1,822,204 research outputs found

    Politicising national identity: Welsh parties conflate 'Welshness' with their own political ideology

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    The politicisation of national identity in Wales has increased dramatically since devolution. But political parties do not present a common version of 'Welshness', writes Sophie Williams. Each party expresses their own version instead, conflating national identity with their own political ideology in the process

    On National Identity

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    In response to “Trump and the Trumpists” (Vol. 3, No. 1)

    Masculinity and National Identity on the Early American Stage

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    This essay explores how the early American stage functioned as an incubator for ideas about national identity, artistic expression, and masculinity. Reading four plays from the early years of the Republic – Royall Tyler’s The Contrast, William Dunlap’s Andre®, John Augustus Stone’s Metamora, and Robert Montgomery Bird’s The Gladiator, I demonstrate how early American drama addressed changing concepts of ideal masculinity, republican democracy, and the colonial past

    Psychological citizenship and national identity

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    In this paper, I raise the question of whether psychological citizenship (i.e. the subjective sense of being a citizen) is necessarily intertwined with a sense of national identity in our contemporary world. First, I argue that psychological citizenship is always dependent upon a sense of shared identity with the community (be it national or other), and I explore some of the reasons why this is the case. Second, I argue that such sense of shared identity can nevertheless sometimes remain implicit so that in order to assess its impact one may need to look beyond people’s explicit statements of identification. Third, I turn to the more specific question of national identity and argue that such identity presents particular characteristics that make it consonant with the notion of citizenship (and thus able to sustain a subjective sense of citizenship) in ways that other identities might not always be. Finally, I compare a psychological citizenship based on national identity to one which would be based on a ‘global’ or ‘cosmopolitan’ identity. I argue that, whilst the former constitutes a pervasive social psychological reality, doubts can be raised as to whether this is the case for the latter, and thus as to whether it can form a credible alternative to national identity as the psychological substrate of citizenship. I conclude with some reflections concerning what different approaches of social psychology can bring to the study of the psychological aspects of citizenship

    Representations of Europe and the Nation: How do Spaniards see themselves as Nationals and Europeans? Jean Monnet/Robert Schuman Paper Series, Vol. 4. No. 13, October, 2004

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    (From the introduction). The core theme of this article is the relation between citizens’ national identity and their European identity. After the European Union (EU) launched a series of policies aimed at creating a European identity at the end of the 1980s, the member states responded by including a paragraph in the Maastricht Treaty specifying that the Union should respect member states’ national identities (Article F, point 1). This reaction, along with the introduction of the principle of subsidiarity and the rejection of the word “Federal”, suggested that many member states saw the creation of a European identity as a potential threat to their own national identities and their citizens’ national loyalties. Indeed, in the early 1990s national identity was used by the political elites as a means of justifying the right to independent statehood and sovereignty. Due to the close links between national identity and national independence, many scholars have argued that the European integration process could be seen as a threat to national identity (Höjelid 2001), and hence difficult to achieve

    NATIONAL IDENTITY IN THE NIGERIAN SOCIETY

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    Sion and Elizium : national identity, religion and allegiance in Anthony Copley's 'A Fig for Fortune'

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    This article uses Anthony Copley’s poem A Fig for Fortune (1596) to examine Elizabethan constructions of national identity. Acknowledging that religious and national identities were symbiotic in the Reformation era, it argues that the interdependency of Protestant and Catholic narratives of “nationhood” must be appreciated. Analysis of Copley’s text engages with previous critiques, including those of Clare Reid, Alison Shell, and Susannah Monta, in order to propose a more coherent interpretation of Copley’s engagement with Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. Copley did not merely defend Catholics as loyal subjects; he moved beyond debates about loyalty to reconsider ideas of nation, England, and Englishness more broadly, challenging the premises as well as the conclusions of Protestant statesmen and writers
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