design as play:players as designers

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    This document discusses the design and development of the Game Design as Play: Players as Designers research project. Game Design as Play is a project investigating games that are actively designed by their players during play through both a series of workshops and the development of a tabletop game called making it up as we go along.making it up as we go along draws from the philosopher Peter Suber’s Nomic (Suber, 1990), Bernie De Koven’s concept of the Well-Played Game (De Koven,2013), and concepts from critical pedagogy (Freire, 2017) and participatory art (Bishop, 2012),, in an attempt to flatten the hierarchy between game designer and game player. Players take turns to add and remove rules from the game as they play, acting as both game designer and player, and by necessity engaging in a dialogue about game design and their shared interest in playing together.</div

    The self‐reference effect in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

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    The self‐memory system depends on the prioritization and capture of self‐relevant information, so may be disrupted by difficulties in attending to, encoding and retrieving self‐relevant information. The current study compares memory for self‐referenced and other‐referenced items in children with ADHD and typically developing comparison groups matched for verbal and chronological age. Children aged 5–14 (N = 90) were presented with everyday objects alongside an own‐face image (self‐reference trials) or an unknown child's image (other‐referenced trials). They were asked whether the child shown would like the object, before completing a surprise source memory test. In a second task, children performed, and watched another person perform, a series of actions before their memory for the actions was tested. A significant self‐reference effect (SRE) was found in the typically developing children (i.e. both verbal and chronological age‐matched comparison groups) for the first task, with significantly better memory for self‐referenced than other‐referenced objects. However, children with ADHD showed no SRE, suggesting a compromised ability to bind information with the cognitive self‐concept. In the second task, all groups showed superior memory for actions carried out by the self, suggesting a preserved enactment effect in ADHD. Implications and applications for the self‐memory system in ADHD are discussed

    Identity gripping or identity flight? Two distinct experiences correlated with self-reported depression in retired professional ice hockey players

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    This study presents qualitative data on the retirement experiences of retired professional ice hockey players and the relationship of these experiences to self-reported depressive symptoms and measures of athletic identity. Data were obtained from an online survey sent to retired professional hockey players within the Professional Hockey Players’ Association (PHPA) database. A total of 213 retired players completed the qualitative section of the survey and were included in the study. Former players expressed an array of responses to questions about the best and most difficult parts of their athletic retirement experiences, and what they believe would help future generations of retiring hockey players. Within these responses, there were two distinct patterns of identity-based challenges among depressed former players. One subset of depressed former players, captured by our proposed term athletic identity flight, scored lower in athletic identity, and emphasized positive aspects of retirement related to “building a new identity.” A second subset of depressed former players, who we described with the term athletic identity gripping, noted an identity crisis upon retiring and retained a strong athletic identity post-career. Non-depressed former players in our sample were more likely to emphasize the importance of career support to help future retiring hockey players, whereas depressed former players emphasized the importance of mental health support. Our findings may inform future preventative interventions to assist retiring hockey players in their end-of-athletic-career transition and suggest the value of tailoring interventions based on the strength of athletic identity and the presence of depressive symptoms

    Improved physical health in middle-older aged golf caddies following 24-weeks of high-volume physical activity

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    Background: The physical demands of golf caddying, including walking while carrying a golf bag, may potentially affect body composition, and markers of metabolic, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal health. Therefore, this study examined the impact of 24 weeks of caddying on physical health in middle-older aged males. Methods: Eleven full-time experienced male caddies (age: 59 [8] y; caddying experience: 14 [12] y) were recruited from a local golf course. The following were assessed at preseason and after 24 weeks of caddying (March–September 2022): body composition, heart rate, blood pressure, blood lipids, and performance tests (static and dynamic balance, strength, and submaximal fitness). Physical activity (PA) levels were assessed at preseason and at the mid-point of the caddying season. Across the caddying season, participants completed a monthly average of 24.0 (3.8) rounds. Results: Following the caddying season, improvements in static balance (Δ = 13.5 s), dynamic balance (Δ = −1.8 s), and lower back absolute strength (Δ = 112.8 N), and muscle quality (Δ = 2.0 N·kg−1) were observed (all P &lt; .05). Additionally, blood lipids, including total cholesterol (Δ = −0.6 mmol·L−1), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Δ = 0.1 mmol·L−1), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (Δ = −0.6 mmol·L−1) (all P &lt; .05), and body composition, including body mass (Δ = −2.7 kg), fat mass (Δ = −1.9 kg), fat percentage (Δ = −1.4%), fat-to-muscle ratio (Δ = −0.03), and body mass index (Δ = −0.9 kg·m−2) (all P &lt; .05) improved. Caddying did not offer beneficial changes to cardiovascular variables or cardiorespiratory fitness (P &gt; .05), while coronary heart disease risk score decreased (Δ = −3.3%) (P &lt; .05). In relation to PA, light- (Δ = 145 min) and moderate-intensity (Δ = 71 min) PA, moderate to vigorous PA (Δ = 73 min), and total PA (Δ = 218 min) between preseason and the mid-point of the caddying season increased, while sedentary time (Δ = −172 min) decreased (all P &lt; .05). Conclusion: Golf caddying can provide several physical health benefits such as improvements in various markers of cardiometabolic health, lower back absolute strength, and static and dynamic balance. The physical health improvements that caddying offers is likely contributed to by increased PA volume and intensity through walking on the golf course. Therefore, caddying may represent a feasible model for increasing PA volume and intensity and achieve physical health–related benefits

    What do we know about ‘rape myth’ research and the claim that there is ‘overwhelming evidence’ that juries are prejudiced in rape trials?

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    This paper examines the research by Fiona Leverick and demonstrates the methodological flaws in much of the ‘rape myth’ and mock jury research. Other ideas about rape myths and the ‘justice gap’ are explored and seen to be questionable. Furthermore, through a detailed examination of the rape myth acceptance scales, which Leverick describes as being ‘scientifically validated’, we trace the ideological and political-ethical nature of these scales and show a clear one-sidedness in how researchers have used them. Most particularly, we find that there is one-sidedness when it comes to the question of victim empathy. One result of this is that mock jury research has indicated that victim empathetic participants are finding individuals guilty of rape, despite the lack of evidence, and almost nothing has been said about the potential miscarriages of justice being demonstrated in these cases. The argument is thus made that rather than there being overwhelming evidence of rape myth prejudices amongst the public, there appears to be a one-sidedness amongst most rape myth researchers that is encouraging a sentiment of victim empathy that could distort the principles of justice regarding defendants being innocent until proven guilty based on a need to prove guilt beyond reasonable doubt.</p

    Iron oxide nanoparticles for treatment and diagnosis of chronic inflammatory diseases:a systematic review

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    Chronic inflammatory conditions are among the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Several debilitating diseases such as atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's are linked to chronic inflammation. These conditions often develop into complex and fatal conditions, making early detection and treatment of chronic inflammation crucial. Current diagnostic methods show high variability and do not account for disease heterogeneity and disease-specific proinflammatory markers, often delaying the disease detection until later stages. Furthermore, existing treatment strategies, including high-dose anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, have significant side effects and an increased risk of infections. In recent years, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have shown tremendous biomedical potential. SPIONs can function as imaging modalities for magnetic resonance imaging, and as therapeutic agents due to their magnetic hyperthermia capability. Furthermore, the surface functionalization of SPIONs allows the detection of specific disease biomarkers and targeted drug delivery. This systematic review explores the utility of SPIONs against chronic inflammatory disorders, focusing on their dual role as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. We extracted studies indexed in the Web of Science database from the last 10 years (2013–2023), and applied systematic inclusion criteria. This resulted in a final selection of 38 articles, which were analyzed for nanoparticle characteristics, targeted diseases, in vivo and in vitro models used, and the efficacy of the therapeutic or diagnostic modalities. The results revealed that ultrasmall SPIONs are excellent for imaging arterial and neuronal inflammation. Furthermore, novel therapies using SPIONs loaded with chemotherapeutic drugs show promise in the treatment of inflammatory diseases

    Game design as play:players as designers

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    This document discusses the design and development of the Game Design as Play: Players as Designers research project. Game Design as Play is a project investigating games that are actively designed by their players during play through both a series of workshops and the development of a tabletop game called making it up as we go along.making it up as we go along draws from the philosopher Peter Suber’s Nomic (Suber, 1990), Bernie De Koven’s concept of the Well-Played Game (De Koven,2013), and concepts from critical pedagogy (Freire, 2017) and participatory art (Bishop, 2012),, in an attempt to flatten the hierarchy between game designer and game player. Players take turns to add and remove rules from the game as they play, acting as both game designer and player, and by necessity engaging in a dialogue about game design and their shared interest in playing together.</div

    Effect of ultrasound and additives treatment as mitigation strategies to reduce acrylamide formation in potato crisps on industrial scale

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    The aim of this work was to examine the applicability on large scale of additives and ultrasound treatments during soaking of potatoes before frying to mitigate the formation of acrylamide in potato crisps. Calcium chloride and citric acid were applied at laboratory scale in various concentrations and orders during washing before frying, to establish optimum conditions which were scaled up to pilot plant. Up to 91.0% reduction in acrylamide was obtained at laboratory scale. Both concentration and order of additives influenced the extent of the mitigation observed, with a higher concentration of additive in the second wash being beneficial. When upscaled to factory pilot plant, the reduction observed was not consistent across the three trials, with a 33.4% reduction in the first trial but no significant reduction in following studies. A 2-min ultrasound treatment was applied in two trials to test various powers and amplitudes, and washing combinations respectively. Up to 67.1% of acrylamide reduction was recorded after 2 min of ultrasound treatment in the cold wash followed by hot wash; however, ultrasound treatment was not effective in reducing acrylamide or its precursors when solely applied or when followed by cold wash under the tested conditions of duration and power

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