556,365 research outputs found

    The role of landholder education in adoption of soil health management systems

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    Management for soil health has received increasing attention, but, despite this, adoption of soil health management plans (SHM) has been slow and is possibly affected by landholder education. This paper investigates the role of landholder education in the adoption of SHM systems, using salinity and sodicity as indicators. Through the use of a landholder response mail based survey consisting of likert scale rank questions, categorical responses and open ended questions, education was shown to mildly affect the adoption of SHM programs, but was not considered an overriding impediment by landholders. However, there is a disparity between education as an impediment and landholders knowledge. This disparity is potentially overcome by a reliance on agronomists and extension officers to guide landholders through SHM issues that they find complex. In terms of managing soils for salinity, education was shown to be adequate, although for sodicity education is still a major limiting factor

    The Adoption and Management of Soil Conservation Practices in Haiti: The Case of Rock Walls

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    Farmers are usually reluctant to adopt measures to reduce the toll of soil erosion; and even when soil conservation structures are adopted, farmers fail to manage them. This study investigates factors that influence adoption and management of soil conservation structures in Fort-Jacques, Haiti. The results show that personal characteristics of farmers, institutional factors, such as local group membership, training in soil conservation, per capita income and size of farm influence soil conservation adoption in Forte-Jacques. Age, education, per capita household income, participation in local groups, the interaction of per capita household income and farmers’ age influence rock wall management.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    CHOICES OF SOIL CONSERVATION METHODS ON KWAZULU-NATAL COMMERCIAL SUGARCANE FARMS

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    A Principal components analysis and multiple regression techniques are used to analyse heterogeneity in 53 KwaZulu-Natal sugarcane farmers soil conservation decisions. Minimum tillage and construction of water carrying terraces are the most common methods used, whereas trash mulching is least commonly practised. Results indicate that farmers' demands for soil conservation, their demands for other attributes of soil conservation practices and interactions between practices are important to explaining their choices. Intra-farm variation in use of soil conservation methods is small relative to inter-farm variation. Education programmes, provision of information, and improving farmers' technical soil conservation skills have implications for aggregate soil conservation adoption, whereas the types of information provided, fire insurance programmes and soil conservation subsidies have implications for the combinations of practices adopted.Crop Production/Industries, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Farm Fresh Foods: What to Know About Growing and Selling Produce in Buffalo

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    It details local regulations on market and community gardens as well as rules for selling produce. It includes tips to find the right locations to plant food gardens and opportunities for education on growing and selling. It addresses topics such as plant selection and soil safety

    The Influence of Social Capital on Natural Resource Management in Marginal Areas of Kenya

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    This paper analyzes the influence of social capital on the farmers' perception of the soil erosion problem and the level of investments in soil conservation in marginal areas of Kenya. It uses data from a survey of 321 households in Machakos and Taita-Taveta Districts. A Heckman's two-step model is applied to assess the influence of social capital on investments in soil conservation by farmers. Results show that the education level of the household head, slope of farmers' fields, proportion of off-farm income, and the status of soil erosion are significant determinants of the likelihood of farmers recognizing soil erosion as an important problem. Household size, slope, land tenure security, membership diversity, age of household head, farm size per capita and membership in groups influence investments in soil control measures such as terraces. The effects, however, are location-specific. The policy challenge is to establish and strengthen social capital elements that have a strong influence on communities undertaking soil conservation measures to promote sustainable agriculture, and improve land tenure security.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Risk Preferences as Determinants of Soil Conservation Decisions in Ethiopia

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    Soil degradation is one of the most serious environmental problems in the highlands of Ethiopia. The prevalence of traditional agricultural land use and the absence of appropriate resource management often result in the degradation of natural soil fertility. This has important implications for soil productivity, household food security, and poverty. Given the extreme vulnerability of farmers in this area, we hypothesized that farmers’ risk preferences might affect the sustainability of resource use. This study presents experimental results on the willingness of farmers to take risks and relates the subjective risk preferences to actual soil conservation decisions. The study looks at a random sample of 143 households with 597 farming plots. We found that a high degree of risk aversion significantly decreases the probability of adopting soil conservation. This implies that reducing farmers’ risk exposure could promote soil conservation practices and thus more sustainable natural resource management. This might be achieved by improving tenure security, promoting access to extension services and education, and developing off-farm activities that generate income.adoption, Ethiopia, risk preference, soil conservation

    A global perspective on soil science education at third educational level; knowledge, practice, skills and challenges

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    The pivotal role of soil as a resource is not fully appreciated by the general public. Improving education in soil science represents a challenge in a world where soil resources are under serious threat. Today’s high school students, the world’s future landowners, agriculturalists, and decision makers, have the potential to change society’s apathy towards soils issues. This research aimed to compare the level of soil education in high and/or secondary schools in forty-three countries worldwide, together comprising 62% of the world's population. Comparisons were made between soil science content discussed in educationally appropriate textbooks via a newly proposed soil information coefficient (SIC). Interviews with teachers were undertaken to better understand how soil science education is implemented in the classroom. Statistical analyses were investigated using clustering. Results showed that gaps in soil science education were most commonly observed in countries where soil science is a non-compulsory or optional subject. Soil science concepts are predominantly a part of geography or environmental science curricula. Consequently, considerable variability in soil science education systems among investigated countries exists. Soil information coefficient‘s outcomes demonstrated that a methodological approach combining textbooks and the use of modern digitally based strategies in the educational process significantly improved soil education performances. Overall, soil science education is under-represented in schools worldwide. Dynamic new approaches are needed to improve pivotal issues such as: i) promoting collaborations and agreements between high school and universities; ii) encouraging workshops and practical exercises such as field activities; and, iii) implementing technology tools. This, in turn, will prepare the next generation to contribute meaningfully towards solving present and future soil problems

    Modelling Water Flow and Solute Transport for Horticultural and Environmental Management

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    During the past 10 years, the simulation model SWAP (Soil, Water, Atmosphere, Plant) was developed by the Sub-Department Water Resources of Wageningen University jointly with the Department Water and Environment of Alterra Green World Research. SWAP simulates vertical transport of water, solutes and heat in variably saturated, cultivated soils at field scale level and during whole growing seasons. Different versions of the model have been applied worldwide in research, education and as a decision support tool in the management of agricultural, horticultural and natural systems water flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous soils with or without the influence of groundwater. The main features of and theoretical concepts behind SWAP are described, in particular soil water flow, solute transport and crop growth

    Creating a typology of tobacco farms according to determinants of diversification in Valle de Lerma (Salta-Argentina)

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    The objective of this article is to identify typical tobacco farms according to determinants of diversification that can be used to explore possibilities of diversification in the province of Salta (Northwest of Argentina). National Agriculture Census data of 278 farms in the main tobacco production area of Salta were used for the analysis. The variables selected concerning determinants of diversification were: land area, irrigation, general capital goods and specific capital goods, ownership of land, education, off-farm work, and labour availability. The analysis of the principal components applied to 16 selected variables allowed to reduce the dimensionality of the data to four components. Those components were used to apply K-means cluster approach to classify the farms. Four clusters were determined. Cluster 1 and Cluster 2 are the largest clusters. These concern highly specialized tobacco farms. They differ regarding determinants for diversification due to different levels of education of the farmer and different levels of off-farm work. Both clusters are interesting for further analysis regarding diversification alternatives to maintain or improve income and to reduce soil degradation. Cluster 3 concerns large tobacco farms being somewhat less specialized than the farms in Clusters 1 and 2. Intensive tobacco production makes this group interesting for exploring diversification alternatives to improve soil conditions. Farms in Cluster 4 already have a high level of diversification with substantial livestock production. The presence of perennial pastures suggests a better soil management than the other clusters. This cluster looks appealing to investigate what can be done regarding diversification

    Capacity Building Needs Of Lecturers of Agricultural Education In Soil Testing For Effective Teaching Of Students In Colleges Of Education In South-East, Nigeria.

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    The main purpose of this study was to determine capacity building needs of lecturers of agricultural education in soil testing (NPK) for effective teaching of students in Colleges of Education in South-easth, Nigeria. Four research questions guided the study. The study adopted descriptive survey research design. The study was conducted in 8 Colleges of Education in South-east, Nigerian offering Agricultural Education programme. The population of the study was 107 lecturers. The entire population was involved in the study. An instrument titled Soil Testing Capacity Building Needs Questionnaire (STCBNQ) was used for data collection. Three experts face validated the questionnaire. Cronbach alpha reliability method was used to determine the internal consistency of the questionnaire items. A reliability coefficient of 0.90 was obtained. Data collected for the study were analyzed using weighted mean, standard deviation and Improvement Need-Performance Index (INPI) to answer the research questions. It was found out from the study that lecturers of Agricultural Education in Colleges of needed capacity building on  12 items in soil sampling,  6 items in testing for soil Nitrogen,  9 items in testing for soil Phosphorus and 9 items in testing for soil Potassium for effective teaching of students in Colleges of Education in South-east, Nigeria. It was recommended that lecturers of Agricultural Education in Colleges of Education should utilize the findings of this study on their capacity building needs to seek for sponsorship from their administrators in order to attend re-training programme for their capacity building in soil testing and analysis among others. Keywords: capacity building, lecturers of agricultural education, soil testing, soil sampling, Nitrogen-Phosphorus-Potassium
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