GettDigital (Gettysburg College Digital Collections)

    G6710 1631 .H66 - Italia nuovamente piu' perfetta che mai per inanzi posta in luce scolpita et con le suoi figure vivamente rappresentate

    No full text
    Map of ItalyDepicts Romulus and Remus with wolfAmsterda

    Parsons - Louis Alexander Parsons (1912)

    No full text
    Professor of PhysicsSpectrum 1913 p. 4 (The 1913 Spectrum is dedicated to him

    Ivory seal

    No full text
    With the inscription qin cì, ('bestowed by the Imperial household') on one side of the base, this remarkable square ivory seal may initially give the impression that it might have been a gift given to one of the Emperor's subjects or a high ranking official. This implication is furthered by another five-character inscription 'Jù Rén Shào Dao Su,' (probably the name of the Taoist priest Shào Dao Su) on the other side. On the opposite side, there are four characters qing jing yuan mo, meaning 'feeling serene in reflective quietness.' All inscriptions on these three sides of the base are written in the Regular Style. The bottom base of the seal echoes the same four well-balanced characters qing jing yuan mo, written in the Small Seal style. The lines have even thickness and the characters are very elongated so that they may fit neatly into a square. These four characters refer to a scholar's philosophical context. Therefore, they confirm that this seal is not from the Imperial Court. The inscriptions are mechanically uniform, implying that they were not written with a brush before being carved. The seal is made of elephant tusk ivory with remarkable grain and an antique finish. The handle is fashioned in the shape of the Ju-I (as you wish) with two identical sides, each carrying a symmetrical design of two storks (longevity) flying amidst a cloud on each side. There is an exceeding residue of vermilion ink paste on the base and the joined area between the handle and the seal. One missing corner of the base was mended with a fitting section of a different ivory color. Based on the overall physical inspection and stylistic examination, and despite its antique finish, this seal is probably a recent reproduction

    Ivory pendant

    No full text
    One of a set of twelve pendants carved from ivory. They represent animals, human figures, and plants. All of the objects are flat for the most part, allowing them to be stood on a hard surface. This would also make the pendants sit better while hanging from the chest of the person who wears them. This object represents a man lying on his belly with his hands folded under his chin

    Ivory pendant

    No full text
    One of a set of twelve pendants carved from ivory. They represent animals, human figures, and plants. All of the objects are flat for the most part, allowing them to be stood on a hard surface. This would also make the pendants sit better while hanging from the chest of the person who wears them. This object represents a water buffalo

    Chalcedony Xi Wang mu

    No full text
    Chalcedony carving of Xi Wang mu, Goddess of the West, with a bird by her side, and holding a peach branch over her shoulder and a single peach in her other hand. Her wood stand is carved in a peach tree pattern. Xi Wang mu grows peaches of longevity in her garden. The peach blossom symbolizes the female gender, the wood of the tree drives away evil spirits. Her emblem is a bluebird

    Chrysanthemum bowl with loose rings

    No full text
    The translucent white bowl has the shape of a chrysanthemum that is echoed in the two small chrysanthemum blossoms that adorn the handles. There is a loose ring on each handle. The whole bowl and its elements are carved in the same medium. Although the chrysanthemum has not been listed in most resources of Buddhist symbols in Chinese and Tibetan cultures, it generally symbolized power and protection in early Asian culture. The ancient Chinese considered it an emblem of the autumnal season. The flower played an important part in the decorative embellishments of their various ritual vessels prepared for the observance of the numerous ceremonies dedicated to the natural essences of the autumn of both Nature and Life. The aristocrats used small bowls in which to serve a special drink made from the dried petals of the chrysanthemum flower mixed with a wine mixture that is similar in appearance to tea. Whether this elegant bowl is carved with Agate or Tibetan jade, it is exquisitely and intricately executed. The wooden base has a stylized chrysanthemum motif

    Small white two-handled bowl

    No full text
    This two handled ornate cup of pure white jade takes the form of an archaistic vessel based upon an ancient bronze. It is thin, translucent, and very elegant. Although the cup itself is undecorated, the two handles are sophisticatedly designed with a refined version of the fierce animal masks, the T'ao T'ieh*, which dominated in the art of the previous dynasties. This motif had already existed during the Song jade vessels and prevailed during the Qing. The two dragon-like heads latch themselves up to the rim of the cup. In the case of this vessel, the T'ao T'ieh motif faces toward the cup, whereas in most jade vessels of the same period it usually faces outward. Since the T'ao T'ieh design on the handles has the Hu or Tiger motif, the cup appears to have been dedicated to the Spiritual Influences for the benefit of the living. It may have also been used in supplication to the Deified Heroes of ancient times, to the Gods of medicine and wealth or on funeral ritualistic objects

    Large vase with blue-and-white moulded appliqué

    No full text
    This is a large vase with a flaring mouth, a straight neck, slanting shoulders, bulging body tapering to the bottom and a splayed foot. The original handles are missing from the shoulders. The background of this vase is primarily in a pea green (dou qing*) glaze. The mouthrim is mounted with a dark brown glaze, below which is a grayish brown followed by a band of regular and dense dark brown splashes. The exterior of the bulging body is primarily decorated with a blue-and-white moulded appliqué san xing (Three Star Gods), Fu (God of Good Fortune), Lu (God of High Official Income), and Shou (God of Longevity) theme. The Three Star Gods are shown standing and zuo yi-ing (making a slight bow with hands folded in front) to each other underneath a Chinese parasol tree (wu tong shu), and under the sun among clouds. The Shou, a smiling old bald man, is on the left with his emblem peach in his right hand. In the middle is the Lu, wearing an exquisite official hat symbolic of his identity and looking slightly to the right. A deer, used as a pun for the word lu or high official income, is running in the foreground. The Fu, a cheerful old man, is on the right. A bat is flying over on the far right. The bat is a pun for the word fu or good fortune. The interior and the base of the footring are in a greenish white glaze. The bottom rim of the footring is unglazed, exposing the white body. It is highly likely that this vase was produced in the folk kilns because it has no reign marks. In terms of the decorative elements and style, this piece was probably made during the late Qing period. * Dou qing is a celadon glaze created in the Longquan kiln in the Song dynasty. Its color is green with a yellowish tinge which is similar to that of peas. This glaze is less lustrous than plum green and powder green. After the Ming dynasty, the pea green glaze became pale and elegant. Besides the monochrome pea green ware, wares with the overglaze decoration or underglaze blue design on a pea green ground were fired during the Qing period

    Miniature "lian" vessel

    No full text
    The Chinese have always had a perpetual awareness and a sense of connection to the values of the past; they consciously re-examine it from time to time. Throughout Chinese history from the Song to subsequent dynasties, a self-conscious reproduction of archaic forms was an effort to record ancient practices and to revive the past. Artifacts in ancient forms covered from tombs of the Southern Song and Yuan periods show evidence of this approach. The shift from viewing the past as a source of true values to be exploited for current political concerns led to a very eclectic access to antiquities of all sorts. Great collections were formed by Emperors and their officials. Jade became a metaphorical expression of power. During the late Ming period economic expansion produced a new class of wealthy people who were willing to invest in objects of antiquity as a form of material possession, and not for their ritualistic values and practices. Small objects like this carving were evidently for personal enjoyment rather than for use in rituals or burial. This miniature vessel takes the shape of a vessel known as the lian* in the Song dynasty. Its cylindrical body rests on three small legs. The carving has an austere tubular form and a smooth surface decorated with parallel grooves around the body in the style of the later phase of the Song and Jin dynasties (c. 13th-14th A.D.). This type of object continued to be produced in the Yuan, Ming, and Qing periods. The square and round shapes of bronze and jade vessels often reflected the ancient Chinese thought of "The heaven is round and the earth is square" (see object #113 a square wine cup). This miniature jade vessel may have been carved some time during the early Ming period, when earlier forms were reproduced, with cruder and less artistic characteristics compared to those of subsequent times. * The lian form was later manifested in the Longquan porcelain
    GettDigital (Gettysburg College Digital Collections) is based in US
    Do you manage GettDigital (Gettysburg College Digital Collections)? Access insider analytics, issue reports and manage access to outputs from your repository in the CORE Dashboard!