779 research outputs found

    The genetic basis of endometriosis and comorbidity with other pain and inflammatory conditions

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    Endometriosis is a common condition associated with debilitating pelvic pain and infertility. A genome-wide association study meta-analysis, including 60,674 cases and 701,926 controls of European and East Asian descent, identified 42 genome-wide significant loci comprising 49 distinct association signals. Effect sizes were largest for stage 3/4 disease, driven by ovarian endometriosis. Identified signals explained up to 5.01% of disease variance and regulated expression or methylation of genes in endometrium and blood, many of which were associated with pain perception/maintenance (SRP14/BMF, GDAP1, MLLT10, BSN and NGF). We observed significant genetic correlations between endometriosis and 11 pain conditions, including migraine, back and multisite chronic pain (MCP), as well as inflammatory conditions, including asthma and osteoarthritis. Multitrait genetic analyses identified substantial sharing of variants associated with endometriosis and MCP/migraine. Targeted investigations of genetically regulated mechanisms shared between endometriosis and other pain conditions are needed to aid the development of new treatments and facilitate early symptomatic intervention

    Sex, drugs and superbugs: The rise of drug resistant STIs

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    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) presents a swiftly advancing challenge to a wide range of healthcare and health promotion practices. While rising rates of AMR share some dimensions across contexts, the specificities of field, practice, place and population shape – and at times hinder attempts to stem – the rising tide of this health threat. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are one area of healthcare where the threat of AMR has traditionally been met with lethargy. In this paper, we draw on a range of stakeholder perspectives across practice, innovation and regulatory systems in Australia, the US and the UK to understand and examine the evolving nexus of STIs and AMR, including the roles of cultural reception, professional practice and political traction. We argue for a critical sociology of the nexus of sexual health and evolving resistance, which will be instructive for comprehending inaction and informing future developments. We also note that part of this critical sociology must involve challenging stigma concerning sexual practices and people/groups, and recognising the role of communities in driving positive change

    The genetic basis of endometriosis and comorbidity with other pain and inflammatory conditions

    Get PDF
    Endometriosis is a common condition associated with debilitating pelvic pain and infertility. A genome-wide association study meta-analysis, including 60,674 cases and 701,926 controls of European and East Asian descent, identified 42 genome-wide significant loci comprising 49 distinct association signals. Effect sizes were largest for stage 3/4 disease, driven by ovarian endometriosis. Identified signals explained up to 5.01% of disease variance and regulated expression or methylation of genes in endometrium and blood, many of which were associated with pain perception/maintenance (SRP14/BMF, GDAP1, MLLT10, BSN and NGF). We observed significant genetic correlations between endometriosis and 11 pain conditions, including migraine, back and multisite chronic pain (MCP), as well as inflammatory conditions, including asthma and osteoarthritis. Multitrait genetic analyses identified substantial sharing of variants associated with endometriosis and MCP/migraine. Targeted investigations of genetically regulated mechanisms shared between endometriosis and other pain conditions are needed to aid the development of new treatments and facilitate early symptomatic intervention

    The EASL–Lancet Liver Commission: protecting the next generation of Europeans against liver disease complications and premature mortality

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    © 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Liver diseases have become a major health threat across Europe, and the face of European hepatology is changing due to the cure of viral hepatitis C and the control of chronic viral hepatitis B, the increasingly widespread unhealthy use of alcohol, the epidemic of obesity, and undiagnosed or untreated liver disease in migrant populations. Consequently, Europe is facing a looming syndemic, in which socioeconomic and health inequities combine to adversely affect liver disease prevalence, outcomes, and opportunities to receive care. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified pre-existing challenges to uniform implementation of policies and equity of access to care in Europe, arising from national borders and the cultural and historical heterogeneity of European societies. In following up on work from the Lancet Commission on liver disease in the UK and epidemiological studies led by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), our multidisciplinary Commission, comprising a wide range of public health, medical, and nursing specialty groups, along with patient representatives, set out to provide a snapshot of the European landscape on liver diseases and to propose a framework for the principal actions required to improve liver health in Europe. We believe that a joint European process of thinking, and construction of uniform policies and action, implementation, and evaluation can serve as a powerful mechanism to improve liver care in Europe and set the way for similar changes globally.The SHARE data collection has been funded by the European Commission through FP5 (QLK6-CT-2001-00360), FP6 (SHARE-I3: RII-CT-2006-062193; COMPARE: CIT5-CT-2005-028857; SHARELIFE: CIT4-CT-2006-028812), FP7 (SHARE-PREP: GA N°211909; SHARE-LEAP: GA N°227822; SHARE M4: GA N°261982; DASISH: GA N°283646), and Horizon 2020 (SHARE-DEV3: GA N°676536; SHARE-COHESION: GA N°870628; SERISS: GA N°654221; SSHOC: GA N°823782) and by DG Employment, Social Affairs & Inclusion. Additional funding from the German Ministry of Education and Research, the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, the US National Institute on Aging (U01_AG09740-13S2; P01_AG005842; P01_AG08291; P30_AG12815; R21_AG025169; Y1-AG-4553-01; IAG_BSR06-11; OGHA_04-064; HHSN271201300071C), and from various national funding sources is gratefully acknowledged. PC acknowledges support by the French National Agency for HIV, hepatitis and emerging infectious diseases research (ANRS / EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES).info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio
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