Georgia Southern University: Digital Commons@Georgia Southern

    Effective Critical Media Literacy Pedagogy in Higher Education: Turning Social Justice Theory into Practice

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    Critical media literacy education is a social justice-based pedagogy that seeks to engage and empower students for the 21st century political economy through developing a critical awareness of media. It can be a component of any course that adopts a critical view of media. Scholars have suggested that the outcomes of an effective critical media literacy education are increased student engagement, critical awareness of media, civic engagement, empowerment, and adoption of a social justice agenda. Yet critical media education is not widely offered in institutions of higher education. As a result, there are few empirical studies that investigate the extent to which hypothesized critical media literacy learning outcomes are actualized. Scholars therefore do not have a strong understanding of what constitutes effective critical media literacy pedagogy in higher education. This mixed-methods sequential explanatory study will develop an understanding of what an effective critical media literacy education looks like and offer a strategy for its implementation by educational leaders in institutions of higher learning. This will potentially enable colleges and universities to produce educators who can in turn educate students to be equitable participants in the 21st century political economy. The study addresses two overarching research questions: • What constitutes a satisfactory level of “implementation” for critical media literacy pedagogy? • How are the desired outcomes of effective critical media literacy met in higher education? The instrumentation for the study included student surveys and interviews, classroom observations, faculty interviews, and a review of course and campus documents. The study administered pre- and post-course surveys to students enrolled in courses that study media from a critical perspective. The surveys provided data to indicate whether the classrooms studied were generating any of the desired outcomes of a critical media literacy education. This data was then triangulated with the qualitative data—the observations, student interviews, faculty interviews, and document review—to identify how specific patterns of curriculum and pedagogies related to specific desired outcomes. The data for the study derived from eight different US higher education institutions. The eleven courses who contributed data to this study were comprised of the following disciplines: Communication, Community Development and Applied Economics, Media Studies, History, Sociology, and Social Science. In all, eight professors were interviewed and observed. A total of 241 students completed the pre-survey and 177 students completed the post survey. A total of 38 students participated in telephone interviews. The six main themes gleaned from the data in this study included Engaging and Inspiring Instructor, A Critical Perspective, Inequality And Oppression, Student Participation, Contemporary Content And Tools, and Resistance And Activism. The study reviews the relationship between critical media literacy educators’ goals and methods and student outcomes

    Critical Media Literacy and Climate Change

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    For years, environmental problems in the US have been represented in mainstream media as issues of universal vulnerability, as if everyone were affected equally by the environmental dangers. This hid the fact that low-income neighborhoods, especially communities of color, have been impacted with far worse consequences of environmental hazards than middle and upper class areas. The other trope too often repeated in the media, is the notion of universal responsibility; the idea that we are all equally responsible for the environmental damages. While it is important that everyone contribute to improving the environment, it is also essential that corporations, governments, and non-sustainable economic practices and ideologies be held responsible for the majority of the harm they are causing to the environment. In this presentation we will use critical media literacy pedagogy to explore the historical context of portrayals of environmentalism in relation to current media messages about climate change and environmental justice. The better people can learn to deconstruct media messages and dominant ideologies, the more prepared they will be to construct their own media messages that can challenge the dominant myths and promote socially just alternatives for a more sustainable and healthier planet

    2012 SSWC Program

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    Progra

    Mamaws, Nannas, & Gigis: Exploring Diversity and Global Connectedness Through Personal Stories

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    Stories have the power to connect us, to promote compassion and empathy among all societies. This session will examine how they can serve as a powerful avenue for fostering an appreciation and understanding of culture, that of our own and of others. Through storytelling, we will explore diversity while building the “democracy of the intellect” (Short, 2012. p. 16)

    Cross-Cultural Mentoring and Advocacy for African-American Female Counselor Educators Seeking Promotion

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    African-American female counselor educators face multicultural barriers in the promotion process. Cross-cultural mentoring bridges the gap between privileged faculty gatekeepers and minority female counselor educators seeking promotion. This presentation examines barriers to the promotion of African-American female counselor educators and examines leadership, advocacy, and social change strategies that promote successful cross-cultural mentoring to diversify counselor education faculty

    2002 AASU Men\u27s Basketball Statistics

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    Summer 2006 AASU Data Digest

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    Summer 2014 Armstrong Enrollment Executive Summary

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