1,744 research outputs found

    Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula

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    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals

    Differential T-cell and monocyte responses in hepatocellular carcinoma treated with regorafenib plus nivolumab: an integrated clinical and biomarker analysis of the phase 2 RENOBATE trial

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    Regorafenib plus nivolumab (RegoNivo) combination has shown promising anti-cancer activity in multiple cancer types. REBNOBATE trial is a single-arm multicenter phase 2 trial of first-line RegoNivo in patients (pts) with uHCC (NCT04310709). Here we report the clinical outcomes of the RENOBATE study and integrative biomarker analysis using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) analysis

    Table_4_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.XLSX

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    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p

    Fasting glucose variability and risk of dementia in Parkinson’s disease: a 9-year longitudinal follow-up study of a nationwide cohort

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    BackgroundDiabetes is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD); however, it is unknown whether this association is dependent on continuous hyperglycemia, hypoglycemic events, or glycemic variability. We aimed to investigate the relationship between visit-to-visit fasting glucose variability and PDD development in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD).MethodsUsing data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service, we examined 9,264 patients aged ≥40 years with de novo Parkinson’s disease (PD) who underwent ≥3 health examinations and were followed up until December 2019. Glucose variability was measured using the coefficient of variation, variability independent of the mean, and average real variability. Fine and Gray competing regression analysis was performed to determine the effect of glucose variability on incident PDD.ResultsDuring the 9.5-year follow-up period, 1,757 of 9,264 (19.0%) patients developed PDD. Patients with a higher visit-to-visit glucose variability had a higher risk of future PDD. In the multivariable adjusted model, patients with PD in the highest quartile (subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR] = 1.50, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.88), quartile 3 (SHR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62), and quartile 2 (SHR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.63) were independently associated with a higher risk of PDD than those in the lowest quartile.ConclusionWe highlighted the effect of long-term glucose variability on the development of PDD in patients with PD. Furthermore, our findings suggest that preventive measures for constant glucose control may be necessary to prevent PDD

    Table_3_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.XLSX

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    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p

    Image_1_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.PNG

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    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p

    Image_2_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.PNG

    No full text
    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p

    Table_2_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.XLSX

    No full text
    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p

    Table_1_Characterization of exosomal microRNAs in preterm infants fed with breast milk and infant formula.XLSX

    No full text
    Breastfeeding not only reduces infection-related morbidity, but also increases growth of preterm infants. Advantages of breast milk (BM) for preterm infants are significant. They continue to be studied. However, because not all preterm infants can receive breastfeeding, bovine-based infant formula (IF) is used as an alternative, which may increase the risk of several preterm complications. Exosomes isolated from biofluids are emerging as biomarkers in research of various diseases. Here, we characterized miRNA contents of exosomes in urine and serum samples of preterm infants who were BM and IF fed and performed transcriptomic analysis of small RNA libraries. We identified significantly up-regulated 6 miRNAs and 10 miRNAs, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis revealed that target genes of these miRNAs might participate in neuronal development, immunity modulation, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and transmembrane exchange. Our data suggest that exosome-based systemic screening for preterm infants with breastfeeding might be a screening tool for identifying target molecules involved in therapy for preterm infants in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and for future application as nutraceutical formulations or pharmaceuticals.</p
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