80,965 research outputs found

    Museums After School: How Museums Are Reaching Kids, Partnering With Schools, and Making a Difference

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    Provides observations and lessons learned by the schools and museums that participated in Irvine's four-year Museum Youth Initiative. Outlines the approach each museum adopted in developing afterschool programs

    Approaching Evaluation in Youth Community Informatics

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    In the Youth Community Informatics project, young people from disadvantaged communities use audio and video recording and editing tools, GPS/GIS, presentation software, graphics, and other digital technologies as the means for addressing community needs. They build community asset maps, document community history, develop exhibits in collaboration with libraries and museums, present cultural heritage, organize political action, operate community radio, create and maintain community technology centers, and express themselves through multiple media. These activities typically involve multiple partners and develop in unpredictable ways in response to community life. In order to understand what they mean in the lives of the youth and the community we need richer evaluation approaches.published or submitted for publicationis peer reviewe

    Programming and Researching With Youth in Cultural Institutions – a Brief Reflection on a Cross-Institutional Youth Advisory Board

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    This brief report describes the operational processes and participatory methods involved in setting up, managing and mediating a cross-institutional youth advisory board. Youth advisory boards in museums give young people opportunities to co-program with and for their peers, as well as to have an active and visible role inside institutions. Framed by the research project Youth in Museums, the youth advisory board Listening Lab – Youth, Culture, Participation, was co-organized and developed with five cultural institutions in Lisbon, Portugal. These included the Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT), BoCA – Biennal of Contemporary Art, Casa da Cerca – Contemporary Art Centre, LU.CA – Luís de Camões Theatre and the Municipal Galleries. Young people, aged 15 to 25, were invited to participate in group roundtables to discuss specific issues related to youth arts programs. In the sessions with the youth advisory board I combined a semi-structured approach with participatory methods that activated collective processes of meaning making.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio

    TRAVEL, TOURISM AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE CHILDREN\u27S MUSEUM OF SOUTH CAROLINA

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    Generally, museums are an integral part of the fabric of any prosperous society. Specifically, children\u27s museums serve to educate and entertain the youth and the young at heart. The Children\u27s Museum of South Carolina allows visitors of all ages to touch, explore, play, and learn. According to the Association of Children\u27s Museums (2013), the total economic activity of its children\u27s museum members was 449million.Thispaperassesseddirect,indirect,andinducedeconomicimpactstodetermineanassociatedtotaleconomicimpactthatexceeds449 million. This paper assessed direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts to determine an associated total economic impact that exceeds 4 million for the Children\u27s Museum of South Carolina

    Staying Gold: How a group of university students created intergenerational connections through art museum programming and community collaboration

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    In this article, we examine ways in which an intergenerational art program, Stay Gold, helped build relationships between queer youth and elders in an art museum to combat loneliness, isolation, and disconnection. This museum program was initially designed by university students in a graduate art education course to help form connections between queer youth and elders through art-making, sharing stories, and conversations about art. Participants play a large role in shaping the direction of the program, and the program continues to grow and evolve to include more opportunities for collaboration between youth and elders through group projects and dialogue. Although this is not a formal study with IRB approval, the participants mentioned here are all over the age of 18 and gave written permission to use their words and art in the article

    International collaboration between ecomuseums and community museums : the experience of the EU-LAC museums bi-regional youth exchange in fostering identity, building community sustainability and resilience

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    Funding: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 693669. For further information, please visit: https://www.eulacmuseums.net/.This chapter reflects on the transformative possibilities for young people, their communities and museums through international exchange between ecomuseums and community museums in Scotland, Costa Rica and Portugal. It focuses on a case study that took place in Ecomuseum Druim Nan Linntean (Ridge of Ages) as part of the 2016–18 Europe-Latin America and Caribbean Museums (EU-LAC Museums) Bi-Regional Youth Exchange, reflecting on the role of the international exchange in transforming the lives and ambitions of the young people. We also discuss the project’s engagement in issues of sustainability and climate change resilience in Scotland and Costa Rica and review its impact on the community and the leaders involved.Publisher PDFPeer reviewe

    Foundation Funding for Arts Education: An Update on Foundation Trends

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    To document the size and scope of arts education grantmaking by US foundations, Foundation Center and Grantmakers in the Arts collaborated on a 2005 report. The report examined foundation grantmaking for arts education between 1999 and 2003 and represented the most comprehensive analysis of foundation arts education support available. This new report updates the analysis of foundation arts education funding through 2012 and illustrates how support for arts education has evolved during a period of pronounced economic volatility and dramatic political and technological change

    Demographic Transformation and the Future of Museums

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    In 2009 the Center for the Future of Museums commissioned Betty Farrell to produce a report to explore in more detail the demographic trends in American society and their implications for museums. The report identifies, synthesizes, and interprets existing research on demographics, cultural consumer attitudes, museum diversity practices, and related topics. It is meant to help the museum field explore the future of museums in a "majority minority" society. Topics of inquiry include national demographic projections for the next 25 years with a focus on the shifting racial and ethnic composition of the United States; current patterns of museum attendance (and cultural participation more generally) by race, ethnicity, cultural origin and other relevant factors; culturally/ethnically specific attitudes towards museums, including perceptual and behavioral barriers to museum attendance; ways that museums currently reach out to diverse audiences; specific models and best practices; and larger trends in societal attitudes towards racial and other classifications

    Coming Up Taller

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    Coming Up Taller is a report filled with hope, a narrative about youth learning to paint, sing, write plays and poems, take photographs, make videos and play drums or violins. Here are stories of children who learn to dance, mount exhibitions, explore the history of their neighborhoods and write and print their own books. This report documents arts and humanities programs in communities across America that offer opportunities for children and youth to learn new skills, expand their horizons and develop a sense of self, well-being and belonging. Coming Up Taller is also an account of the men and women who share their skills as they help to shape the talents of children and youth and tap their hidden potentials. These dedicated individuals, often working long hours for little pay, are educators, social workers, playwrights, actors, poets, videographers, museum curators, dancers, musicians, muralists, scholars and librarians. The President's Committee believes strongly in the importance of including the arts and the disciplines of the humanities in the school curriculum. This study looks at what happens to young people when they are not in school and when they need adult supervision, safe places to go and activities that expand their skills and offer them hope. The individual programs described in this study take place in many locations, some unusual, in their communities. Children, artists and scholars come together at cultural centers, museums, libraries, performing arts centers and arts schools, to be sure. Arts and humanities programs also are based at public radio and television stations, parks and recreation centers, churches, public housing complexes, teen centers, settlement houses and Boys and Girls Clubs. In places unnoticed by mainstream media, acts of commitment and achievement are evident every da
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