80 research outputs found

    Intersecting identities: labour and delivery nurses' experience of pregnancy and childbirth

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    L&D nurses play an integral role in the childbirth experience. With a predicted shortage of nurses and an increasing number of women experiencing complications in pregnancy, it is essential that the needs of L&D nurses are understood so they can continue to meet the growing demands of their profession. Although research pertaining to midwifery and L&D nursing is growing, studies pertaining to pregnant registered nurses working on L&D are limited. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to begin to address this gap. My primary research question was: “What is the pregnancy and birth experience of a registered nurse working on L&D?” To address this question, data were collected through individual, semistructured interviews completed via videoconferencing with nurses who worked while pregnant on L&D units. From these data, thematic analysis resulted in one overarching theme of transformation. The thematic arc of transformation captures the transitions of a pregnant nurse’s identity as she becomes pregnant, experiences her own birth story, returns to practice, and views birthing with new eyes because of her own journey. The theme of transformation is supported by three categories, with each category representing unique transitions the nurse goes through: (a) balancing act, (b) the power of the sisterhood, and (c) becoming a mother. Providing a description of an L&D nurse’s pregnancy and childbirth experience can inform how human and professional resources are allocated and implemented for L&D nurses who work while pregnant, which may increase the retention and well-being of these skilled healthcare providers

    Positive deviant teachers: how beliefs, relational dynamics with students, and administrator leadership style impact their success with disengaged students

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    Teachers of chronically disengaged students are at risk for burnout and attrition. This qualitative study used a systemic, ecological lens to investigate how highly skilled secondary teachers built relationships with disengaged students. Data were collected through observations of four teachers and semi-structured interviews with 12 teachers, five administrators, and seven adults whose lives were impacted by a teacher. At the core of their success were two beliefs: (1) the purpose of education was to support the human development of students, and (2) authenticity was key to their success. Additional findings highlighted parallel beliefs of administrators who supported teacher success and increased their job satisfaction. Teacher education needs to shift its focus from teaching strategies to a more in-depth development of the teacher’s philosophy and being to enhance how they use themselves in building relationships with disengaged students

    Exploring women's experiences and gender relations in rock climbing: a participatory action research photovoice study

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    Success in rock climbing relies on a combination of athletic skills and traits often hegemonically defined as feminine (grace, balance, petite) and masculine (strength, endurance, muscular). Because climbing requires this balance of traits and skills, there are few differences found in the physical and psychological capabilities of female and male rock climbers. Despite this, individuals who identify as women often experience gender discrimination and feel they are treated differently than male peers in rock climbing communities—showing that gender relations in rock climbing are impaired by societal gender stereotypes and sports ideology rather than actual differences in climbing ability. Using photovoice methods, five women were provided with a medium to capture their experiences regarding gender relations in rock climbing. The research aims to inform rock climbing associations and influence future organizational programs to increase women’s climbing participation and enhance women’s experiences in the climbing community

    Pelvic health fitness and education: a six-week fitness program for incontinence knowledge and prevention

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    Urinary incontinence (UI) is associated with devastating consequences and is highly prevalent in women. Conservative measures can effectively prevent and treat UI, although women have little knowledge about these treatments. Practice guidelines for the treatment of UI advocate for the increased education of women on UI and its treatments as well as promoting conservative efforts in community settings. Nurse-led educational efforts are effective and costeffective methods of addressing UI. Nurses are in an excellent position to provide UI education in community settings. Advancing pelvic health nursing in the community will increase access to care and promote the prevention and treatment of UI. This program combines pelvic health education and fitness to be administered in community fitness facilities. The curriculum is designed to increase women’s knowledge about urinary incontinence and its treatments, increase self-efficacy to manage urinary incontinence and decrease the stigma associated with it. This program has been guided by Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy to increase women’s capacity to self-manage their pelvic health. The program was adapted due to fitness instructor staffing shortages and the education portion of the program was implemented on its own as a pelvic health seminar for women. Evaluation of the program was completed using a paper or online survey before, immediately after, and at one-month after the seminar. There was a statistically significant increase in women’s knowledge of pelvic health and a decrease in stigma associated with UI immediately after the program. This was maintained at the one-month evaluation. Verbal feedback from participants was overwhelmingly positive showing women appreciated having the ability to access health education of this nature in more community settings where they can bypass needing to see their physician or a specialist practitioner. This program fills a noted gap in the literature advancing nursing practice in pelvic health. It also answers the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s (NICE) call to action to increase UI education for women provided in community settings. Having nurses provide increased education and access to care is vital to maintaining efficiency in our healthcare system and will relieve long waitlists for specialty practitioners

    Accessing cervical cancer screening in Nigeria: exploring the experiences of Nigerian-born immigrant women in Canada

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    This research study explored the experiences of women eligible for cervical cancer screening (CCS) in accessing CCS services in Nigeria. The goal was to develop an in-depth understanding of these experiences in order to provide facts that could inform policies and interventions that will improve the utilization of CCS services among Nigerian women. This descriptive study utilized naturalistic inquiry and an intersectionality theoretical lens for understanding women’s access to CCS and its possible intersection with socially constructed categories, which could have influenced these women’s experiences. Ten (10) Nigerian-Immigrant women who met the set eligibility criteria were recruited for interviews using purposive sampling and snowballing. Data was analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis approach. The study’s findings detail overarching themes that best capture the experiences of participants with accessing CCS programs in Nigeria. Future research is needed to engender best practices for the planning of CCS programs

    Preparation before the operation: pre-assessment clinic continuing education course for rural perioperative nurses

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    The project, Preparation Before the Operation, was designed to assess the feasibility of a rural tailored online continuing education course to address the gaps in perioperative education. The 4-week asynchronous course focused on supporting nursing education in rural preoperative settings across the south zone of Alberta. Knowles and Duchscher’s theoretical frameworks guided course content on adult learning principles. The ADDIE model for online course design underpinned the delivery methodology and course strategies. The project outcome reinforced online continuing education as an effective strategy to enhance nursing knowledge and skills in remote practice settings. This project is relevant to nursing practice as it demonstrated that investing in continuing education can have a positive impact on surgical outcomes and rural surgical environments. Because perioperative nursing requires extensive knowledge and skill beyond maintaining sterility and monitoring the patient in the operating room, this unique ruralfocused continuing education course supported rural nurses to engage and apply evidence-based knowledge to enhance preoperative care. The project was reinforced by primary healthcare initiatives, underpinned by social determinants of health. This project added to the growing body of nursing knowledge and evidence exploring the impact of social determinants of health on surgical outcomes. It also advanced preoperative nursing skills and knowledge, to reduce surgical inequities, that are critical to optimizing patients

    Keep ticking: congestive heart failure self management program

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    The social determinants of health are factors that impact an individual’s ability to self-manage congestive heart failure. Social determinants of health impact adherence to treatment and self-monitoring. Assessing how the social determinants of health impact patients on an individual level improves patient-centered care planning and health education. Registered nurses play a key role in facilitating access to health care resources and promoting healthy behaviors by building effective relationships and fostering open communication. There is a gap in practice within the Calgary Integrated Home Care Program in what patients need to be supported with, and what they end up being supported with. The Keep Ticking: Congestive Heart Failure Self- Management program offers an education seminar to registered nurses working with heart failure patients that highlights how the social determinants of health affect heart failure management, the role nurses have in addressing heart failure management, and provides strategies in which nurses can use to improve the delivery of health education. This program also uses an assessment tool that nurses use with heart failure patients to identify specific self-management barriers related to the social determinants of health and acts as a guideline in how nurses can help support patients in mitigating those barriers. This program has shown to be effective in improving health education by assessing baseline understanding of patient’s knowledge in heart failure management. Further assessment tool adaption and timing is required to improve its applicability in the home care program. Future program implementation will focus on collaboration and building relationships for effective patient-provider relationships. Nurses in the home care setting are limited on how they can address barriers related to the social determinants of health. Action is required beyond the level of care that home care nurses can provide, and further intervention is required on a social and political level

    A delphi study using expert consensus to develop a well-defined vision for a centre of excellence for therapeutic recreation in continuing care settings

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    There is an increasing demand for evidence-based practice and for the demonstration of client outcome achievement in therapeutic recreation (TR). There is also an ongoing need to research TR service provision in continuing care settings. The TR profession is well-suited to improving the well-being and quality of life of individuals living in continuing care facilities, however, current TR services are not standardized and vary greatly between settings and practitioners. Centres of Excellence are organizations that endeavour to establish high standards of practice in a specific profession or area of research. A Centre of Excellence could be instrumental in improving the delivery of quality TR services in continuing care settings. In this study, a Delphi expert consensus method was used to obtain a well-defined vision for a CoE for TR in continuing care settings. Three rounds of online questionnaires were completed by an expert panel of 11 TR professionals working in continuing care settings over a period of nine weeks. Based on the findings of this study, the participants came to the consensus that the vision of the CoE should be to inspire and advocate for quality TR services in continuing care settings through increased research and evidence-based practice. The findings from this study contribute to the development of a CoE for TR in continuing care settings that will be housed at the University of Lethbridge. They could also contribute to the development of additional CoEs for TR with other client populations—a topic that has been largely unexplored in the research literature

    Examining the effectiveness of mental health workshops in reducing mental illness self and social stigma among Asian men in Vancouver, Canada: a randomized control trial

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    Background: Asian men may be more susceptible to stigmatizing attitudes towards mental illness and treatment due to the gendered and cultural expectations created by society, compared to Asian women, which may delay or prevent this population from seeking professional help. Research Hypothesis: All interventions will be effective in reducing self and social stigma, as measured by ISMI and CAMI scores. Furthermore, ACT participation will be effective in reducing self stigma and CEE participation will be effective in reducing social stigma. Lastly, ACT+CEE participation will be effective in reducing self and social stigma. Methods: Data from a randomized control trial (RCT) were used to examine Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), Contact-based Empowerment and Education (CEE), and ACT + CEE anti-stigma interventions and a control group on their effectiveness in reducing self and social stigma. Data have been collected using the ISMI and the CAMI scales to assess self and social stigma, respectively. These self-reported questionnaires have been administered at baseline/pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, 3 months post-intervention, and 6 months post-intervention. Statistical Methods: Repeated measures ANOVA were performed to determine if there was a significant interaction between the intervention and multiple time points on ISMI and CAMI scores. Linear mixed effects models were performed on ISMI and CAMI composite scores to control for confounding. Results: No significant differences in ISMI scores were seen across all time points for all interventions. Significant reduction in CAMI scores were seen for the CEE intervention up to 3 months, suggesting that effects of the intervention were short-lived. Our findings highlight the need of implementing interventions to reduce the mental health stigma among Asian men

    Experiences of depression among African immigrant men in southern Alberta, Canada

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    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of depression among African immigrant men in Southern Alberta. The study adopted an exploratory descriptive qualitative research design using focused semi-structured interviews with ten African immigrant men. Thematic analysis showed that African men went through episodes of sadness and frustrations due to intersection of challenges post-migration, which negatively impacted both their physical and mental health. However, instead of seeking professional help, they employed a series of coping mechanisms to mitigate, tolerate, or overcome the mental distress. It was evident that African men’s cultural constructions around masculinity influenced how they perceived, interpreted, and expressed their mental distress. Culture and masculinity also shaped their strategies for coping with the mental distress and behaviour towards help-seeking. It is recommended that stakeholders and policy makers apply cultural safety approaches to support African immigrant men to enhance their mental well-being
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