325 research outputs found

    GMM Estimation of the Number of Latent Factors

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    We propose a generalized method of moment (GMM) estimator of the number of latent factors in linear factor models. The method is appropriate for panels a large (small) number of cross-section observations and a small (large) number of time-series observations. It is robust to heteroskedasticity and time series autocorrelation of the idiosyncratic components. All necessary procedures are similar to three stage least squares, so they are computationally easy to use. In addition, the method can be used to determine what observable variables are correlated with the latent factors without estimating them. Our Monte Carlo experiments show that the proposed estimator has good finite-sample properties. As an application of the method, we estimate the number of factors in the US stock market. Our results indicate that the US stock returns are explained by three factors. One of the three latent factors is not captured by the factors proposed by Chen Roll and Ross 1986 and Fama and French 1996.Factor models; GMM; number of factors; asset pricing

    Large-N and Large-T Properties of Panel Data Estimators and the Hausman Test

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    This paper examines the asymptotic properties of the popular within, GLS estimators and the Hausman test for panel data models with both large numbers of cross-section (N) and time-series (T) observations. The model we consider includes the regressors with deterministic trends in mean as well as time invariant regressors. If a time-varying regressor is correlated with time invariant regressors, the time series of the time varying regressor is not ergodic. Our asymptotic results are obtained considering the dependence of such non-ergodic time-varying regressors. We find that the within estimator is as efficient as the GLS estimator. Despite this asymptotic equivalence, however, the Hausman statistic, which is essentially a distance measure between the two estimators, is well defined and asymptotically \chi^2-distributed under the random effects assumption.

    GMM Estimation of the Number of Latent Factors

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    We propose a generalized method of moment (GMM) estimator of the number of latent factors in linear factor models. The method is appropriate for panels a large (small) number of cross-section observations and a small (large) number of time-series observations. It is robust to heteroskedasticity and time series autocorrelation of the idiosyncratic components. All necessary procedures are similar to three stage least squares, so they are computationally easy to use. In addition, the method can be used to determine what observable variables are correlated with the latent factors without estimating them. Our Monte Carlo experiments show that the proposed estimator has good finite-sample properties. As an application of the method, we estimate the number of factors in the US stock market. Our results indicate that the US stock returns are explained by three factors. One of the three latent factors is not captured by the factors proposed by Chen Roll and Ross 1986 and Fama and French 1996

    GMM Estimation of the Number of Latent Factors

    Get PDF
    We propose a generalized method of moment (GMM) estimator of the number of latent factors in linear factor models. The method is appropriate for panels a large (small) number of cross-section observations and a small (large) number of time-series observations. It is robust to heteroskedasticity and time series autocorrelation of the idiosyncratic components. All necessary procedures are similar to three stage least squares, so they are computationally easy to use. In addition, the method can be used to determine what observable variables are correlated with the latent factors without estimating them. Our Monte Carlo experiments show that the proposed estimator has good finite-sample properties. As an application of the method, we estimate the number of factors in the US stock market. Our results indicate that the US stock returns are explained by three factors. One of the three latent factors is not captured by the factors proposed by Chen Roll and Ross 1986 and Fama and French 1996
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