454 research outputs found

    Nucleophilic porous carbon materials for CO2 and H2S capture

    Get PDF
    In some embodiments, the present disclosure pertains to methods of capturing a gas from an environment by associating the environment (e.g., a pressurized environment) with a porous carbon material that comprises a plurality of pores and a plurality of nucleophilic moieties. In some embodiments, the associating results in sorption of gas components (e.g., CO2 or H2S) to the porous carbon materials. In some embodiments, the methods of the present disclosure also include a step of releasing captured gas components from porous carbon materials. In some embodiments, the releasing occurs without any heating steps by decreasing environmental pressure. In some embodiments, the methods of the present disclosure also include a step of disposing released gas components and reusing porous carbon materials. Additional embodiments of the present disclosure pertain to porous carbon materials that are used for gas capture

    Use of carbon nanomaterials with antioxidant properties to treat oxidative stress

    Get PDF
    In some embodiments, the present invention provides methods of treating oxidative stress in a subject by administering a therapeutic composition to the subject. In some embodiments, the therapeutic composition comprises a carbon nanomaterial with anti-oxidant activity. In some embodiments, the anti-oxidant activity of the carbon nanomaterial corresponds to ORAC values between about 200 to about 15,000. In some embodiments, the administered carbon nanomaterials include at least one of single-walled nanotubes, double-walled nanotubes, triple-walled nanotubes, multi-walled nanotubes, ultra-short nanotubes, graphene, graphene nanoribbons, graphite, graphite oxide nanoribbons, carbon black, oxidized carbon black, hydrophilic carbon clusters, and combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the carbon nanomaterial is an ultra-short single-walled nanotube that is functionalized with a plurality of solubilizing groups. In some embodiments, the carbon nanomaterial is a polyethylene glycol functionalized hydrophilic carbon cluster (PEG-HCC). In some embodiments, the administered therapeutic compositions of the present invention may also include an active agent or targeting agent associated with the carbon nanomaterial. Additional embodiments of the present invention pertain to the aforementioned carbon nanomaterial compositions for treating oxidative stress

    Porous carbon materials for CO2 separation in natural gas

    Get PDF
    In some embodiments, the present disclosure pertains to materials for use in CO2 capture in high pressure environments. In some embodiments, the materials include a porous carbon material containing a plurality of pores for use in a high pressure environment. Additional embodiments pertain to methods of utilizing the materials of the present disclosure to capture CO2 from various environments. In some embodiments, the materials of the present disclosure selectively capture CO2 over hydrocarbon species in the environment

    Controlled, Site-Specific Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes with Diazonium Salts

    Get PDF
    This work uses existing technologies to prepare a crossbar architecture of nano tubes, wherein one nanotube is fixed to a substrate, and a second nanotube is suspended a finite distance above. Both nano tubes can be individually addressed electrically. Application of opposite potentials to the two tubes causes the top tube to deform and to essentially come into contact with the lower tube. Contact here refers not to actual, physical contact, but rather within an infinitesimally small distance referred to as van der Walls contact, in which the entities may influence each other on a molecular and electronic scale. First, the top tube is physically deformed, leading to a potentially higher chemical reactivity at the point of deformation, based on current understanding of the effects of curvature strain on reactivity. This feature would allow selective functionalization at the junction via reaction with diazonium salts. Secondly, higher potential is achieved at the point of "cross" between the tubes. In a pending patent application, a method is claimed for directed self-assembly of molecular components onto the surface of metal or conductive materials by application of potential to the metal or conductive surface. In another pending patent application, a method is claimed for attaching molecules to the surface of nanotubes via the use of reactive diazonium salts. In the present invention, the directed functionalization of the crossed-nanotube junctions by applying a potential to the ends of the nanotubes in the presence of reactive diazonium slats, or other reactive molecular species is claimed. The diazonium salts are directed by the potential existing at the junction to react with the surface of the nanotube, thus placing functional molecular components at the junctions. The crossed nano tubes therefore provide a method of directly addressing the functionalized molecules, which have been shown to function as molecular switches, molecular wires, and in other capacities and uses. Site-specific functionalization may enable the use of nanotubes in molecular electronic applications because device functionality is critical at the cross points

    Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    Get PDF
    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material

    Process for making polymers comprising derivatized carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    Get PDF
    The present invention incorporates new processes for blending derivatized carbon nanotubes into polymer matrices to create new polymer/composite materials. When modified with suitable chemical groups using diazonium chemistry, the nanotubes can be made chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as mechanical strength) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. To achieve this, the derivatized (modified) carbon nanotubes are physically blended with the polymeric material, and/or, if desired, allowed to react at ambient or elevated temperature. These methods can be utilized to append functionalities to the nanotubes that will further covalently bond to the host polymer matrix, or directly between two tubes themselves. Furthermore, the nanotubes can be used as a generator of polymer growth, wherein the nanotubes are derivatized with a functional group that is an active part of a polymerization process, which would also result in a composite material in which the carbon nanotubes are chemically involved

    Process for attaching molecular wires and devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    Get PDF
    The present invention is directed towards processes for covalently attaching molecular wires and molecular electronic devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof. Such processes utilize diazonium chemistry to bring about this marriage of wire-like nanotubes with molecular wires and molecular electronic devices

    Process for derivatizing carbon nanotubes with diazonium species and compositions thereof

    Get PDF
    Methods for the chemical modification of carbon nanotubes involve the derivatization of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes, including small diameter (ca. 0.7 nm) single-wall carbon nanotubes, with diazonium species. The method allows the chemical attachment of a variety of organic compounds to the side and ends of carbon nanotubes. These chemically modified nanotubes have applications in polymer composite materials, molecular electronic applications, and sensor devices. The methods of derivatization include electrochemical induced reactions, thermally induced reactions, and photochemically induced reactions. Moreover, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the derivatized nanotubes are chemically compatible with a polymer matrix, allowing transfer of the properties of the nanotubes (such as, mechanical strength or electrical conductivity) to the properties of the composite material as a whole. Furthermore, when modified with suitable chemical groups, the groups can be polymerized to form a polymer that includes carbon nanotubes

    Adjusting Permittivity by Blending Varying Ratios of SWNTs

    Get PDF
    A new composite material of singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) displays radio frequency (0 to 1 GHz) permittivity properties that can be adjusted based upon the nanotube composition. When varying ratios of raw to functionalized SWNTs are blended into the silicone elastomer matrix at a total loading of 0.5 percent by weight, a target real permittivity value can be obtained between 70 and 3. This has particular use for designing materials for microwave lenses, microstrips, filters, resonators, high-strength/low-weight electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, antennas, waveguides, and low-loss magneto-dielectric products for applications like radome construction
    • …
    corecore