1,033,233 research outputs found

    Patterns of Dental Service Utilization Following Nontraumatic Dental Condition Visits to the Emergency Department in Wisconsin Medicaid

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    Objectives: To examine patterns of dental service utilization for adult Medicaid enrollees in Wisconsin following nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC) visits to the emergency department (ED). Methods: This is a retrospective, observational study of claims for NTDC visits to the ED and dental service encounters from the Wisconsin Medicaid Evaluation and Decision Support database (2001-2009). We used competing risk models to predict probabilities of returning to the ED versus obtaining follow-up care from a dentist. Results: We observed a 43 percent increase in the rate of NTDC visits to the ED, with most of this increase occurring from 2001 to 2005. Within 30 days of an NTDC visit to the ED, ∼29.6 percent of enrollees will first visit a dentist office, while ∼9.9 percent will return to the ED. Young to middle-aged adults (18 toyears) and enrollees living in counties with a lower supply of dental providers were more likely to return to the ED following a NTDC visit. Among the enrollees that first visited a dental office following an ED visit, 37.6 percent had an extraction performed at this visit. Conclusions: Almost one in five adult Medicaid enrollees will subsequently return to the ED following a previous NTDC visit. The provision of definitive care for these individuals appears to primarily consist of extractions

    Conditioning prices on search behaviour

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    We consider a market in which �firms can partially observe each consumer's search behavior in the market. In our main model, a �firm knows whether a consumer is visiting it for the �first time or whether she is returning after a previous visit. Firms have an incentive to offer a lower price on a �first visit than a return visit, so that new consumers are offered a "buy-now" discount. The ability to offer such discounts acts to raise all prices in the market. If �firms cannot commit to their buy-later price, in many cases �firms make "exploding" offers, and consumers never return to a previously sampled �rm. Likewise, if �firms must charge the same price to all consumers, regardless of search history, we show that they sometimes have the incentive to make exploding offers. We also consider other ways in which �firms could use information about search behaviour to determine their prices

    Return Visit Admissions May Not Indicate Quality of Emergency Department Care for Children

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    ObjectiveThe objective was to test the hypothesis that in‐hospital outcomes are worse among children admitted during a return ED visit than among those admitted during an index ED visit.MethodsThis was a retrospective analysis of ED visits by children age 0 to 17 to hospitals in Florida and New York in 2013. Children hospitalized during an ED return visit within 7 days were classified as “ED return admissions” (discharged at ED index visit and admitted at return visit) or “readmissions” (admission at both ED index and return visits). In‐hospital outcomes for ED return admissions and readmissions were compared to “index admissions without return admission” (admitted at ED index visit without 7‐day return visit admission).ResultsAmong 1,886,053 index ED visits to 321 hospitals, 75,437 were index admissions without return admission, 7,561 were ED return admissions, and 1,333 were readmissions. ED return admissions had lower intensive care unit admission rates (11.0% vs. 13.6%; adjusted odds ratio = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.71 to 0.85), longer length of stay (3.51 days vs. 3.38 days; difference = 0.13 days; incidence rate ratio = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.07), but no difference in mean hospital costs ((7,138vs.7,138 vs. 7,331; difference = –193;95193; 95% CI = –479 to $93) compared to index admissions without return admission.ConclusionsCompared with children who experienced index admissions without return admission, children who are initially discharged from the ED who then have a return visit admission had lower severity and similar cost, suggesting that ED return visit admissions do not involve worse outcomes than do index admissions.Peer Reviewedhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/142896/1/acem13324_am.pdfhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/142896/2/acem13324.pd

    Return visit to a cemetery

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    Conditioning prices on search behaviour

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    We consider a market in which firms can partially observe each consumer's search behavior in the market. In our main model, a firm knows whether a consumer is visiting it for the first time or whether she is returning after a previous visit. Firms have an incentive to offer a lower price on a first visit than a return visit, so that new consumers are offered a "buy-now" discount. The ability to offer such discounts acts to raise all prices in the market. If firms cannot commit to their buy-later price, in many cases firms make "exploding" offers, and consumers never return to a previously sampled firm. Likewise, if firms must charge the same price to all consumers, regardless of search history, we show that they sometimes have the incentive to make exploding offers. We also consider other ways in which firms could use information about search behaviour to determine their prices.Consumer search; oligopoly; price discrimination; high-pressure selling; exploding offers; costly recall

    Visitors' experience in a modern art museum: a structural equation model

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    This study aims to provide a better understanding on the museum experience by studying visitors’ motivation, satisfaction and likelihood to return to the Museum for Modern and Contemporary Art (MART) of Rovereto (Italy). The empirical data were obtained from a survey undertaken from September to November 2009. A theoretical model to analyze the attractiveness factors of the museum based on two exogenous variables (push and pull motivation) and two endogenous variables (satisfaction and loyalty) is used and a structural equation model is estimated as a confirmatory tool of the hypothetical model. The findings reveal that tourists visiting the MART are mainly motivated by push factors, as relaxation, looking for a new experience and learn new things. Loyalty also positively influences the probability to return to the MART and recommend to friends and family. However, visit the city or the region of Trentino has no impact on satisfaction and loyalty to the MART. Besides, loyalty to MART does not imply the probability to recommend a visit to Rovereto

    The Influence of Destination Attributes and Quality of Experience on Return Visit Interest

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    This study aims to determine and analyze the Destination Attributes and Service Quality towards Return Visit Interest (Case Study of Floating Market Bandung). The research design used is casual research. The sampling technique used is non-probability sampling; the sampling technique used and suitable for this research is convenience sampling. Of the samples used are 125 samples meet the criteria. The data method uses a questionnaire. The findings in this study indicate that destination attributes have a positive and significant effect on return visit interest, and experience quality has a positive and significant effect on return visit interest. Keywords: Destination Attributes, Service Quality, Return Visit Interest DOI: 10.7176/JTHS/59-03 Publication date:December 31st 202
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