311,069 research outputs found

    Multiple Factors Affect Job Satisfaction of Hospital RNs

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    Highlights findings from an analysis of variables associated with job satisfaction levels of registered nurses working in hospitals, including health status, race/ethnicity, career orientation, working conditions, workload, and benefits

    Psychosocial working conditions of shiftworking nurses: A long‐term latent transition analysis

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    AimThis study aimed to identify profiles of working conditions to which nurses were exposed to over time and investigate how changes in working conditions relate to shiftworking and health.BackgroundPrevious studies rarely addressed the issue of working conditions development over long periods and the effects of such development on nurses' health.MethodsData from a national cohort of nurses in Sweden (N = 2936) were analysed using a person-centred analytical approach—latent profile and latent transition analysis.ResultsNurses report better psychosocial working conditions as they progress into mid-career. Shiftworking nurses experience poorer working conditions than their dayworking counterparts and tend to move from shiftwork to daywork as they progress into mid-career. In mid-career, nurses in work environments characterized by low autonomy and support tend to report poorer health outcomes.ConclusionCurrent analyses suggest that shiftworking nurses are particularly in need of interventions that address poor work environments. Not only do they experience more negative psychosocial working conditions than their dayworking counterparts, but they do so while having to contend with demanding schedules.Implications for Nursing ManagementThe findings highlight that organisational interventions should target different aspects of the work environment for nurses in diverse stages of their careers

    Safeguarding the Public: Why Workers’ Rights Education Should Be Required Learning for Nurses

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    Nurses are integral to the delivery of quality health care in this country. They set aside their own needs and fears to provide care and other social services to people across a multitude of settings, taking on the burdens and stresses of others. However, our profit-driven health care system incentivizes employers to maximize productivity at reduced costs by asking nurses to do more with less. Nurses are expected to endure harsh working conditions, proven to be harmful to the nurses’ health and well-being, despite evidence showing that poor working conditions can lead to poor patient outcomes. There are numerous worker protection laws designed to empower nurses, as workers in this country, to advocate for better working conditions. Yet, despite the inextricable link between poor working conditions and compromised patient safety, licensing bodies do not require nurses to understand their rights in the workplace. This has resulted in a nursing workforce that is woefully unprepared to deal with the adverse working conditions that are naturally borne from our profit-driven health care system. Thus, this Article argues that, as a public health and safety measure, workers’ rights education should be required for nursing licensure

    Satisfacción con la atención de enfermería en los consumidores de drogas: evolución de una escala

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    Objectives: To identify the degree of satisfaction with nursing care, the significant variables and contribute to the evolution of the scale.Methods: Descriptive, correlational, cross study, with 180 drug users. Data collected using the scale called “Satisfaction of users with the Nursing Health Center26”, between February and December 2012 in three treatment units in the region of Lisbon and Vale do Tejo, Portugal. Results: Users indicated 83.3% satisfaction. The dimension “Information individualization” was the most marked (98.5%). The more stability in the programs, abstinence from stimulants and benzodiazepines and more nursing interventions, the greater the satisfaction. Better working conditions, specializing in mental health, younger ages and less experience of nurses also contributed to satisfaction. Four items of the scale were extracted, assuming new SUCECS22 designation. Conclusions: Satisfaction was high, influenced by structural variables of users, nurses and working conditions. The scale has proved suitable for assessment in this population.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio

    Струменеві захоплюючо-орієнтуючі пристрої

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    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n=33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n=14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health

    Haemoglobinopathies and health care provision for ethnic minorities

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    The level of training and competence in dealing with haemoglobinopathies (which mainly affect ethnic minorities in the UK) may not be totally adequate among nurses. Nurses indicated that they received little or no information in their teaching for working from a multiracial perspective and what they had learned was through experience and personal research since qualifying as nurses. Knowledge of the biological basis of inheritance, methods of acquisition of thalassaemia and sicklecell anaemia and the ethnic profile of people affected by these conditions may not be totally adequate among nurses. Many nurses wanted more training, including those who had already received instruction, since this was described as ‘far too vague’, ‘not constructive’, ‘minimal’, or ‘embarrassingly insufficient’, recommending that instruction be given by a sickle-cell anaemia/thalassaemia counsellor with a contribution from patients. A combination of poor quality, or lack, of instruction, together with time and resource pressures, is responsible for this limited understanding, resulting in insufficient awareness of the health needs of ethnic minorities leading to inequalities in healthcare provision

    Investigating the level of moral distress and its related factors among nurses in mazandaran burn center

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    Background and purpose: Moral distress is a common phenomenon in nursing professional and burn nurses are constantly faced with making different moral decisions for patients who are in terrible conditions. Therefore, nurses in burn units experience moral distress as mental tension. This study was conducted to determine the severity of moral distress and the factors associated with that in burn nurses. Materials and methods: A descriptive- analytical study was conducted using census sampling on 172 nurses working in Mazandaran burn center, 2014. Data was collected through identifying demographic and occupational characteristics of the nurses (using relevant questionnaires) and Corley’s Moral Distress Scale. Data analysis was performed applying Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The mean score for moral distress was 105.65±52.39 which indicates a moderate level experienced by nurses. Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant positive correlation between educational level and level of moral distress (P=0.011). There was no significant association between moral distress and other individual and professional characteristics (P>0.05). Conclusion: Moral distress is accompanied by many complications that have direct effects on nurses’ professional practice. Therefore, nurse managers should consider this issue and plan for programs on appropriate coping strategies. © 2015, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved

    Job Satisfaction Among the Nurses of Makueni District Hospital, Kenya

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    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the level of job satisfaction among the nurses of Makueni District Hospital. This was necessitated by the high nurse staff turnover from the facility and a myriad of complains from various departments. The study was a cross sectional descriptive survey involving about 50 nurses that was carried out between 15 and 19th July 2013. The study employed mixed method approach. Tests of significance were through use of Chi-square, Fishers exact test and logistic regression. The key results were that overall job satisfaction was low (36%). There were significant relationships between job satisfaction and cordial relationship with the nurse manager (c2 12.131 df 4 p=0.016<0.05. Logistic regression p=0.018<0.05). The plans to quit the hospital and work elsewhere indicates a relationship with job satisfaction (c2 12.749 df 4 p=0.013<0.05). The findings of this study suggest that there is no enabling working environment for the nurses and this could be a barrier to service delivery in the Hospital. These findings suggest that the Nurse Managers should build up effective relationship with the staff and other departments and should identify negative working conditions which affect staff and appropriately delegate authority to them

    Culture of Safety among Nurses in a Tertiary Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia

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    Purpose: To assess the culture of safety among nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in King Khaled University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A random sample of 492 nurses was included in the survey using a pre-validated instrument, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ).Results: Of the questionnaires given to 492 nurses, only 418 complete ones were returned, giving a response rate of 84.9 %. Most of the participants (354, 84.7 %) were staff nurses and the majority, 112 (26.8 %), had working experience of ≥ 20 years. Job satisfaction was perceived as the most common dimension of culture of safety among nurse participants (92.7 ± 14.6) followed by working conditions (82.1 ± 16.6) and safety (75.5 ± 15.5) and teamwork (75.5 ± 16.7). Stress recognition (41.9 ± 25.2) and perception of management (68.1 ± 19.1) ranked as the least common dimensions of safety culture among study subjects. A significant difference in mean score was found between males and females for both working conditions (p = 0.035) and teamwork (p = 0.045). Significant differences were also observed in terms of job satisfaction dimension scores with regard to years of work experience (p = 0.045). A significant differences was also observed in terms of stress recognition dimension scores in terms of years of work experience (p = 0.007).Conclusion: Efforts are needed from healthcare authorities to increase nurses’ perception of management and stress recognition in order to improve safety culture among nurses in Saudi Arabia.Keywords: Nurses, Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), Safety culture, Working conditions, Teamwork, Job satisfactio
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