Ohio Memory

    Anti-Nixon demonstrators in downtown Columbus

    No full text
    A crowd demonstrates against President Richard Nixon near the intersection of North Third Street and East Broad Street in downtown Columbus, Ohio, ca. 1973. In 1974, President Nixon would resign as a result of the Watergate Affair, a political scandal involving illegal activities of members of his administration. The Columbus Free Press began as a bi-weekly publication in Columbus, Ohio, in 1970. An underground newspaper, it replaced the Ohio State University publication The People, Yes. The earliest known issue of the newspaper appeared on January 4, 1971. The newspaper underwent a series of name changes over the decades, with titles including the Columbus Free Press & Cowtown Times (1972-1976), the Columbus Freepress (1976-1992) and The Free Press (1992-1995). The paper, which covered many liberal and progressive causes, was an alternative to mainstream news sources in central Ohio with the slogan “The Other Side of the News.” In 1995, the paper ceased publication briefly before reemerging as a website in early 1996, and returning as a print publication under the Free Press title in the form of a quarterly journal in 1998. Published under various frequencies during the first part of the 21st century, the Free Press again became a nonprofit monthly publication in 2017 with both a print and web presence, published by the Columbus Institute for Contemporary Journalism and operated by a volunteer staff and board

    Columbus Free Press subscription form

    No full text
    Order form encouraging recipients to renew their subscription to the Columbus Free Press. The Columbus Free Press began as a bi-weekly publication in Columbus, Ohio, in 1970. An underground newspaper, it replaced the Ohio State University publication The People, Yes. The earliest known issue of the newspaper appeared on January 4, 1971. The newspaper underwent a series of name changes over the decades, with titles including the Columbus Free Press & Cowtown Times (1972-1976), the Columbus Freepress (1976-1992) and The Free Press (1992-1995). The paper, which covered many liberal and progressive causes, was an alternative to mainstream news sources in central Ohio with the slogan “The Other Side of the News.” In 1995, the paper ceased publication briefly before reemerging as a website in early 1996, and returning as a print publication under the Free Press title in the form of a quarterly journal in 1998. Published under various frequencies during the first part of the 21st century, the Free Press again became a nonprofit monthly publication in 2017 with both a print and web presence, published by the Columbus Institute for Contemporary Journalism and operated by a volunteer staff and board.Columbus FREE PRESS P.O. Box 3162 Columbus, Ohio 43210 Dear Subscriber, Your subscription to the FREE PRESS has expired. If you would like to renew it, please fill in the attached form and mail it to us with $5 for one yeai^s worth of the FREE PRESS or $8 for a two year subscription. The money you send us not only signs you up to get the FREE PRESS in your mail box, but helps us cover the cost of mailing free subscriptions to over 300 prisoners in Ohio. Please send in your renewal today. Thank you. In struggle, the FREE PRESS staff Yes, I would like to renew my subsciption to the Columbus FREE PRESS. I enclose my check or money order for S3 one year subscription $8 two year subscription address city & state & zip remark

    Columbus Free Press newsletter

    No full text
    Newsletter sent to Columbus Free Press staff and volunteers, documenting the current financial status of the newspaper and relevant news. The Columbus Free Press began as a bi-weekly publication in Columbus, Ohio, in 1970. An underground newspaper, it replaced the Ohio State University publication The People, Yes. The earliest known issue of the newspaper appeared on January 4, 1971. The newspaper underwent a series of name changes over the decades, with titles including the Columbus Free Press & Cowtown Times (1972-1976), the Columbus Freepress (1976-1992) and The Free Press (1992-1995). The paper, which covered many liberal and progressive causes, was an alternative to mainstream news sources in central Ohio with the slogan “The Other Side of the News.” In 1995, the paper ceased publication briefly before reemerging as a website in early 1996, and returning as a print publication under the Free Press title in the form of a quarterly journal in 1998. Published under various frequencies during the first part of the 21st century, the Free Press again became a nonprofit monthly publication in 2017 with both a print and web presence, published by the Columbus Institute for Contemporary Journalism and operated by a volunteer staff and board.COLUMBUS FREE PRESS NEWSLETTER ON VOL. 8 #4 (out 4/12/78) FINANCIAL STATEMENT 3/20/78 Incoming: cash on hand $46.00 Outgoing: mailing 8 #3 $ 40.00 $ due on #3 75.12 LNS 40.00 Capital Care, 42.84 print 8#4 400.00 #1, 2 ________ mailing 8 #4 40.00 $163-96 supplies 20.00 $540.00 As you can see, we are, as usual, in pretty bad shape. We have other incoming accounts, all very past due. There are three large ones which will be paid off in time—people just don't have the money to pay up right now. Monkey Retreat $45.00; Spatter, Gittes, Marshall & Terzian $121. 98; and Mystic-Occult $90.00. Other outstanding debts to the FP include Shotgun Sound (,$50.00), Marvin Gardens ($65.00) and For All Heads ($12.50). Advertising was not the only source of revenue for 8 #3: Rosanne Friedlander donated $40.00, Libby Gregory donated $42.09 and John Quigley loaned the paper $60.00. Anything anybody does to help would help. ARTICLES LIST FOR 8 #4 News: Labor Day Trials, Jeff Coleman Features: Lotta Crabtree's Last Stand (photo w/cap- Battelle Stock Portfolio, Paul Hogan tion), Gail Meese/Susie Simpson update-Steve Sterrett An Unmarried Woman (movie review), Francie Coalition Against Sexist Advertising, Libby Barton 3rd Ave. Co-op Open (photo), ? Recipe, ? (Gail, Sandy, ?) Harrison West, Rosanne Cartoon*, Paul Volker "Choice"-a childbirth alternative, Sima Gellman Laetril, Jean Levinson/Steve Molk Halfway House for Women (picture story), Sandy DiCenzo Keep your eyes open for interesting shorts, (I have collected 5 so far, L.) And keep your ears tuned for material for page 2. We have so far received one letter—its a complaint about a restaurant named "Periwinkles" and it's very long for what it says. Call 294 - 2062 if you have articles to add to the articles list for 8 #4!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! CLEAN UP CLEAN UP CLEAN UP CLEAN UP & & & & & DISCUSSION DISCUSSION DISCUSSION DISCU Sunday, March 26 we'll be having a discussion of the organizational document Steve Rcthman has developed for the paper. We're not planning on making any lasting decisions right then and there—simply discussing it as a group. For those of us who haven't seen a copy, there are several at Trade Winds and in the office. Steve welcomes feedback—call him at 299-8069. We are going to take out the garbage prior to this meeting. Everyone gets a bag—there's a least one per customer. And we have an enormous table to dismantle and take upstairs, too—its a very good, solid, wired layout table, --donated by Steve Molk. Our monthly potluck will be at 6:30 PM, April 2. Please come & bring something yummy. At the office. Copy Deadline for 8 #4 is April 5 Layout is April 7, 8, 9, & 10 ****There is still plenty of filing to do.******We now have a little phone directory—don't lose it!!

    Teacher and student in French class

    No full text
    A teacher assists a student during French class in this color slide photographed by Allen Zak for the Columbus Free Press newspaper. The Columbus Free Press began as a bi-weekly publication in Columbus, Ohio, in 1970. An underground newspaper, it replaced the Ohio State University publication The People, Yes. The earliest known issue of the newspaper appeared on January 4, 1971. The newspaper underwent a series of name changes over the decades, with titles including the Columbus Free Press & Cowtown Times (1972-1976), the Columbus Freepress (1976-1992) and The Free Press (1992-1995). The paper, which covered many liberal and progressive causes, was an alternative to mainstream news sources in central Ohio with the slogan “The Other Side of the News.” In 1995, the paper ceased publication briefly before reemerging as a website in early 1996, and returning as a print publication under the Free Press title in the form of a quarterly journal in 1998. Published under various frequencies during the first part of the 21st century, the Free Press again became a nonprofit monthly publication in 2017 with both a print and web presence, published by the Columbus Institute for Contemporary Journalism and operated by a volunteer staff and board

    [1977] State Library of Ohio Board Meeting Minutes

    No full text
    Minutes of meetings of the Board of the State Library of Ohio

    [1986] State Library of Ohio Board Meeting Minutes

    No full text
    Minutes of meetings of the Board of the State Library of Ohio

    [1988-1989] State Library of Ohio Board Meeting Minutes

    No full text
    Minutes of meetings of the Board of the State Library of Ohio

    [1998] State Library Board Meeting minutes

    No full text

    Other title: Federal Bureau of Investigation background check procedures

    No full text
    Revised: 01-14-19; Flyer; "Dave Yost, Ohio Attorney General."; "Civilian Identification Office.

    Other title: Study of artificial intelligence based methods for characterization of geotechnical site investigation data

    No full text
    "February 2020."; "Final technical report, May. 2019-Jan. 2019"--Technical report documentation page; "Task #6"--Cover; Includes bibliographical references (pages 50-51); Final technical reportDue to the inadequate knowledge of the soil forming histories and/or human activities, the subsurface soil layers are difficult to ascertain. Subsurface uncertainty and its influence on geotechnical design have long been a challenge facing practitioners. Recently, the ASCE Geo-institute has developed the Data Interchange for Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists (DIGGS), which is a standard schema for transferring geotechnical data between multiple organizations. It paves the way of sharing and unifying datasets and forms a structural database for further data-driven modeling and analysis. The Office of Geotechnical Engineering at ODOT (OGE) is taking a national leading role in supporting the development efforts of DIGGS and hence make this project possible. In this study, site investigation data in DIGGS format and archived format are jointly processed. An innovative technique developed by the research team has been further improved for better application in real-world projects. Bayesian machine learning is integrated with Markov random field models to infer and simulate subsurface models and geospatial data with quantified uncertainty. Spatial heterogeneity and statistical characteristics are modeled in terms of statistical and spatial patterns. These patterns serve as a basis to provide a synthesized interpretation of the soil profiles with uncertainty quantified. Four (4) validation projects have been performed in this report and the results are well documented. Summary and recommendations for future work are also provided. A short introduction of the key concepts behind this technique, and pathway for converting the existing program into a ready for implementation web-based program for potential ODOT usages are provided in the appendice
    Ohio Memory is based in US
    Do you manage Ohio Memory? Access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Dashboard!