14 research outputs found

    COVID-19 orthodontic practice management guidelines version 1.0 by Malaysian Association of Orthodontists

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    Most parts of the world are seeing cases of COVID-19 outbreaks. The 2019 pandemic of novel coronavirus, SARS CoV-2, has expanded from its original centre - Wuhan, China to a growing number of countries worldwide including our nation Malaysia. Although authorities in China and some other countries have succeeded in slowing their outbreaks, the situation remains unpredictable, laced with many uncertainties. As of 5th June 2020, the WHO reports that there are over 6.7 million cases worldwide and tragically over 393,000 reported deaths. The effects of this COVID-19 are numerous and unprecedented. This global pandemic has harshly affected the day-to-day running of world. Dentistry, including orthodontic clinical practice has been brought to a screeching halt when our Malaysian government imposed the Movement Restricted Order as of 18th March 2020. As efforts to combat the viral transmission have been by and large successful in managing to “flatten the curve” of infectivity for this highly infectious virus, various guidelines have been put together to ensure resumption of clinical practice in a safe manner for much needed continuation of patient care. This particular guideline aims to provide some guidance and advice from the Malaysian Association of Orthodontists specifically tailored for orthodontic patient care within the Malaysian context during this transitional phase, until such a time when vaccine or definitive therapy is successfully developed. This approach, shall be used in addition to the existing universal cross-infection protocols available (Malaysian Dental Council Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Practice 2017 and recommendations by the Ministry of Health Malaysia) and regulations by the Government of Malaysia from time to time as we improve our knowledge and experience in dealing with this COVID-19. Orthodontic practices will need some time for acclimatisation but it is highly recommended that these become ‘new-normal’ practices in the near future with the main aim to protect all our patients, colleagues, staff and the public against the spread of this viral pandemic

    Coordination of Nanoconjugation with an Antigen/Antibody for Efficient Detection of Gynecological Tumors

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    Cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancers are common in the female reproductive system. Cervical cancer starts from the cervix, while ovarian cancer develops when abnormal cells grow in the ovary. Endometrial or uterine cancer starts from the lining of the womb in the endometrium. Approximately 12,000 women are affected every year by cervical cancer in the United States. Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) is a well-established biomarker in serum for diagnosing gynecological cancers, and its levels were observed to be elevated in cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer patients. Moreover, SCC-Ag was used to identify the tumor size and progression stages. Various biosensing systems have been proposed to identify SCC-Ag; herein, enhanced interdigitated electrode sensing is presented with the use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to conjugate an antigen/antibody. It was proved that the limit of detection is 62.5 fM in the case of antibody-GNP, which is 2-fold higher than that by SCC-Ag-GNP. Furthermore, the antibody-GNP-modified surface displays greater current increases with concomitant dose-dependent SCC-Ag levels. High analytical performance was shown by the discrimination against α-fetoprotein and CYFRA 21-1 at 1 pM. An enhanced sensing system is established for gynecological tumors, representing an advance from the earlier detection methods

    Response to the Letter

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    [No abstract available

    Mini-implant supported canine retraction with micro-osteoperforation: A split-mouth randomized clinical trial

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    Objectives: To investigate, using a split-mouth randomized clinical design, the effect of micro-osteoperforation (MOP) on mini-implant supported canine retraction using fixed appliances. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects (seven males and 23 females) with a mean age of 22.2 (3.72) years were randomized into three canine retraction groups: Group 1 (MOP 4-weekly maxilla/ 8-weekly mandible; n = 10); Group 2 (MOP 8-weekly maxilla/12-weekly mandible; n = 10) and Group 3 (MOP 12-weekly maxilla/4-weekly mandible; n = 10) measured at 4-week intervals over 16 weeks. Subjects also completed pain (5-point Likert scale) and pain impact (Visual Analogue Scale) questionnaires. The primary outcome was the amount of canine retraction over 16 weeks at MOP (experimental) and non-MOP (control) sites. Results: Mean overall canine retraction was 4.16 (1.62) mm with MOP and 3.06 (1.64) mm without. After adjusting for differences between jaws, all MOP groups exhibited significantly higher canine distalization than the control group: 0.89 mm more (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.19 to 1.59 mm; P =.01) in the MOP-4 group, 1.08 mm more (95% CI = 0.49 to 1.68 mm; P =.001) in the MOP-8 group and 1.33 mm more (95% CI = 0.55 to 2.10 mm; P =.002) in the MOP-12 group. All subjects reported pain associated with MOP with 60% classifying it as moderate and 15% severe. The main impact of this reported pain was related to chewing and speech. Conclusions: MOP can increase overall mini-implant supported canine retraction over a 16-week period of observation but this difference is unlikely to be clinically significant. © 2019 by The EH Angle Education and Research Foundation, Inc

    The spatial relationship and distances of posterior root apices to various anatomical structures

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    Objective: This study aimed to determine the spatial relationship and distances of the apices of posterior teeth to the maxillary sinus and mandibular canal/mental foramen. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two digital orthopantomograms were included, and exported to Adobe® Photoshop® CS3 version 10.0. The length of the crown and root of all posterior teeth were measured. Their roots were identified as being located 'away', 'in contact' or 'appear to project into' the sinus or mandibular canal/mental foramen. The bony distances between the apices of all posterior teeth and these anatomy structures were measured. All posterior teeth were present except for 18 missing maxillary third molars (R = 8, L = 10) and mandibular third molars (R = 9, L = 9) each. Results: There were 75.2% apices that appeared 'in contact' or 'projected into' the sinus, and this involved mainly the second premolar and all molars. In cases with measureable bony distances, the average distances (in mm) in away from the maxillary sinus were 5.61 at first premolar, 2.70 at second premolar, 1.66 at first molar, 2.29 at second molar and 3.28 at third molar. The average distance (in mm) away from the neurovascular structure in the mandible were 5.49 at first premolar, 5.00 at second premolar, 4.50 at first molar, 2.58 at second molar and 1.31 at third molar. Ten second molar apices (20.8%) and 31 apices (64.6%) of the third molar appeared to be 'in contact' with the mandibular canal. The mandibular premolars did not appear to be 'in contact' with the anterior loop or mental foramen. Conclusion: There appeared to be a closer proximity of the posterior teeth to the maxillary sinus than the mandibular canal/ mental foramen

    Anthropometric Study of Three-Dimensional Facial Morphology in Malay Adults

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    <div><p>Objectives</p><p>To establish the three-dimensional (3D) facial soft tissue morphology of adult Malaysian subjects of the Malay ethnic group; and to determine the morphological differences between the genders, using a non-invasive stereo-photogrammetry 3D camera.</p><p>Material and Methods</p><p>One hundred and nine subjects participated in this research, 54 Malay men and 55 Malay women, aged 20–30 years old with healthy BMI and with no adverse skeletal deviation. Twenty-three facial landmarks were identified on 3D facial images captured using a VECTRA M5-360 Head System (Canfield Scientific Inc, USA). Two angular, 3 ratio and 17 linear measurements were identified using Canfield Mirror imaging software. Intra- and inter-examiner reliability tests were carried out using 10 randomly selected images, analyzed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was carried out to investigate morphologic differences between genders.</p><p>Results</p><p>ICC scores were generally good for both intra-examiner (range 0.827–0.987) and inter-examiner reliability (range 0.700–0.983) tests. Generally, all facial measurements were larger in men than women, except the facial profile angle which was larger in women. Clinically significant gender dimorphisms existed in biocular width, nose height, nasal bridge length, face height and lower face height values (mean difference > 3mm). Clinical significance was set at 3mm.</p><p>Conclusion</p><p>Facial soft tissue morphological values can be gathered efficiently and measured effectively from images captured by a non-invasive stereo-photogrammetry 3D camera. Adult men in Malaysia when compared to women had a wider distance between the eyes, a longer and more prominent nose and a longer face.</p></div

    The oral health of people with chronic schizophrenia: a neglected public health burden

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    Objective: People with chronic schizophrenia have high rates of physical ill-health such as heart disease. However, there has been less attention to the issue of poor oral health including dental caries (tooth decay) and periodontal (gum) disease, although both have consequences for quality of life and systemic physical health. We therefore measured tooth decay and gum disease in Malaysians with schizophrenia

    Treatment changes and effects of headgear activator with stepwise vs. maximum mandibular jumping

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    published_or_final_versionDentistryMasterMaster of Orthodontic
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