779,364 research outputs found

    An examination of the influences on health development post conflict : Angola-- in the transition : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, Aotearoa, New Zealand

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    This thesis examines the issues that influence health development post conflict. Its aim is to increase understanding of the current issues within the transitional post conflict phase through presenting the experiences of three communities in rural Angola. Having emerged from nearly 30 years of civil war, Angola remains in a challenging transitional period. This phase of rehabilitation, flanked by efforts of relief and development, is shown to be problematic. This thesis considers the process from conflict to peace and subsequent repatriation of population. It identifies the transitional phase between relief and development projects and the ambiguous linking of theory and practice within literature Discussion of appropriate health strategies for implementation shows the limitations of the primary health care (PHC) model. Concepts of community participation and empowerment are identified as difficult due to resettlement factors of time and planning. The methods of research include household surveys (181 completed), interviews, group discussions, and observations of three communities. Comparisons of the two groups of previously identified Internally Displaced People (IDPs) and Returned Refugees (RRs) are made throughout the thesis. A focus on the needs, wants, reality and use of health services reveals community participation and responsibility. The influences of identity (tribe, gender, IDP / RR) and past experiences of refuge, settlement, and education are recognised as impacting to varying degrees, knowledge, attitude and practice towards health services. The research concludes that the post conflict phase is impacted most strongly by community (identity), time and communication

    Valuing oral history in the community

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    CELT research project on changing practice through innovation and researchValuing Oral History in the community has developed out of the University���s involvement in the Wolverhampton Black and Ethnic Minority Experience Project (BEME). BEME is a collaborative project developed by a range of local community groups, the local council, colleges and the University which was established to document the experiences of members of the Black and Ethnic Minority communities in Wolverhampton in the post-war period. The rationale behind BEME was to create a community-based Oral History video archive and to promote the use of this unique source of community-based knowledge within a range of educational settings, to encourage curriculum development and enhance the learning experience of students. The aims of the innovation developed from my work with the BEME project, my own and others��� experiences of the value of doing Oral History with undergraduates and the desire to encourage the development of a more inclusive and diverse curriculum for the 21st century. Out of these aims three key objectives were developed

    長野県の竜丘村と滋野村を事例とした初期公民館の館報と戦前地域メディアの接続―その2 滋野村の事例―

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    This paper is the latter half of the paper which examines how the public hall newsletter of the early public hall is connected to the prewar local community media in the case of Tatsuoka Village and Shigeno Village in Nagano Prefecture. In this paper, the experience of publishing pre-war local community media in Shigeno village did not lead to the publication of the post-war public hall newsletter, and it was observed that the public hall newsletter was parallel to another local community media that draws on the flow of pre-war local community media. Finally, we considered the cases of Tsuoka and Shigeno, and pointed out that the pre-war local community media publishing was connected to the post-war local community media publishing while being linked to the acceptance and practice of post-war social education (out-of-school education) and public hall policies in the local community

    From periphery to partnership: a critical analysis of the relationship of baptists in Hong Kong with the colonial government in the post-World War II era

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    Baptists in Hong Kong, originally a peripheral denomination before the World War II, had become the largest Protestant community by the time of the handover of the colony to China in July 1997. This study aims to narrate and explicate the formation of the church-state practice of Baptists in Hong Kong in the period of 1949 to 1984. The thesis is focused on the question of the extent to which the British colonial policy contributed to the rise of the Baptist community in Hong Kong. The thesis will uncover the roots of the British colonial strategy in the post-World War II era and how the Baptist denomination happened to be part of the scheme. The thesis will also attempt to account for the formation of the Baptist church-state practice. The thesis finally will employ John Howard Yoder's criticism of Constantinianism to critique the Baptist church-state practice in the post-World War II period, and the core concepts of Yoder's Jeremianic model will serve as an alternative of the Baptist church-state practice in the post-colonial era.The study will be based upon a theological and empirical research. The socio-political- ecclesiological context of Hong Kong in the post-World War II period and the British colonial policy in the territory will be scrutinised. The uniqueness of Baptist polity that has led to the emergence of the Baptist lay-leaders and the interactions between the laity and the pastors on the issue of Baptist educational institutions accepting the government subsidy, embodying the formalisation of the church-state practice, will be examined. The rationale behind the Baptist leaders' willingness to become a partner with the government will be explored, by investigating the patron-client relationship between the colonial government and Baptists and kuan-hsi (network), a prominent feature of the Chinese cultural heritage.The practice of Baptist worship service will be investigated as it is regarded as the principal factor of the formation of spirituality. I will suggest that pietistic individualism focusing on personal religious and spiritual experience contributes to a problematic church-world dichotomy in the minds of Chinese Christians. A review of Chinese theology in the first half of the twentieth century will disclose a solid heritage of pietism among Chinese Christians. The factor of "state control of religion" in Chinese culture fosters and enhances their uncritical attitude toward government. Additionally, order and contents of Baptist worship service have also been shaped by the pietistic tradition so that sermons in worship mainly focus on such topics as personal relationship with God as deepened through Bible reading, prayers, fellowship, sin, etcThe existing models explicating Hong Kong's church-state situation offered by Hong Kong local scholars will be analysed. A literature review of the discourse on church-world relations by the post-World War II theologians in the West, including Oliver O'Donovan, Stanley Hauerwas, and John Howard Yoder, will be introduced. Yoder's model will be considered as a better one among them, and its strengths as well as its applicability will be examined. "Effectiveness" and "faithfulness," two key features of Yoder's Jeremianic model, will be singled out as the main criteria to expound the church-state practice of Baptists in Hong Kong. The thesis will also explore the question of the extent to which the church-state model adopted by Baptists in Hong Kong relied on a Constantinian model which in the post-colonial era is now shown to be problematic, and the suggested solutions to the dilemma of Baptists will be offered. The practice of "the church as a worshipping community" will lead Baptists to a faithful church-state practice in the post-colonial era. The thesis will conclude with an examination of the Jeremianic model of church-state relations in dialogue with Yoder's political theology. At the end of the thesis, it will be pointed out that the Home Church in China after 1949 has been the most rapid-growing group within the Christian community despite acute persecutions by the Communist government. This example will serve as a model of church-state practice for Baptists in the present day Hong Kong -the city that has taken on a new configuration with increasing strong presence of Mainland China's political and ideological influence

    From fear to collaboration : community peacebuilding in the context of a victor’s peace in Sri Lanka

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    This thesis focuses on the relatively under-research disciplinary area of community based peacebuilding in the context of victor’s peace in Sri Lanka following the state’s civil war with the Tamil Tigers. These events led to several challenges for liberal peacebuilding, including persistent militarisation, and indeed a decade after the end of the civil war, most of these socioeconomic, and political challenges remain unresolved due to the high level of militarisation. In such circumstances, community peacebuilding efforts appear to be particularly challenging. It has thus been suggested that the area of community peacebuilding requires more research and the inclusion of more elements that integrate local knowledge and cultural practices. This study provides a contextual understanding of contemporary community peacebuilding practices within a context of victor’s peace in Sri Lanka, especially the post-war challenges facing minority communities. The prevailing practice in community development in the Asia Pacific leans towards a top-down approach, despite community development being driven bottom up. There is a need for a new approach to community development. This study adopts an interdisciplinary approach to examine the interplay between community development and peacebuilding. Considering the importance of local peace, Lederach’s peacebuilding pyramid is used as the theoretical approach for this study. that it is imperative that peacebuilding is developed from the periphery of communities with the support of non-profit and grassroots organisations. Findings from four selected case study towns of Negombo, Killinochchi, Mullaitivu and Kurunagala indicate that encouraging local participation and incorporating local knowledge into their activities enhances inter-ethnic relations. Through these projects, a safe space was provided for self-expression and dialogue, which played a crucial role in the process of post-war community peacebuilding. Thus, community leaders took charge of reducing tensions between communities by promoting social solidarity. These micro solidarities within communities foster non-violent coexistence in divided societies. This study contributes significantly to the literature on post-war peacebuilding and community development through its detailed study of victor’s peace in Sri Lanka, which offers an insight into aspects of community peacebuilding. Key argument of the study is that top-down approach of victor’s peace hinders the ability of voluntary sector and the communities for peace. This study posits that voluntary sector in conjunction with community leaders strengthen capacities and raise awareness within communities on social, political, and economic contradictions causing for their oppression

    Historicizing Citizenship in Post-War Britain

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    Citizenship has been widely debated in post-war British history, yet historians discuss the concept in very different, and potentially contradictory, ways. In doing so, historians are largely following in the footsteps of post-war politicians, thinkers, and ordinary people, who showed that citizenship could – and did – mean very different things. The alternative ways of framing the concept can be usefully described as the three registers of citizenship. First, there are the political and legal definitions of what makes any individual a citizen. Secondly, there is the notion of belonging to a national community, an understanding of citizenship which highlights that legal status alone cannot guarantee an individual's ability to practise citizenship rights. Thirdly, there is the idea of citizenship as divided between ‘good’ or ‘active’ citizens, and ‘bad’ or ‘passive’ ones, a differential understanding of citizenship which has proved very influential in debates about British society. This article reviews these registers, and concludes by arguing that all three must be taken into account if we are to comprehend properly the nature and citizenship as both status and practice in post-war Britain

    Does Identification with the LGBTQ Community Impact Reintegration Experiences? Female Service Members\u27 Perspectives

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    The purpose of this research was to examine the reintegration experiences of female service members who deployed in a Post 9/11 war and identify with the LGBTQ community. The study employed a mixed methods survey to gather information from two female service members regarding their identification with the LGBTQ community before, during, and after deployment as well as their challenges and supports post deployment. Reponses from the survey were analyzed and coded to develop themes. The themes that emerged included pre-coming out, coming out, and post coming out. These theme outlined how the coming out process aligned with the deployment experiences of participants. Participants consistently identified frequent challenges during reintegration in balancing multiple roles, relationships, and mental health as well as receiving support from military leadership, peers, and military and civilian organizations. Future research is needed to better understand this unique population and provide direction for policy and social work practice

    Does Identification with the LGBTQ Community Impact Reintegration Experiences? Female Service Members’ Perspectives

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    The purpose of this research was to examine the reintegration experiences of female service members who deployed in a Post 9/11 war and identify with the LGBTQ community. The study employed a mixed methods survey to gather information from two female service members regarding their identification with the LGBTQ community before, during, and after deployment as well as their challenges and supports post deployment. Reponses from the survey were analyzed and coded to develop themes. The themes that emerged included pre-coming out, coming out, and post coming out. These theme outlined how the coming out process aligned with the deployment experiences of participants. Participants consistently identified frequent challenges during reintegration in balancing multiple roles, relationships, and mental health as well as receiving support from military leadership, peers, and military and civilian organizations. Future research is needed to better understand this unique population and provide direction for policy and social work practice

    Does Identification with the LGBTQ Community Impact Reintegration Experiences? Female Service Members\u27 Perspectives

    Get PDF
    The purpose of this research was to examine the reintegration experiences of female service members who deployed in a Post 9/11 war and identify with the LGBTQ community. The study employed a mixed methods survey to gather information from two female service members regarding their identification with the LGBTQ community before, during, and after deployment as well as their challenges and supports post deployment. Reponses from the survey were analyzed and coded to develop themes. The themes that emerged included pre-coming out, coming out, and post coming out. These theme outlined how the coming out process aligned with the deployment experiences of participants. Participants consistently identified frequent challenges during reintegration in balancing multiple roles, relationships, and mental health as well as receiving support from military leadership, peers, and military and civilian organizations. Future research is needed to better understand this unique population and provide direction for policy and social work practice

    What’s Writing Got to Do with It?: Citizen Wisdom, Civil Rights Activism, and 21st Century Community Literacy

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    This article examines what a pedagogy of public rhetoric and community literacy might look like based on an understanding of twentieth century Mexican American civil rights rhetoric. The inductive process of examining archival materials and conducting oral histories informs this discussion on the processes and challenges of gaining civic inclusion. I argue that writing can be both a healing process and an occasion for exercising agency in a world of contingency and uncertainty. To illustrate, I describe several key events shaping the evolution of the post-World War II Mexican American civil rights movement in New Mexico. Taking a case study approach, I begin this chapter by examining the civic discourses of one prominent New Mexico leader in the post-World War II civil rights movement: Vicente Ximenes. As a leader, Ximenes confronted critical civil rights issues about culture and belonging for over fifty years beginning in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is a historical moment worth revisiting. First, I set the stage for this examination about writing, citizenship, and civic literacy by analyzing two critical rhetorical moments in the life of this post World War II civil rights activist. Secondly, I connect the Ximenes legacy to a growing movement at the University of New Mexico and the ways that we are making critical responses to current issues facing our local communities in New Mexico. By triangulating social acts of literacy, currently and historically, this article offers organizing principles for Composition teachers and advocates of community literacy serving vulnerable communities in their various spheres of practice
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