48 research outputs found

    “Quia Similia Similibus Applaudant”: Visual Variations of Genesis 3 in the Medieval Mind

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    In Medieval Europe, the Bible was strictly prohibited in any language other than Latin. This prohibition of vernacular scripture led to other devotional mediums that drew from Biblical stories such as the book of hours, hagiographies, and paraphrases. In the latter half of the 12th-century, a French theologian by the name of Peter Comestor finished his biblical paraphrase Historia Scholastica. Due to Historia’s comprehensiveness, it became widely circulated and recognized as university required reading. When writing on Genesis 3, (the temptation, creation of sin, and expulsion from paradise) Comestor popularized the belief that to better ensure success the devil took the form of a serpent with the head of a woman to tempt Eve. This study aims to answer questions surrounding the medieval iconographic trend of depicting the serpent in Genesis 3 with the head, or full torso, of a woman. Mainly focusing on the stylistic variants of the woman-headed serpent such as wardrobe, hairstyle, or how much or how little the serpent resembled Eve. By analyzing the societal impact of the variants as well as the opposing venerated view of other Biblical women during the medieval age I intend to better understand the views of women’s culpability for sin and misogynistic allegations against women based in medieval popular circulating opinions on Genesis 3

    Process mining online assessment data

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    Traditional data mining techniques have been extensively applied to find interesting patterns, build descriptive and predictive models from large volumes of data accumulated through the use of different information systems. The results of data mining can be used for getting a better understanding of the underlying educational processes, for generating recommendations and advice to students, for improving management of learning objects, etc. However, most of the traditional data mining techniques focus on data dependencies or simple patterns and do not provide a visual representation of the complete educational (assessment) process ready to be analyzed. To allow for these types of analysis (in which the process plays the central role), a new line of data-mining research, called process mining, has been initiated. Process mining focuses on the development of a set of intelligent tools and techniques aimed at extracting process-related knowledge from event logs recorded by an information system. In this paper we demonstrate the applicability of process mining, and the ProM framework in particular, to educational data mining context. We analyze assessment data from recently organized online multiple choice tests and demonstrate the use of process discovery, conformance checking and performance analysis techniques

    Gas Uptake by Coated and Uncoated Graphite Exposed to Air

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    A Visual Language for Modeling and Analyzing Printer Data Path Architectures

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    Contains fulltext : 91491.pdf (publisher's version ) (Closed access)ITSLE 2011 : Industrial Track of Software Language Engineering 2011, 5 July 2011, Braga, Portuga

    Building performance simulation for better design: some issues and solutions

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    To provide substantial improvements in indoor environment and energy consumption levels, there is a need to treat a building with its associated systems as a complete entity, not as the sum of a number of separate systems. Building performance simulation is ideal for this. This paper discusses some issues that hinder the routine use of simulation in building design. In particular, the paper discusses the issues of quality assurance, the relative slow software developments and the limited use (usability) of building performance simulation during the total life cycle of a building. Possible solutions are also discussed by introducing our current research

    Building performance simulation for better design: some issues and solutions

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    To provide substantial improvements in indoor environment and energy consumption levels, there is a need to treat a building with its associated systems as a complete entity, not as the sum of a number of separate systems. Building performance simulation is ideal for this. This paper discusses some issues that hinder the routine use of simulation in building design. In particular, the paper discusses the issues of quality assurance, the relative slow software developments and the limited use (usability) of building performance simulation during the total life cycle of a building. Possible solutions are also discussed by introducing our current research

    Notes on building performance simulation and the role of IBPSA

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    This paper presents several notes and remarks on the current state of building performance simulation and the role of the International Building Performance Simulation Association – IBPSA. Within this context, the paper also summarizes some of the research by the authors. The main conclusions are that building performance simulation has the potential to deliver, direct or indirect, substantial benefits to many building stakeholders and to the environment; and that IBPSA and its regional organizations, such as IBPSA-Brazil- can/ should play a major role in promoting correct application and further development of this technology
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