124 research outputs found

    Additional file 3 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 3. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratioas a predictor of co-infection in steroid and non-steroid user

    Additional file 4 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 4. Details of respiratory secondary infection

    Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Abstract Background Although cases of respiratory bacterial infections associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have often been reported, their impact on the clinical course remains unclear. Herein, we evaluated and analyzed the complication rates of bacterial infections, causative organisms, patient backgrounds, and clinical outcome in Japanese patients with COVID-19. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study that included inpatients with COVID-19 from multiple centers participating in the Japan COVID-19 Taskforce (April 2020 to May 2021) and obtained demographic, epidemiological, and microbiological results and the clinical course and analyzed the cases of COVID-19 complicated by respiratory bacterial infections. Results Of the 1,863 patients with COVID-19 included in the analysis, 140 (7.5%) had respiratory bacterial infections. Community-acquired co-infection at COVID-19 diagnosis was uncommon (55/1,863, 3.0%) and was mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Hospital-acquired bacterial secondary infections, mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were diagnosed in 86 patients (4.6%). Severity-associated comorbidities were frequently observed in hospital-acquired secondary infection cases, including hypertension, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. The study results suggest that the neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (> 5.28) may be useful in diagnosing complications of respiratory bacterial infections. COVID-19 patients with community-acquired or hospital-acquired secondary infections had significantly increased mortality. Conclusions Respiratory bacterial co-infections and secondary infections are uncommon in patients with COVID-19 but may worsen outcomes. Assessment of bacterial complications is important in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, and the study findings are meaningful for the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents and management strategies

    Additional file 8 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 8. Proportion of thrombosis and myocardial injury in bacterial respiratory co-infection and secondary infection with coronavirus disease 2019

    Safety and feasibility of opening window fistulotomy as a new precutting technique for primary biliary access in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

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    Background/Aims Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common and serious complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. To prevent this event, a unique precutting method, termed opening window fistulotomy, was performed in patients with a large infundibulum as the primary procedure for biliary cannulation, whereby a suprapapillary laid-down H-shaped incision was made without touching the orifice. This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of this novel technique. Methods One hundred and ten patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients with a papillary roof size ≥10 mm underwent opening window fistulotomy for primary biliary access. In addition, the incidence of complications and success rate of biliary cannulation were evaluated. Results The median size of the papillary roof was 6 mm (range, 3–20 mm). Opening window fistulotomy was performed in 30 patients (27.3%), none of whom displayed PEP. Duodenal perforation was recorded in one patient (3.3%), which was resolved by conservative treatment. The cannulation rate was high (96.7%, 29/30 patients). The median duration of biliary access was 8 minutes (range, 3–15 minutes). Conclusions Opening window fistulotomy demonstrated its feasibility for primary biliary access by achieving great safety with no PEP complications and a high success rate for biliary cannulation

    Clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition for comprehensive genomic profiling of pancreatic cancer

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    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue acquisition (EUS-TA) is essential for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The feasibility of comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) using samples obtained by EUS-TA has been under recent discussion. This study aimed to evaluate the utility of EUS-TA for CGP in a clinical setting. Methods CGP was attempted in 178 samples obtained from 151 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer at the Aichi Cancer Center between October 2019 and September 2021. We evaluated the adequacy of the samples for CGP and determined the factors associated with the adequacy of the samples obtained by EUS-TA retrospectively. Results The overall adequacy for CGP was 65.2% (116/178), which was significantly different among the four sampling methods (EUS-TA vs. surgical specimen vs. percutaneous biopsy vs. duodenal biopsy, 56.0% [61/109] vs. 80.4% [41/51] vs. 76.5% [13/17] vs. 100.0% [1/1], respectively; p=0.022). In a univariate analysis, needle gauge/type was associated with adequacy (22 G fine-needle aspiration vs. 22 G fine-needle biopsy [FNB] vs. 19 G-FNB, 33.3% (5/15) vs. 53.5% (23/43) vs. 72.5% (29/40); p=0.022). The sample adequacy of 19 G-FNB for CGP was 72.5% (29/40), and there was no significant difference between 19 G-FNB and surgical specimens (p=0.375). Conclusions To obtain adequate samples for CGP with EUS-TA, 19 G-FNB was shown to be the best in clinical practice. However, 19 G-FNB was not still sufficient, so further efforts are required to improve adequacy for CGP

    Use of the index of pulmonary vascular disease for predicting long-term outcome of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

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    AimsLimited data exist on risk factors for the long-term outcome of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease (CHD-PAH). We focused on the index of pulmonary vascular disease (IPVD), an assessment system for pulmonary artery pathology specimens. The IPVD classifies pulmonary vascular lesions into four categories based on severity: (1) no intimal thickening, (2) cellular thickening of the intima, (3) fibrous thickening of the intima, and (4) destruction of the tunica media, with the overall grade expressed as an additive mean of these scores. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between IPVD and the long-term outcome of CHD-PAH.MethodsThis retrospective study examined lung pathology images of 764 patients with CHD-PAH aged <20 years whose lung specimens were submitted to the Japanese Research Institute of Pulmonary Vasculature for pulmonary pathological review between 2001 and 2020. Clinical information was collected retrospectively by each attending physician. The primary endpoint was cardiovascular death.ResultsThe 5-year, 10-year, 15-year, and 20-year cardiovascular death-free survival rates for all patients were 92.0%, 90.4%, 87.3%, and 86.1%, respectively. The group with an IPVD of ≥2.0 had significantly poorer survival than the group with an IPVD <2.0 (P = .037). The Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for the presence of congenital anomaly syndromes associated with pulmonary hypertension, and age at lung biopsy showed similar results (hazard ratio 4.46; 95% confidence interval: 1.45–13.73; P = .009).ConclusionsThe IPVD scoring system is useful for predicting the long-term outcome of CHD-PAH. For patients with an IPVD of ≥2.0, treatment strategies, including choosing palliative procedures such as pulmonary artery banding to restrict pulmonary blood flow and postponement of intracardiac repair, should be more carefully considered

    Additional file 1 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 1. Identification of organisms in ventilator-associated pneumoniacase

    Additional file 6 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 6. Admission to intensive care unitand use of invasive mechanical ventilationof bacterial respiratory infection with coronavirus disease 2019

    Additional file 2 of Impact of respiratory bacterial infections on mortality in Japanese patients with COVID-19: a retrospective cohort study

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    Additional file 2. Evaluation of white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin on admission as predictors of respiratory bacterial co-infection based on the area under the curv
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