235 research outputs found

    Oil and GCC financial markets: The significance of the oil price collapse

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    Do Oil-Rich GCC Countries Finance US Current Account Deficit?

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    Given the secrecy that wraps the flows of the GCC countries petrodollar surpluses to the United States and the pressures on these countries to spend and recycle more, this study attempts to uncover the direct and reverse causal relationships between the GCC financial accounts and the US current account deficit. It examines whether the GCC petrodollar surpluses are a global savings glut (an external factor) that causes the US current account deficit or in contrary this deficit is home-grown and the petrodollar savings glut hypothesis does not hold. It particularly focuses on worlds largest oil exporter to find out if the homegrown deficit hypothesis for the worlds largest oil consumer holds. It also investigates which types of investments or components of GCC financial accounts help cause the US deficit the most. The implications and policy recommendations for this growing source of global external imbalances are also provided. --Capital account,Financial account,Direct and reverse causality

    Risk Management of Precious Metals

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    This paper examines volatility and correlation dynamics in price returns of gold, silver, platinum and palladium, and explores the corresponding risk management implications for market risk and hedging. Value-at-Risk (VaR) is used to analyze the downside market risk associated with investments in precious metals, and to design optimal risk management strategies. We compute the VaR for major precious metals using the calibrated RiskMetrics, different GARCH models, and the semi-parametric Filtered Historical Simulation approach. Different risk management strategies are suggested, and the best approach for estimating VaR based on conditional and unconditional statistical tests is documented. The economic importance of the results is highlighted by assessing the daily capital charges from the estimated VaRs. The risk-minimizing portfolio weights and dynamic hedge ratios between different metal groups are also analyzed.Precious metals; conditional volatility; risk management; value-at-risk

    "Exchange Rate and Industrial Commodity Volatility Transmissions, Asymmetries and Hedging Strategies"

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    This paper examines the inclusion of the dollar/euro exchange rate together with four important and highly traded commodities - aluminum, copper, gold and oil- in symmetric and asymmetric multivariate GARCH and DCC models. The inclusion of exchange rate increases the significant direct and indirect past shock and volatility effects on future volatility between the commodities in all the models. Model 2, which includes the business cycle industrial metal copper and not aluminum, displays more direct and indirect transmissions than does Model 3, which replaces the business cycle-sensitive copper with the highly energy-intensive aluminum. The asymmetric effects are the greatest in Model 3 because of the high interactions between oil and aluminum. Optimal portfolios should have more euro currency than commodities, and more copper and gold than oil.

    "Exchange Rate and Industrial Commodity Volatility Transmissions and Hedging Strategies"

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    This paper examines the inclusion of the dollar/euro exchange rate together with important commodities in two different BEKK, or multivariate conditional covariance, models. Such inclusion increases the significant direct and indirect past shock and volatility effects on future volatility between the commodities, as compared with their effects in the all-commodity basic model (Model 1), which includes the highly-traded aluminum, copper, gold and oil. Model 2, which includes copper, gold, oil and exchange rate, displays more direct and indirect transmission than does Model 3, which replaces the business cycle-sensitive copper with the highly energy-intensive aluminum. Optimal portfolios should have more Euro than commodities, and more copper and gold than oil. The multivariate conditional volatility models reveal greater volatility spillovers than their univariate counterparts.

    Exchange Rate and Industrial Commodity Volatility Transmissions, Asymmetries and Hedging Strategies

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the inclusion of the dollar/euro exchange rate together with four important and highly traded commodities - aluminum, copper, gold and oil- in symmetric and asymmetric multivariate GARCH and DCC models. The inclusion of exchange rate increases the significant direct and indirect past shock and volatility effects on future volatility between the commodities in all the models. Model 2, which includes the business cycle industrial metal copper and not aluminum, displays more direct and indirect transmissions than does Model 3, which replaces the business cycle-sensitive copper with the highly energy-intensive aluminum. The asymmetric effects are the greatest in Model 3 because of the high interactions between oil and aluminum. Optimal portfolios should have more euro currency than commodities, and more copper and gold than oil.

    Exchange Rate and Industrial Commodity Volatility Transmissions and Hedging Strategies

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the inclusion of the dollar/euro exchange rate together with important commodities in two different BEKK, or multivariate conditional covariance, models. Such inclusion increases the significant direct and indirect past shock and volatility effects on future volatility between the commodities, as compared with their effects in the all-commodity basic model (Model 1), which includes the highly-traded aluminum, copper, gold and oil. Model 2, which includes copper, gold, oil and exchange rate, displays more direct and indirect transmission than does Model 3, which replaces the business cycle-sensitive copper with the highly energy-intensive aluminum. Optimal portfolios should have more Euro than commodities, and more copper and gold than oil. The multivariate conditional volatility models reveal greater volatility spillovers than their univariate counterparts.

    Causality Between Market Liquidity and Depth for Energy and Grains

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    This paper examines the roles of futures prices of crude oil, gasoline, ethanol, corn, soybeans and sugar in the energy-grain nexus. It also investigates the own- and cross-market impacts for lagged grain trading volume and open interest in the energy and grain markets. According to the results, the conventional view, for which the impacts are from oil to gasoline to ethanol to grains in the energy-grain nexus, does not hold well in the long run because the oil price is influenced by gasoline, soybeans and oil. Moreover, gasoline is preceded by only the oil price and ethanol is not foreshadowed by any of the prices. However, in the short run, two-way feedback in both directions exists in all markets. The grain trading volume effect across oil and gasoline is more pronounced in the short run than the long run, satisfying both the overconfidence/disposition and new information hypotheses across markets. The results for the ethanol open interest shows that money flows out of this market in both the short and long run, but no results suggest across market inflows or outflows to the other grain markets.Causality, market liquidity, depth, energy, grains.
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