2,116,237 research outputs found

    Symposium: Fascism in American Colleges

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    Flyer for political symposium on October 20, 1934 with participants: Samuel Friedman, Larry Cohen, Joseph J. Lash, and Theodore Draper. Student Publications: The Campus Newspaper Collectio

    Global Health Initiatives (GHIs) : institutional innovation and the challenge to development evaluation

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    This paper explores how GHIs as a form of institutional innovation are challenging the practice of development evaluation. It begins with a discussion of GHIs and criticisms or questions they have faced on accountability, sustainability and systems impact. It then outlines the short history of development evaluation and discusses how GHIs are pushing its practice towards a broader application of evaluation, performance evaluation. The paper discusses some of the strategic and political applications of evaluation and looks at systems impact, particularly vertical interventions and health systems strengthening, to illustrate the conceptual challenges that GHIs’ interventions can raise with respect to evaluation and how evaluation practice lags behind GHIs’ innovation. Finally, the paper looks at the Global Fund’s Five-Year Evaluation as an example of performance evaluation and how this evaluation addressed or failed to address external commentaries on its accountability,sustainability and systems impact. The paper concludes with some observations about the relationship between institutional innovation and performance evaluation

    Aesthetics relation between art, culture, politics: social turn

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    Рукопись поступила в редакцию 1 июня 2016 г.This article deals with the problem of important social turn in the relationship between politics and art in the contemporary situation. In the postmodern sense, the relation between politics and art is assumed as performance or, in other words, as the representation of art and politics in the realm of cultural discourses and figures. The relations between art and politics in the contemporary sense may be assumed in terms of this triple definition, as: the transfer of politics into art, as the spectacularization of politics through art, and as a potential field of intervening critical, subversive practices in the global-transitional social processes of performing forms of life in the realm of expansive neoliberal capitalism and its global crisis

    Sports mega-events – three sites of contemporary political contestation

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    This article discusses the contemporary politics of sports mega-events, involving the Olympic Games and Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Men’s Football World Cup Finals as well as other lower ‘order’ sports megas, taking two main forms: the promotional and the protest. There is a politics in, and a politics of, sports mega-events. The former focuses on the internal politics of the organizing bodies, such as the International Olympic Committee and FIFA. This form of politics has been written about elsewhere, and hence, there is no detailed discussion in this article about it. Instead this article offers a brief discussion of the range and number of sports mega-events since 2000, an assessment of the contemporary politics of sports mega-events, a focus on three main sites of political contestation – rights, legacy and labour, and finally, it offers conclusions about research into the politics of sports mega-events

    The suburban question: grassroots politics and place making in Spanish suburbs

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    Manuel Castells spoke of the urban as a unit of collective consumption, yet much of the politics of collective consumption he documented was evident in the suburbs. The tendency for suburbs of most complexions to lack services and amenities has been and continues to be a focus of politics in Europe. In Spain, as elsewhere in Europe, a grassroots politics surrounding the making good of these deficits in basic services and amenities has broadened and formalised somewhat to become part of a competitive local representative politics concerned with shaping a sense of place. Here we consider this legacy of grassroots politics as it has played out more recently in a politics of place making in Getafe and Badalona in metropolitan Madrid and Barcelona, respectively. In conclusion, we suggest that this enduring suburban question—of making the suburban urban—places them at the centre of contemporary metropolitan governance and politics. However, it also raises further issues for study—notably, the scalar politics in which suburban place making is empowered or constrained, the role of political parties and individual politicians on the place-making process, and the point at which grassroots politics of collective consumption becomes urban entrepreneurialism

    The past is evil/evil is past: on retrospective politics, 'philosophy of history, and temporal manichaeism

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    One of the most remarkable phenomena in current international politics is the increasing attention paid to historical injustice. Opinions on this phenomenon strongly differ. For some it stands for a new and noble type of politics based on raised moral standards and helping the cause of peace and democracy. Others are more critical and claim that retrospective politics comes at the cost of present- or future-oriented politics and tends to be anti-utopian. The warnings about the perils of a retrospective politics outweighing politics directed at contemporary injustices, or strivings for a more just future, should be taken seriously. Yet the alternative of a politics disregarding all historical injustice is not desirable either. We should refuse to choose between restitution for historical injustices and struggle for justice in the present or the future. Rather, we should look for types of retrospective politics that do not oppose but complement or reinforce the emancipatory and utopian elements in present- and future-directed politics. I argue that retrospective politics can indeed have negative effects. Most notably it can lead to a temporal Manichaeism that not only posits that the past is evil, but also tends to treat evil as anachronistic or as belonging to the past. Yet I claim that ethical Manichaeism and anti-utopianism and are not inherent features of all retrospective politics but rather result from an underlying philosophy of history that treats the relation between past, present, and future in antinomic terms and prevents us from understanding transtemporal injustices and responsibilities. In order to pinpoint the problem of certain types of retrospective politics and point toward some alternatives, I start out from a criticism formulated by the German philosopher Odo Marquard and originally directed primarily at progressivist philosophies of history

    Dissemination of management into politics: Michael Porter and the political uses of management consulting

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    The article contributes to the literature on management dissemination by looking at how management fashions are diffused into and circulated in politics. The ideas of management have been increasingly disseminated into the realm of politics during recent decades. To illustrate how this takes place, this article examines the spread of Michael Porter’s ideas on national politics. Porter’s work is considered a management fashion that has been skilfully packaged; a new form of the 20th-century tradition of state-led social engineering which takes the form of management fashion-style packaging. For this he is seen as a global guru in national politics, and this development is regarded as a new form of consultocracy in the realm of democracies. In consultocracy, the ideas of management consulting are often adopted into politics as a common justifying rationality of power for the political elites. Thus we call for further research on the underlying dynamics of the power involved as management fashions are disseminated into the realm of politics

    Pressure politics: a politics of collective consumption?

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    The nature of a politics of collective consumption is reviewed in terms of how we can distinguish those actions that pursue a broader public interest. The argument that outsider groups may be influential in terms of setting the political agenda is explored in relation to the politics of obesity and controversies about child access for divorced fathers. Animal rights militancy has proved a difficult issue for government to handle and has wider implications for pressure group activity. Government continues to favour a close relationship with big business but is less interested in reforming trade associations. Increasing cooperation between the National Farmers Union and Farmers for Action suggests that insider groups may be more willing to cooperate with outsider groups as they become more effective. The question of whether pressure group activity is moving in the direction of an ‘uncivil society’ is considered

    False Idles: The Politics of the "Quiet Life"

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    The dominant Greek and Roman ideology held that the best human life required engaging in politics, on the grounds that the human good is shared, not private, and that the activities central to this shared good are those of traditional politics. This chapter surveys three ways in which philosophers challenged this ideology, defended a withdrawal from or transformation of traditional politics, and thus rethought what politics could be. Plato and Aristotle accept the ideology's two central commitments but insist that a few exceptional human beings could transcend the good of human activities. Epicurus argues that the human good is private, not shared. Socrates and some of his followers, including especially the Stoics, argue that the activities central to the shared human good are not those of traditional politics
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