24 research outputs found

    Information and the Art Historian: Some Notes on Herding Cats

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    This presentation examines the information behaviors within the realm of art history, provides a discussion of several key issues impacting art historians’ interactions with information, and offers a view of potential future information- based developments within the discipline. After an overview of the discipline and applicable models of information behaviors, the presentation will examine information bottlenecks, particularly those surrounding visual information. The <br>presentation closes with suggestions concerning ways to support art historians, and a discussion of the role that information professionals play in the development of the discipline.<br><br>Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin, an Associate Professor in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University, teaches and performs research on metadata, information organization, digital libraries, digital preservation, and the access to and use of visual information. Prior to her appointment at Wayne State<br>University her career included archaeological fieldwork, art history teaching, and the curation of visual resources. Her research has been published in a number of scholarly journals, including the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Journal of Documentation, Journal of Academic Librarianship, Knowledge Organization, and Art Documentation, and she has presented at conferences including those of the Association for Information Science and Technology, the Association for College and Research Libraries, the College Art Association, the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries, and the Visual Resources Association.<br><br

    Institutional repositories and the humanities: A new collaborative model for scholarly publishing

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    <p>Slides used for presentation at the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).</p> <p> </p> <p>Traditionally, academic library systems have used institutional repositories to preserve, collect, and provide access to scholarly work produced by those comprising their respective university community. This places libraries near the end of the total information lifecycle, acting in the roles of secondary distributors and collectors. By better utilizing institutional repository software, academic libraries are able to go beyond these roles and instead act as a participant in the creation and distribution of scholarly work. Institutional repositories now have the ability to turn libraries into digital publishers. This is particularly important for humanities scholars, a group that is still largely dependent on the traditional publishing model for sharing scholarly information. By embracing institutional repositories and digital publishing, humanities scholars will be encouraged to reconsider what defines a scholarly work in the 21st century, which may then lead to new methods for creating and sharing scholarly information in a digital environment.</p

    Translation problems: Why humanists are so difficult about data

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    Even as more people identify as digital humanists, information professionals often have trouble getting humanists to talk about data management, prepare plans for data sustainability, or even put their data in a logical place. But there's a good reason for this: Humanists don't tend to think of their sources as data -- not because they're not used to computers, but because of epistemological problems with the very term "data." Miriam Posner will explain what these problems are and what they might mean for digital humanities and librarianship

    Massive collaboration and the open humanities: The American Yawp as case study

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    Recent trends in the digital humanities have produced significant breakthroughs in humanities research. Yet the production of high-quality open-access, teaching-centered projects has not kept pace with these research innovations. But the founding values of the field offer a way forward. Joseph Locke and Ben Wright, editors of the open American history textbook The American Yawp survey the history of open educational resources and call digital humanists to maintain the spirit of openness and pedagogical innovation that animated the early period of digital humanities. By providing a practical bridge between the fundamental values of the digital humanities and the realities of contemporary classrooms, Locke and Wright both historicize and advocate for the democratic imperatives of the field.<br><br><br><a href="http://www.americanyawp.com/" target="_blank">www.americanyawp.com</a

    Introduction to the 2016 Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities

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    <p>Slides used for presentation at the Second Symposium on Information & Technology in the Arts &  Humanities (May 18, 2016). <a href="http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/">http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/</a> The Symposium was sponsored by the Special Interest Groups for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS) of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). </p><p></p><p>Introduction to the Symposium by Jeremy L. McLaughlin, Krystyna Matusiak, and Diane Rasmussen Pennington. The theme for the 2016 event was "connecting the arts and humanities through technology – data, images, and sound."</p><p> </p><p></p> <p>Symposium presentations can be viewed at: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2v-vQy9W5DeXsuC5-l-T65WgFrPFKNDk">https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2v-vQy9W5DeXsuC5-l-T65WgFrPFKNDk</a> </p

    Visual literacy in practice

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    Digital technology has dramatically changed the way students utilize visual materials by enabling easy creation and reuse. The influx of resources in the visual mode of representation has created new possibilities for teaching and learning in an academic environment that has traditionally favored the text as a source of knowledge. However, the proliferation of images and ease of copying and pasting do not mean that students know how to select appropriate images, evaluate them in regard to meaning, quality, and copyright, and integrate them into academic work effectively. With the expanding role of images in communication and education, visual literacy is gaining more attention in research and practice. The concept of visual literacy includes critical understanding of visual information as well as the skills in creation and processing of digital images. This presentation will report the findings of the research project that examined undergraduate and graduate students’ visual literacy skills and use of images and other visual information resources in the context of academic work. The study explored the types of visual resources being used in students’ academic work, the role images play in academic papers and presentations, and the ways students select, evaluate, and process images. For the purpose of this study, we collected documentary evidence in the form of students’ papers and presentations, questionnaires about visual practices, and conducted interviews with 15 undergraduate and graduate students. The findings of the study indicate that undergraduate as well as graduate students lack basic visual literacy skills in selecting, evaluating, and using images. Students use a range of visual resources in their presentations but rarely use images in papers. We found students struggle with proper use of images in academic work, and feel that visual literacy is an important concept that should be addressed in library instruction alongside information literacy. This presentation will discuss the findings as well as implications for expanding visual literacy awareness and education. It will offer suggestions for incorporating visual literacy skills into instruction and collaborating with campus stakeholders to address the lack of visual literacy education

    Link It: Exploring Semantic Richness in Digital Collections

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    <br> <p>Slides used for presentation at the Second Symposium on Information & Technology in the Arts &  Humanities (May 18, 2016). <a href="http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/">http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGAH/2016/01/15/2016-symposium/</a> The Symposium was sponsored by the Special Interest Groups for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS) of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). </p> <p>Symposium presentations can be viewed at: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2v-vQy9W5DeXsuC5-l-T65WgFrPFKNDk">https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2v-vQy9W5DeXsuC5-l-T65WgFrPFKNDk</a></p><p><br></p> <p>This presentation provides an overview of the UNLV Linked Open Data project; demonstrating how LOD principles can be applied to CONTENTdm digital collections. Topics covered include concepts and principles guiding communities creating LOD, evolution in the role of metadata creator/LOD contributor, and key benefits to digital library researchers.</p> <p> </p> <p><b>Cory Lampert</b> is the Head of Digital Collections at the UNLV University Libraries where she is responsible for operations and strategic planning for a dynamic department that comprises digitization facilities, several digital collections systems/technologies and grant-funded projects such as the Nevada Digital Newspaper Program. Cory's research interests are in the areas of linked open data, strategic planning for digital libraries, and mentorship of new librarians. When not working on digital libraries and metadata, she likes hiking the peaks of the Mountain West.</p

    Speculative code studies, or, notes on the future of critique in the (digital) humanities

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    Alex Monea will offer some of the initial outlines of his current research project that aims to develop a new methodology tentatively coined <i>speculative code studies</i>. In theory, the idea is that critical code, software, and hardware studies can be made to speak to blackboxed systems or pieces of code, software, and hardware, and that they can do so in an anexact, yet rigorous way that preserves their critical-analytical purchase. Such a practice would look to constitute a sufficient, if piecemeal, archive of materials for rigorous speculation about the contents of black boxes. Beyond the event horizon of the black-box lie the secrets to the future of technically grounded humanistic inquiry into the stakes of computational media. Without a rigorous theory and method of speculative code studies, critical code, software, and hardware studies remain subalternized, unable to speak (back) to the power structures that conditioned and continually modulate their identities. In short, if our emerging field(s) of technically grounded scholarship remains mute about Google/Alphabet, Facebook, Amazon, Alibaba, Weibo, and their ilk, then we are missing something crucial. This workshop will begin with an outline of some of these ideas and will be preceded by discussion of how we might further such a research agenda and achieve the goal of socio-politically meaningful code, software, and hardware studies

    Piloting interactive exhibits in the academic research library

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    <p>Slides used for presentation at the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).</p> <p> </p> <p>Erin Fletcher is the Exhibits Coordinator at The Ohio State University Libraries. She entered the world of academic libraries from a background in contemporary art, curatorial practice, and museum education. Her research interests include art in public space, the overlap between art and politics, and engagement as it pertains to exhibits. At OSU she has led the development of a centralized library exhibit program. She supports curators and librarians in building audience-centric and accessible exhibits through interactivity, inclusion, and partnership. To make exhibits a viable form of outreach for distinctive collections and library services she advances programs that involve students and faculty in the exhibit making process. Most recently she was a presenter at The Engaged Librarian: Libraries Partnering with Campus and Community in October of 2014.</p> <p>Meris Mandernach is an Associate Professor in University Libraries and is the Head of Research Services at The Ohio State University Libraries. Her research interests relates to user access to resources and services, primarily those that arise from issues and problems that are directly observed in her daily work. She has conducted usability studies, worked with faculty to develop programmatic approaches to curriculum development, and examined access to collection and its impact on usage. Recently her presentations have focused on collaborations with faculty on interactive exhibits, developing innovative research spaces, and alternative learning experiences such as Hackathons.</p> <p>Arnab Nandi is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at The Ohio State University. Arnab’s research is in the area of database systems, focusing on challenges in big data analytics and interactive query interfaces. The goal of his group is to allow humans to explore and interact with large and complex data. This involves solving problems that span the areas of databases, visualization, human-computer interaction, and information retrieval. Arnab is also a founder of The STEAM Factory, a collaborative interdisciplinary research and public outreach initiative, and faculty director of the Ohio State Hackathon Program. Arnab has been a recipient of the NSF CAREER award, the Google Faculty Award, the BETHA award, and a Yahoo! PhD Fellowship. Prior to Ohio State, Arnab received his PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2011.</p> <p>Alex Oliszewski is the Assistant Professor of Media Design for Live Performance and Installation at The Ohio State University. He holds a joint appointment between the Department of Theatre and The Advanced Computing Center of Arts and Design (ACCAD.) He recently had an interview published in the October edition Live Design International (http://livedesignonline.com/). He was also a presenter on a 2013 technology panel on the topic “Transcending the Meer Projection: Devising Experiential Media Systems for Performance Authorship.” In 2014 Alex taught a series of advanced skills workshops in media design and its attendant technologies for Live Design Institute at Arizona State University, Fort Lewis College in Durango Colorado. He has done professional Design and consultancy work with Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis MN as well as Cirque Du Soleil.</p

    Emerging priorities and strategies for digital humanities funding

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    <p>Slides used for presentation at the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).</p> <p>Perry Collins is a Senior Program Officer in the Office of Digital Humanities at the National Endowment for the Humanities. At the NEH, Perry is responsible for managing and developing grant programs, administrating the application review process, and providing guidance to NEH awardees throughout the course of their projects. In this position, she has overseen major awards to initiatives such as the Digital Public Library of America. Perry also manages NEH’s fledgling digital repository, a new effort to preserve materials that document the history of the Endowment. She holds a M.S. in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a M.A. in American Studies from the University of Kansas.</p
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